Questions tagged [evolutionary-game-theory]

The application of dynamic systems and game theory to evolving populations in biology, economics, and social sciences. It is particularly well suited for studying social dilemmas like the evolution of cooperation and altruism.

-1
votes
1answer
55 views

What’s the evolutionary benefit of cats playing with their prey?

I just saw a cat playing and teasing a wounded bird for minutes, and I immediately started to wonder what the evolutionary rationale were. After all, it seems eating the prey as soon as possible ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Is it trivial to assume a version of Hamilton's rule that applies for numerous generations?

Is it trivial to assume that a version of Hamilton's rule that applies to numerous generations is: C > rB C = lineage fitness lost by an actor, B = lineage fitness gained from the act, and r = ...
2
votes
0answers
23 views

How to check if a population density obeys replicator dynamics

Say we have a probability vector or population density $p = (p_1,...,p_n)$ with $p_i \geq 0$ and $\sum_i p_i =1$. Also assume we know the functions $g=(g_1,...,g_n)$ such that: $$p_i(t+1) = g_i(p(t))...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Would Ants and Termites be considered r or K strategists?

My initial assumption is that most swarm species would fall under r strategists due to their prodigious number of offspring, but it also occurred to me that since worker types are non-propagating we ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

The Hawk-Dove game: why is the average payoff half of the difference between reward and cost?

My question is about the well known Hawk-Dove model used in game theory. It concerns two strategies: the Hawk, which always fights the opponent, and the Dove, which does not fight and will either ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Does natural selection select for randomness in development?

In a podcast with Sean Carroll and Liv Boeree they discuss a result from game theory that the optimal strategy in the face of incomplete information can require random decision making. For example, ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

Why would pedophilia exist? [duplicate]

From an evolutionary perspective, why would anyone ever be sexually exited by small children who could not possibly have started puberty? Is it a confusion between some combination of sexual and non-...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

What is the conversion between r and FST?

From Schonman (2013): ...allele A can only invade under Hamilton’s condition R=$F_{ST}$ > C/B. From Harpending (2002): The best general definition of the coefficient of relation $R_{XY}$ ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

What metric(s) is a good proxy for relatedness?

In attempting to seed a simulation, where an individual foregoes resources that go r to same-type individuals and (1-r) to all members (including same-type individuals). What commonly used metrics ...
-1
votes
1answer
81 views

Why are worker ants not clones of the queen?

Currently worker ants of most species share only three quarters of their genetic code. It seems like worker ant clones would be better, as it would remove all genetic conflict of interest between them....
-1
votes
3answers
227 views

In the Selfish Gene, the chapter about ESS, how do the doves spread their genes?

In his explanation of the Evolutionary Stable Strategy, in the Selfish Gene, Richard Dawkins repeats a couple of times, that a population of hawk-type males would make the ground for a dove-type ...
1
vote
2answers
147 views

Does evolution only give rise to traits that confer fitness?

Does evolution only give rise to traits that confer fitness? In other words, does the existence of a trait imply it's conferring of fitness? If not, what are some counter examples?
0
votes
1answer
410 views

Does the term “fitness advantage” or “fitness disadvantage” make sense?

Same for the terms "selective advantage" and "selective disadvantage" which I intend to use synonymously. There are usages of each on Google Scholar, but do evolutionary biologists understand what is ...
0
votes
1answer
199 views

What is it called when there is natural truncation selection?

Truncation selection is when a breeder selects for animals that exhibit a value for a trait that is above a certain threshold. What is it called when nature selects for a value of a trait that is ...
5
votes
1answer
110 views

Replicator dynamics giving probabilities greater than 1?

I have a linear replicator equation and I want to simulate its dynamics to find the resting point and hopefully the Nash equilibrium. I defined strategies' payoff as $ \vec f = C*\vec p+ \vec b$, ...
2
votes
2answers
153 views

Is the suicide of a moribund individual to be considered group selection?

When a moribund individual commits suicide (e.g., Refardt, Bergmiller & Kummerli, 2013; http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/280/1759/20123035.full.pdf), is this to be considered ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Use numbers or algebra when introducing an evolutionary biology concept?

