Questions tagged [gene]

The basic unit of heredity which encodes some functional RNA or protein.

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Do all humans have an identical nucleotide sequence for certain proteins, e.g haemoglobin?

All humans have the same sort of proteins in our bodies. Take haemoglobin for example. Is the gene coding for haemoglobin in my body identical to everyone else's gene or is there slight variations ...
Burtyboy80's user avatar
15 votes
5 answers
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Do men and women have the same number of genes?

As far as I know, humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes, each one which contains a particular amount of genes. But in the "last" pair, men have a XY pair chromosome, and women have a XX pair chromosome. ...
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Is there any virus that contains both DNA and RNA in its genome?

It is known that viruses contain DNA or RNA- either one and not both. I came across a question: Which virus contains both DNA and RNA?
rishab bairagi's user avatar
11 votes
3 answers
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Is TTGATATAT a gene?

Biologists use the sequence of letters A, C, T and G to model genomes. A gene is a substring of a genome that begins after the three-character ATG and ends before the three-character TAG, TAA, and TGA....
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Why does human chromosome 19 have the second highest number of protein-coding genes?

While chromosome 19 only is the 19th largest autosomal chromosome, it contains 1440 protein-coding genes, and thus has the second highest number of protein-coding genes of any human chromosome. For ...
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10 votes
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Genes and Intelligence

Assuming that intelligence has a genetic component, • do we know which genes contribute to it? and, if so, • can we predict intelligence from genomic analysis?
Siddhartha's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
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Why aren't gene drives extremely common?

The ability for gene drives to sidestep the Mendelian mechanism and rapidly spread through populations (even if the gene is slightly fitness reducing) is extremely powerful. Why aren't normal ...
Jess Riedel's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
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Father with mutated mtDNA- why isn't his offspring at risk?

Mothers transmit their mitochondria (and therefore mtDNA) to their offspring and fathers don't. Lets assume that father had a mutation of the gene that encodes mtDNA, would then be his offspring at ...
user114141's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
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Whole Genome Sequencing vs Whole Exome Sequencing

I am working on a project where I want to discover causative genes for a certain disease I may have. I was wondering whether to get WGS or WES to perform this experiment:- I am looking at SNP's and ...
physio's user avatar
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Which DNA elements belong to the definition of a gene?

I see a lot of different DNA elements mentioned as part of a gene (talking about eukaryotes): The length of DNA following the promoter is a gene and it contains the recipe for a protein. (video) ...
KingBoomie's user avatar
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What does it mean to "map the human genome"

I know some elementary chemistry and biology. I also think I know what a gene is (it's a sequence of DNA which encodes a particular protein). I also know that on a chromosome there are sections of DNA ...
Mick's user avatar
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Why does eyebrow growth stop after it reaches a specific length?

When compared to hair that grows forever after we cut it, why do eyebrows stop growing? What genes measure current length of eyebrow to ensure it stops growing after a specific length?
Mohammad Fajar's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
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Explain a gene network to a first year undergrad

I have an adjacency matrix with list of genes connected to each other which signifies the gene network. How do you get this information that one gene is connected to other in the first place. Is it ...
The Last Word's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
3k views

What is the difference between "physical interaction" and "genetic interaction"?

I searched sac1 in uniprot to know more about this gene. in interaction I selected this link and there I see that this gene has some "physical interactions" and "genetic interactions". I am wondering ...
MySky's user avatar
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How allele is related to trait that is more complex than two cases (ex. height)?

Recently I started to learn about evolution and genetics. Simple stuff at the beginning - some videos, some reading. So far, everything seems to be pretty simple and straightforward. I easily grasp ...
waste's user avatar
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What happens if there is a blood incompatibility during pregnancy?

There are possible combinations of blood types with the rH factors: Rh factors are genetically determined. A baby may have the blood type and Rh factor of either parent, or a combination of both ...
Ebbinghaus's user avatar
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Can methylation of a promoter induce gene expression in some rare cases?

Can methylation of a promoter induce gene expression in some rare cases? I've read somewhere that methylation of an intron can induce gene expression (eg. Igf2). How is that even possible? Thank ...
user114141's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
401 views

How do I know whether or not a nuclear gene is single copy?

