Questions tagged [genetics]

Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

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16 views

Is there a name for survival of the fittest in a single family?

Imagine a case where the children of a bird each have a 50% chance of being born blind. But the bird always has on average 4 chicks. So on average 2 will be blind and 2 sighted. (Perhaps this could ...
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Is it possible to breed neanderthals through selective breeding?

I've heard most non-subsaharan africans have neanderthal DNA with it being more prevalent in northern regions, that sometimes 1-4% of the DNA has neanderthal origins. Speaking strictly ...
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Are mutations a source of genetic variation?

Here is a question from the book SAT II Success Biology E/M (where the SAT is the exam taken by the American high school students): Which of the following statements is true about mutations? (A) ...
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Evolution of gene linkage

By what mechanisms can genes evolve to be optimally ordered along the chromosome? By optimally I mean genes being closely related in assuring high phenotypic fitness so that crossover is less likely ...
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What causes cellular differentiation?

Each cell in our body contains identical dna. And, yet some cells become liver cells, some become brain cells etc. How this happens , when all of them has same dna? Is it because of epigenetic control ...
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Difference Junk DNA and Pseudogenes

1-Are Pseudogenes and Junk DNA both Non-Coding DNA or they are different entity? How much Pseudogenes & Junk DNA do we have respectively? 2-I read that Non-Coding DNA has functions, my question ...
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Is brachydactyly due to mutation?

I have this so called "clubbed thumbs"also known as brachydactyly. It is of D-type. I searched for it on internet and found that it is a dominant inherited disease. But to my surprise,none of my ...
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How exactly gametes are formed ? See my example [closed]

lets say a specie has 10 chromossomes, so 5 pairs: Lets use a gene for each pair: Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee --> dominant aleles are on the left side of the cell and recessive in the right. how can he produce ...
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Is the genetic term “polycistronic” still used in modern biology?

Is the term "cistronic", meaning an ORF on a mRNA, still commonly used in modern genetics? I´ve seen "polycistronic" being applied to prokaryotic mRNA in old textbooks, but I´ve rarely stumbled upon ...
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Inbreeding depression in Gouldian Finches

I currently breed Gouldian finches, including the yellow mutation. I was lucky to breed 6 youngsters including pure yellow and yellow split. How far can I interbreed the offspring (i.e step brothers/...
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Species diversity in cheese and yoghurt?

There have been studies on the number of species on humans and in various other environments. I was wondering how many species including: viruses, bacteria, yeasts, and fungi inhabit ordinary farm ...
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Confusion about result of monohybrid cross in Mendelian genetics

I was studying monohybrid crosses in genetics where the character considered is stem height. Whenever I came across punnett squares, I used to calculate the probability of the genotype of the ...
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What makes an E.coli an E.coli, genotype or phenotype?

According to this paper, among 61 strains of E. coli they studied only 6% of the genes are common in all. Which means that the overwhelming majority of the genes are not shared. And wikipedia ...
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If coelocanths are more related to humans than groupers -does a Coelocanth's DNA literally have more sequences in common with a human than a grouper?

Would a coelocanth and a human still have more sequences in common than a coelocanth and a grouper? Would the coelocanth and human dna basically "look" more similar than either would to a ray-finned ...
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What does “dissection-based microscopy” mean as described here, and how can it give genetic information?

The Phys.org article 'DNA microscopy' offers entirely new way to image cells references the new Open Access paper in Cell DNA Microscopy: Optics-free Spatio-genetic Imaging by a Stand-Alone Chemical ...
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In marine DNA viral diversity studies, what would “paradigm of rampant mosaicism” refer to?

The recent paper in Cell Marine DNA Viral Macro- and Microdiversity from Pole to Pole describes the (huge) new Global Ocean Viromes 2.0 (GOV 2.0) dataset. In the Results and Discussion section, the ...
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1answer
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What's the exact meaning of and how to derive the coefficient of the path from sire to offspring?

According to Wright's Coefficients of Inbreeding and Relationship, the coefficient of the path from sire to offspring is given as $p_{o \cdot s}=\frac{1}{2}\frac{\sqrt{1+F_s}}{\sqrt{1+F_o}}$ But ...
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What is the use of having a surrogate mother in animal cloning?

In animal cloning, an ovum is collected by an animal and processed to form an embryo after fusion, which is going to be inserted to a surrogate mother. So my question is that why can't the embryo be ...
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Easy Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium [duplicate]

Hi My friend and I get 2 different answers to this question. I would like to know how to calculate the value of q. My friend says that 500/1500=q because there are 500 recessive alleles in the ...
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About DNA polymerization

What type of polymerization process performs DNA, are there ant other types than adittion and condensation polymerization?
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Studying the epigenetic variability, can I use SNPs?

So, I'm trying to study the effects of epigenetic variability on the brain structure. Can I use SNPs associated with a gene's higher expression to compute the likelihood of that gene being expressed ...
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Are all fusion genes somatic in origin or can fusion genes be germline?

Fusion genes should have an origin.These are essentially hybrid genes that are translocated in its entirety. Eg. BCR-ABL, EML4-ALK are known to be implicated in cancer pathogenesis. Do these ...
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What is Mendelian Segregation and how is it related to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

I can't find the exact definition of Mendelian segregation. In addition, I am wondering how it is related to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?
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Are chromosomal microdeletions passed on?

I've been looking around but can't find a clear answer: are chromosomal micro-deletions passed on (hereditary) or not?
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1answer
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What does “PDPN+ cells” means?