I'm working on an (approximately 20 pg) evolutionary biology paper for submission to a journal. The paper introduces a couple of strategies (I use "strategies" loosely; they can be carried out by ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

What is the necessary criterion for the maintenance of signaling honesty?

Zahavi's (1975, Journal of Theoretical Biology) handicap principle held that the cost associated with a signal is integral to ensuring that signal is accurate, since dishonest signals would be too ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Do we have information on differential reproductive success for many species?

It has been claimed that human males have a successful reproduction rate of about 40%, whereas females have 80%. This leads to the claim that we have about twice as many unique female ancestors as ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

What is Hamilton's rule for multiple generations?

What is Hamilton's rule as it applies to multiple generations? Is it that the lineage success given up by the actor must be exceeded by the lineage success acquired times the relatedness between ...
1
vote
0answers
360 views

Can the value of heritability be greater than 1?

Heritability defined as genetic variance divided by total variance seems to be bounded between 0 and 1. However, I see a way of calculating heritability on this page (http://www.radford.edu/~rsheehy/...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

How would you model the evolution of two genotypes across generations?

Say you have a genotype A that produces x offspring and another genotype B that produces y offspring, where x>y. These x offspring are of genotype A but with modest differences in fitness due to ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

When analyzing whether selection favors an allele that allocates indiscriminately, should the initial frequency of the allele be considered?

For example, Refardt, Bergmiller & Kummerli (Proceedings Royal Society-B, 2013; http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/280/1759/20123035.full.pdf) model bacteria that have been ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Why hasn't life on Earth reached an evolutionary stable strategy? [closed]

I heard in some YouTube video that cheetahs only existed 5,000,000 years and according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extinction, extinctions are occurring all the time so I assume life on Earth ...
1
vote
2answers
613 views

Why don't all male animals kill a rejecting female?

If a male animal is sure that the female animal will not reproduce with it, wouldn't it be mathematically optimal for the male to kill the female? (To ensure that no alleles of the "overreact-to-...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

Can two arms-racing species be stabilized?

I am trying to build an evolution simulator in which there is group A and group B, each group has 9 members each generation. Each generation, each member of group A will enter a competition (in the ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

What are the different causes for a snail species to have chiral dimorphism or speciate into a new species of the opposite form?

One way for the snail species to have complete chiral dimorphism where one form is an identical mirror image of the other form is if one form can't reproduce with the other form and it's predator is a ...
1
vote
0answers
1k views

Why don't all organisms reproduce asexually?

According to a comment at Why are not all species hermaphrodites?, asexually reproducing species go extinct more easily. However, I don't think sexual reproduction is a true evolutionary stable ...
-1
votes
1answer
186 views

What is the evolutionary purpose of shingles afflicting only one side of the body? [closed]

A question here asks for the name of the category of viruses that affect only one side of the body. My question is about the evolutionary purpose of that 'affects only one side' behavior. Chicken ...
1
vote
0answers
124 views

Why are brightly coloured marine animals thought not to display aposematism?

There are many brightly coloured marine animals, such as fish, corals, sea stars, and octopodes. And yet Wikipaedia says it is thought that those colours don't serve to deter predators, while they do ...
5
votes
0answers
3k views

Why is one phase of a plant dominant (Alternation of generation)

In plants, there is the alternation of generation. In nearly all land plants, one phase of the two possible phases is dominant--namely the sporophyte. The "dominance" over the other phase can be ...
3
votes
0answers
209 views

Derivation of discrete replicator dynamics

Related: Discrete vs Continuous Replicator Dynamics I am trying to perform a derivation of the discrete time replicator dynamics, but I am unable to get through Cressman's derivation in "Evolutionary ...
4
votes
1answer
98 views

Does the species of snake that eats Amphidromous inversus have chiral dimorphism?