As a part of a phylogenetic study, I need to find a nuclear gene that meets the following requirements: Single copy gene; Highly variable gene; Gene longer than 400 bps; Gene that gives information ...
jvddorpe's user avatar
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2 answers
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Animal gene in plants

Usually only microbes, specifically bacteria are used to express genes of other species for various functions. But, it is possible to try and express an animal gene into a plant. Bacteria like ...
MPG's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
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Stop codons and exons?

If we had a hypotheical gene called gene exampleGene and this gene had 5 exons, labeled A, B, C, D, and E in that order on the chromosome, could it be the case that the stop codon for this gene be on ...
Ro Siv's user avatar
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4 votes
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What is the difference between non-coding and intergenic regions?

The initial question was about understanding what is in the downstream of a gene in a eukaryotic organism. I understand that this region is located 3' of a gene, and therefore I would expect to find ...
Silvia VC's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
675 views

Gene and alleles

This is a multiple choice question: Consider a gene, ABC, which codes for an enzyme involved in the metabolism of sugars. There are two known alleles of this gene, ABC1 and ABC2. Which statement ...
Dave N.'s user avatar
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2 answers
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What motivates an organism to reproduce? [closed]

What is the biological factor (gene or something else in case of humans) which motivates an organism to reproduce? By reproducing the evolutionary success of an organism increases. But why would an ...
Tarun Gupta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
272 views

Genomic library preparation: Why does the restriction enzyme not cut into the gene?

I am currently trying to understand creating a genomic library more profoundly. In most textbooks I read (as well as wikipedia), they mentioned that the genomic library is created by isolating the DNA ...
Felix H.'s user avatar
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1 answer
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Where to download gene list of human genome?

I am looking for a place where I can download a full gene list of human genome. Either by HGNC symbol or ensemble ID as long as it is usable on the consensusPathdatabase. Up until this point I have ...
Marciano's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
307 views

How can human infants express chymosin with only a pseudogene at their disposal?

I read on the Wikipedia article about Chymosin http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chymosin It stated that chymosin is produced by gastric chief cell in human infants. But it also stated that human only ...
Brainchild Ho's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
70 views

Can the same target gene be regulated differently by the same transcription factor under different conditions?

I'm very new in biology and doing more computational analysis. I'm confused with the type of interactions between Transcription Factors (TF) and target genes. Is it possible that the same ...
sbmm's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
91 views

How many co-expressed genes would be expected in a tissue?

I am working with gene expression microarrays of tumor tissues and I want to use a program to find the clusters of co-expressed genes in order to know if some particular genes are co-expressed with ...
Fernando's user avatar
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4 answers
403 views

What does the gene name "lexA" stand for?

It is an important gene expressed in E. coli that represses the SOS response and also the expression of lambda lytic phase genes. UV light and damage to DNA is responsible for its breakdown and hence ...
Masih Sherafatian's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
6k views

Interpretation of picture of human chromosomes

Does this picture show sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes? If they are homologous then what is YY? If they are sister chromatids then do homologous chromosomes ever appear like this (with the ...
BEWARB's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
257 views

What determines the efficiency of electron production in photosynthetic bacteria?

Is there a specific gene involved, perhaps? Would one be able to genetically engineer a bacterium to oxidize water and generate electrons quicker? I am speaking about this biological problem in terms ...
Alina Davydov's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
363 views

How do gene locations change during crossing over events?

Suppose you have two variants from the same species, which have slightly different chromosomes I's to each other. Genes may be in slightly different positions on the chromosome, and the lengths of the ...
Jabbath's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
289 views

Single copy housekeeping genes

I am working on a tool for SNP calling in polyploid plants. To test my method, I need a list of housekeeping genes common in almost all plants. For my case, these genes must be single copy (ie each HK ...
MySky's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
82 views

How to generate pathway fingerprints of drugs?

I have studied a paper that constructs the pathway fingerprint of a drug, which has a vector of $0$ and $1$, and they compare the pathway fingerprint using a similarity measure to assess how similar ...
Orca's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
143 views

Is there a risk that genetically modified organisms displace genes of other species via horizontal gene transfer?

