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Questions tagged [genetics]

Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

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88 views

Does natural selection still increase biological complexity?

I recently read The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins, which I found very interesting. In one of the last chapters, he gives multiple possible explanations to the question "Why did natural selection ...
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Is the lac operon repressed in the presence of both glucose and lactose?

In the presence of both sugars (glucose and lactose) will there be repression of the lac operon completely? I know that more glucose means less cAMP --> less CAP --> less positive regulation, and ...
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Expected $\mu$ and $\sigma^2$ for a phenotypic trait, given heritability h and known parental phenotypic measures?

Say a measurable phenotypic trait has mean $\mu =0$, variance $\sigma^2 = 1$, and heritability $h$, meaning that h*100% of the variation in the population is caused by genetic variation and (1-h)*100% ...
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What is the probability that a gamete will only contain father's chromosomes

As it is depicted in most textbooks, cross-over does not occur between the two "outer" sister chromatids. By independent assortment during Meiosis I, there is 1/2^23 chance that all father's ...
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Question about different gametes that can be produced

I have a question from a past exam that asks the following: "For the organism of genotype AABbCcDDEe (homozygous for 2 genes, heterozygous for 3 genes), how many different types of gametes will be ...
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Could Cyanobacteria farms help dilute pollutants in the atmosphere

If I understand correctly, roughly ~2.8 billion years ago cyanobacteria started pumping large amounts of oxygen into the atmosphere. Using modern industrial processes could this be emulated by ...
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What is an operon?

What is an operon in a eukaryotic cell, and how does it regulate the expression of genes? I've already read Wikipedia, but it is not enough clear to me. Unfortunately my knowledge in genetics are very ...
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1answer
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How many generations are required for a specific neutral mutation to reach fixation?

In population genetics, the term “time to fixation” is defined as the time it takes for a specific mutation to appear in a population, plus the time required for this mutation to spread throughout ...
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How does post-transcriptional editing work?

Since exons in vertebrate genomes are generally separated from each other by introns, and since indiscriminate translation would produce non-functional proteins, vertebrate genomes have mechanisms for ...
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Examples of Genetic/DNA Redundancy in Humans and “Junk DNA”

Upon thinking of a separate concept in computer science I found myself pondering the idea of redundant DNA. I am also quite aware of the concept of "junk" DNA which does not code for anything(as far ...
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Why do men have nipples?

I'd be tempted to call nipples in men vestigial, but that suggests they have no modern function. They do have a function, of course, but only in women. So why do men (and all male mammals) have them?
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Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium for SNPs

I have a SNP stats file structure, which contains all information about genotypes and imputed SNP/INDEL imputation qualities, allele frequencies and minor allele assignment. ...
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Does a low yield of RNA effect the results of subsequent experiments?

I am extracting RNA from brain tissue and I am getting a concentration of 500 ng/µL when measured with a nanodrop. I dilute the pellet in 20 µL of water. When my colleague does the same protocol ...
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Balancing selection vs introgression?

Balancing selection can maintain polymorphisms in natural populations for extended periods of evolutionary time. However, in this paper, Dannemann et al. 2016 identify three archaic haplotypes in the ...
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Gene APOA2 SNP rs5082 alleles are A or G, but papers describe it with CC and TT?

rs5082 is a SNP in the APOA2 gene. It is associated with obesity and heart disease risk. According to this article the alleles can be A or G https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/snp/rs5082#frequency_tab Why ...
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Examples of environmentally influenced gene-expression in humans?

In discussions of the relevant importance of genetic and environmental influences on the development of the individual, it's often stated that the genetic and environmental influences interact. An ...
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Why we need an egg cell donor and a surrogate mother in an organism cloning process?

Could a whole set of artificial organism-cloning process only be operated on the somatic nuclear donor ,which means for example ,can we extract the somatic nuclear from animal "A" and put it into the ...
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Fertilization of the human egg- where does our centrosome come from?

Is there a centrosome in a human egg cell? Is the reason why the egg cell remains paused before meiosis 2 because there isn't a centrosome, and it only divides when the sperm fertilizes it thus it can ...
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GEN file format, SNPs and alleles

I have a few questions I can't seem to get a straight answer to, regarding the .gen file format and also biology in general. The ...
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What are the disadvantages of myelin

The myelination of axons has plenty of advantages. It increases signal speed in axons, and thereby reduces reaction times. This is, of course, very good for the survival of the animal in question. ...
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1answer
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x-linked recessive inheritance and correlation for males

I was inspired by a discussion in this thread. Wikipedia lists a number of disorders linked to recessive genes on the x-chromosome. One typical example is red-green color blindness. Now wikipedia says ...
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More efficient method of calculation genotype or phenotype ratios rather than doing a trihybrid punnett square or forked-line method?