From what I read at Schilthuizen and Davison (2005), Amphidromous inversus is a species of snail that occurs in 2 forms that are nearly mirror images of each other occurring in nearly equal ...
3
votes
1answer
172 views

Carl Sagan's ideas on the self-extermination of technological civilizations

I've read (though I can't remember the source) that Carl Sagan speculated that intelligent life forms tend to evolve on various worlds, then exterminate themselves. If true, then I'd like to learn ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Proof of the equivalence between two ways of defining ESS

Background Two common ways of defining what an Evolutionary Stable Strategy (ESS) are: First definition: Consider a population composed of populations playing two strategies, $\mathbf{p}$ and $\...
5
votes
0answers
55 views

Games with non-uniform interaction rates

Background: Many models in evolutionary game theory assume uniform interaction rates. For instance, consider the $2\times 2$ game: \begin{array}{l c c} & A & B \\ A & a & b \\ ...
2
votes
0answers
109 views

Replicator equation for mixed strategies?

The the replicator equation is usually defined for pure strategies. More specifically, the replicator eqn for $n$ strategies is given by: \begin{equation} \dot x_{i} = x_{i} \left( \sum_{j=1}^{n} a_{...
2
votes
0answers
216 views

Why did humans evolve the ability to feel such a high level of heat pain? [closed]

It's probably because our ancestors were frequently around 300°C metal which badly damages flesh in a fraction of a second because they made fires to cook. I don't see why that would cause natural ...
5
votes
1answer
723 views

Discrete vs Continuous Replicator Dynamics

The replicator eqn in the case of discrete non-overlapping generations and asexual reproduction is given by the discrete replicator eqn: $$x_i(t+1) = x_i (t)\frac{f_i(t)}{\bar f (t)}$$ where $x_i$ is ...
7
votes
1answer
804 views

The replicator equation vs the Lotka-Volterra equation

Background The replicator equation with $n$ strategies is given by the differential equation: \begin{equation} \dot x_{i} = x_{i} \left( \sum_{j=1}^{n} a_{ij}x_{j} - \phi \right) \qquad i = 1, \...
1
vote
0answers
343 views

How did the double circulatory system evolve from the single circulatory system

I already learned how the mammal circulatory system (double circulatory system) evolved from the reptilian circulatory system. How did natural selection evolve the reptilian circulatory system and the ...
3
votes
0answers
162 views

How to understand relatedness in an infinite island model?

My understanding is that the relatedness coefficient in kin selection models measures positive assortment. That is, altruism is more likely to evolve if altruists tend to interact with other altruists....
3
votes
1answer
81 views

Altruism in viscous (asexual) populations

The viscosity of a population is the tendency of offspring to remain near their place of birth. Taylor 1992 ("Altruism in viscous populations") provides a model to study how viscosity affects the ...
5
votes
1answer
110 views

Queller's 1985 version of Hamilton's rule

Queller 1985 ("Kinship, reciprocity and synergism in the evolution of social behavior") provides a generalization of Hamilton's rule that allows for non-additivity. To accomplish that, Queller writes ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

How to compute the regression of individual fitness on individual phenotype

Consider a population structured in groups of two individuals. Individuals' interactions follow an additive prisoner's dilemma: \begin{array}{c |c |c|} & C & D \\ \hline \text{Cooperate (} C \...
2
votes
1answer
114 views

Modeling inclusive fitness

Consider a population of two altruist with coefficient of relatedness $r$. The average inclusive fitness of this population will be $w_{0} + br -c$. Like in this example, assignment of inclusive ...
6
votes
2answers
202 views

Mathematical models of lineage selection

I'm interested in the concept of lineage selection (Aboitiz, 1991) as an explanation for why traits would be selected for that enhance the rate at which evolution can occur, rather than directly ...
7
votes
2answers
268 views

Hamilton's inclusive fitness approach

The underlying intuition of Hamilton's model of inclusive fitness is that we should study social behaviors from the point of view of actors -- rather than the recipients. To build his model, Hamilton ...
7
votes
1answer
126 views

Hamilton's derivation of direct fitness from his 1970 paper

In his 1970 paper "Selfish and Spiteful Behaviour in an Evolutionary Model", Hamilton uses Price's equation to derive his well-known rule $rb -c >0$. My question is about one of the steps in his ...
9
votes
3answers
219 views

Intuitive explanation for Kin- and Group- selection

It is known from theoretician in the field of kin selection that kin selection (inclusive fitness theory) and group selection are actually two sides of the same coin. In other words, these two ...