Are they podoplanin positive cells (cells that tested positive for podoplanin)? "...though it has been shown that podoplanin (PDPN+) cells analogous to mouse FRCs are found in human secondary ...
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GULO only for mammals?

I am not a biology student, but just want to know if GULO gene are present only in mammals or all species possess it ? And is GULO gene active in human fetus?
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Rationale behind Most Recent Common Ancestor (MRCA)?

My main question is this - I heard Richard Dawkins say in a video that after 1000s of years, any given individual alive today will be either an ancestor to ALL of the humans (in that future time) or ...
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How to search for a DNA sequence in a genome on ENA (European Nucleotide Archive)?

I have to do a search for small DNA sequences in the genome of an organism in ENA. I have the accession number and project id. However, I can't download the whole genome because of the download size ...
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Is the lac operon repressed in the presence of both glucose and lactose?

In the presence of both sugars (glucose and lactose) will there be repression of the lac operon completely? I know that more glucose means less cAMP --> less CAP --> less positive regulation, and ...
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How can a child be blood type AB, if both of the parents are blood type A?

Basically, both of my parents are blood type A (both are confirmed and it's also certain both of them are my biological parents). I recently found out my blood type is AB. How is this possible? I ...
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What the “due to” means in the definition of heritability?

According to Wray and Visscher, heritability is formally defined as the proportion of phenotypic variation (VP) that is due to variation in genetic values (VG). My question is, what does “due to” ...
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Advantages of pain sensation?

The hazards of congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) are well-known. This question is about the obverse: what selective advantage, if any, does the normal sensation of pain confer? I'm thinking of ...
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Are gametes diploid or haploid?

Some sources say that gametes are haploid, some say that they are diploid. I'm confused.
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For eQTL analysis, is it ok to combine all the ethnic groups?

I am performing eQTL analysis, and wish to be answered for a quick question. In conducting eQTL analysis, biologically, is it fine to include subjects from all ethnic groups (to increase statistical ...
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What does the gene name “lexA” stand for?

It is an important gene expressed in E. coli that represses the SOS response and also the expression of lambda lytic phase genes. UV light and damage to DNA is responsible for its breakdown and hence ...
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1answer
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Left and Right Handedness

Today I found out that the gene for being Left-handed is dominant while Right-handed is recessive. I personally am left handed and so is my father. My mothers father is also left handed and I was ...
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Number of DNA strands per chromosome

As I was reading Griffith's Introduction to genetic analysis this evidence was provided for single DNA makes single chromosome. Eventually geneticists demonstrated directly that certain chromosomes ...
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What species would this be?

A common way to define species can be found on Wikipedia: A species is often defined as the largest group of organisms in which any two individuals of the appropriate sexes or mating types can ...
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Gene frequency — database/site

Is there any free database when one can check the gene frequency in a healthy population? For example I would like to check it for genes like BIN1, CLU or CR1. On the English Wikipedia I found a gene ...
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How can I calculate Fst, Gst, and Nei diversity index?

I got different polymorphisms of Cucumber mosaic virus in different regions of its genome from different libraries of RNAseq. This virus have two coding regions which are 3A and CP regions. I have ...
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skin colouration in thalassemia

Now when i was studying about thalassemia, I read that anaemia is its major characterstic. I can understand that fact. But it was also written that the skin gets pale. Wikipedia says that the skin ...
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Meaning of letter “c” in description of mutation: “Homozygous c.195C>G; (p.Cys65Trp)”

In a table in a paper titled Cerebral folate deficiency: Analytical tests and differential diagnosis, there's the following description of a mutation in a patient: Homozygous c.195C>G; (p.Cys65Trp)...
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Is it possible to change the DNA of all the cells of an adult human [closed]

The process of making and transferring changes is pretty straightforward relatively speaking in an embroyo. You change the DNA of one cell and all the cells now inherit this change. But let's say ...
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Does recombination slow mutation accumulation in sexual populations? Is there any evidence?

Mullers Ratchet is the process by which asexual organisms would accumulate mutations without bound. It is claimed that sexual organisms would slow this mutation accumulation through recombination. Is ...
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Mechanism behind Philadelphia chromosome translocation?

I was reading up on causative factors of leukemia on medicinenet and I came across the following statement: ...an exchange between chromosomes 9 and 22 leads to what is known as the Philadelphia ...
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Balancing selection vs introgression?

Balancing selection can maintain polymorphisms in natural populations for extended periods of evolutionary time. However, in this paper, Dannemann et al. 2016 identify three archaic haplotypes in the ...
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1answer
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If some humans inherited 3% of Neanderthal DNA, why are we 99.9% same genome? [duplicate]

Many sources say that humans are 99.5 to 99.9 percent the same. Also some sources state that some humans have 3.4% Neanderthal DNA and some don't share those genes. Why is that?
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Are all genes transcribed in differentiated cells?

My textbook tells me that it’s specific transcription factors that allow for a different set of genes to be expressed in different cells (differential gene expression). My book gives the example of ...
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Why can't a genetically sound human stay alive for an indefinite amount of time given all the ideal conditions? [duplicate]

I have read that even if we can control our food and lifestyle and keep things as ideal as possible, there are other factors beyond our control like effects from neutrinos passing through our body ...
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How are haplotype blocks different from genes?

According to Cardon et al. 2003, a haplotype block is A discrete chromosome region of high linkage disequilibrium and low haplotype diversity. It is expected that all pairs of polymorphisms ...