It is known that species can rely on certain genes to survive. See for example this publication. An argument often made by environmental groups is that genes introduced by genetically modified ...
CuriousIndeed's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
69 views

How to do a blast search for similar sequences?

Tried doing a Blast search for a PPO gene in an advocado genome: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/blast/Blast.cgi?PAGE_TYPE=BlastSearch&PROG_DEFAULTS=on&BLAST_SPEC=OGP__3435__73885&DATABASE=...
Dale's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
122 views

Is the term 'allele' specific to sexual populations?

I had always thought that 'allele' simply meant a variant of a gene and thus could be used in the context of either asexual or sexual populations. With it only being slightly less useful as a concept ...
Artem Kaznatcheev's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
144 views

Is there a term for the opposite of intergenic?

I am looking for a term that describes DNA regions that overlap genes, i.e., non-intergenic DNA regions. For example, say I am writing a paper about DNA-binding sites (i.e., DNA sequences that ...
Oren Milman's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
86 views

Emergence of novel protein interactions by mutation of amino acids

Are there any examples of proteins that, without coming from a recent duplication event, underwent a mutation(s) that caused it to have a novel interaction with a new ligand, substrate, other protein ...
Ponce's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
811 views

Do chromosomes change with time?

An offspring is 23 chromosomes of mother and 23 of father, if one of the mate learns say music after the birth of their first child— will their second offspring have better music skills than former? ...
Jayant's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
108 views

What is the attachment after this gene name, following the comma: SULF1,hCG18956?

What is this part mean: hCG18956? Is it an alternate naming convention for genes? I am trying to read in a list of gene names using R, but I don't have an extensive biology background. There are ...
StarckOverflar's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
4k views

Please explain what a gene isoform is in lay terms?

I am a physicist by training, however I am now doing computational biology research. I know what genes, DNA, proteins, enzymes, introns and exons are. I sort of understand how DNA is used to create ...
irritable_phd_syndrome's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
91 views

Map gene IDs to Ensembl gene ID

Forgive me if this question is too trivial. I have the gene IDs of the following type EOG6STSR2 EOG60ZRJB EOG6SBFJ2 EOG6P5KX3 EOG6B5PRW from the first ...
abcdef's user avatar
  • 43
3 votes
2 answers
3k views

Why are tumor suppressor genes recessive?

In my Intro. to Biochemistry course, we have been studying cancer. The professor has pointed out that tumor suppressor genes are "recessive" while proto-oncogenes are "dominant". Since only one ...
Bee's user avatar
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1 answer
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Are all phenotypes normally distributed

Reposting from the stats stackexchange. John Cook, in his blog https://www.johndcook.com/blog/2015/03/09/why-isnt-everything-normally-distributed/, writes that many aren't: Adult heights follow a ...
samlaf's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
31 views

Where do biologists get information about mouse genes? [closed]

From this article https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005Sci...308.1909S/abstract “We created transgenic mice that overexpress human catalase localized in the peroxisome, nucleus, or mitochondria (...
Potion's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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Why HIV need integrase enzyme to integrate their DNA into host cell?

In gene transfer by microinjection, the gene of interest is injected into the nucleus of host cell without using integrase enzyme. So why does HIV need that enzyme? Why they not just place their DNA ...
joe's user avatar
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2 votes
6 answers
253 views

Which information can be obtained from a list of gene names?

Lets say I only have a list of gene names. I know they are up regulated and I know they are related to cancer. What information can I obtain from having only the names of genes? For example is there ...
Learner's user avatar
  • 218
2 votes
3 answers
277 views

What is the exact definition of a "gene"?

(In this question, I'm only considering the molecular-biology notion of a gene, not the older Mendelian notion.) Wikipedia defines a "gene" as "a sequence of nucleotides in DNA that is ...
tparker's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Why is the start of my coding sequence ATG and not TAC?

I am engineering a set of genetic sequences and have come across a surprisingly basic point of confusion that seems to have fallen through the cracks regarding coding sequences. The standard start ...
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