Is there any other more efficient method of predicting ratios of offspring phenotypes or genotypes than doing a trihybrid Punnett square or forked-line diagram? Or are those two methods really the ...
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How to calculate percentage of DNA that ancestors contributed?

In David Reich's book "Who we are and how we got here" there is a graph explaining that more we go back in our ancestors generations, the least we have chances to have any DNA inherited from one of ...
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How does the colinearity of the HOX genes determine the body plan of an organism?

I was recently reading about colinearity in the HOX genes that give an organism its high-level body plan (where the order of the HOX genes on the chromosome follow the head-to-tail order of body ...
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1answer
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Does gene editing have any technical cross-species limits?

How far could you go in cross-species gene editing? Is it possible for example to introduce plant genes into human DNA and vice versa? Question: How is gene editing limited by the "donor" and "...
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Can men with Klinefelter syndrome produce chromosomally normal sperm?

Individuals with Klinefelter syndrome are XXY. Even though sperm counts are low some individuals can generate enough to be used in IVF and have offspring. Does this mean that when sperm are formed, ...
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Evolution of hunting behavior of parasitoid wasps

Wasps in the genus Pepsis lay their eggs in a specific region on a species of tarantula and their larvae eat the tarantula organs in a specific sequence to keep it alive as long as possible. How ...
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lifespan of Nautilus compared to other cephalopods

Most cephalopods live uncharacteristically short lifes compared to other creatures of their size and intelligence. The octopuses with the longest lifespan for example, the giant pacific octopus, only ...
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Why do individuals vary in the number of SNPs for a given gene ( e.g. FOXO3A )?

Individual #1, sequenced by 23andMe and then inputed into Promethease for SNP data has the following SNP output: 1) rs1935949(C;T) 2) rs2802292(G;T) 3) rs13217795(C;T) 4) rs13220810(C;T) 5) rs2764264(...
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Quantifying the Genetic Basis of Complex Diseases

In general, there are 2 types of diseases for which we understand "causality" very well: Infectious disease, where there is some etiological agent that causes the disease and Monogenic genetic ...
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Barr body Giemsa staining

Not all the female cheek cells show Barr Bodies when stained with Giemsa stain? Only 30 to 40% female cells show Barr Bodies. Why? Our Experiment: We washed mouth twice with listerine to reduce ...
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What are the implications/predictions of the selfish gene theory?

Are there any testable predictions or implications of the selfish gene theory? Or it is just interesting interpretation of the observations/experimental data? If this theory is not falsifiable and ...
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Genes where both a disabling mutation and copy number amplification cause different genetic diseases

I'm trying to make a list of such genes, because they must be tightly regulated. MeCP2 is one - it causes Rett Syndrome with a disabling mutation, but causes MeCP2 duplication syndrome if its copy ...
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How do mutations of viruses lead to drug resistance?

For instance, after starting zidovudine monotherapy against HIV, resistance develops against the drug because of a point mutation in the RNA transcriptase enzyme to which the drug binds. So how does ...
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What is indirect vs direction selection of genes?

As the title suggests, what is the direct and indirect selection of genes. Couldn't find a straightforward answer. Is it the same as direct and indirect fitness?
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What is a gene transcript, how is it different from an allele?

Within human genetics, My current understanding of a transcript for a particular gene is that it's the exact nucleotide sequence and position of a particular instance of said gene in some individual. ...
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Example of a virus becoming symbiotic with an organism

The human gut has an indispensably beneficial ecosystem of bacteria. What are the examples of a virus that becomes symbiotic with an organism, or even incorporates beneficially into the genome of the ...
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Frameshift Mutation

With regards to LMNA frameshift mutations further downstream in the tail region, specifically (p.Arg455Gln fs*5) which has yet to be found/recorded in any medical literature...Does anyone have any ...
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Genetic expression in interspecific hybrids

Referring to interspecific hybrids, I have the following two questions:- Quoting from wikipedia:- The offspring of an interspecific cross are very often sterile; thus, hybrid sterility prevents ...
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Which sample type is more proper for whole genome sequencing in AML patients? Peripheral blood or bone marrow?

I intend to perform whole genome sequencing in AML patients in order to find genomic abnormalities, particularly translocation and gene fusions. However, I am not sure whether it is better to obtain ...
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Can Huntington's Disease be homozygous dominant?

Can Huntington's Disease be homozygous dominant? I am not sure whether the individual who is homozygous dominant for Huntington's Disease will survive into adulthood, or die when they are infants or ...
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What is the substance that tumors release that stimulates growth of blood vessels but suppresses its release from other tumors?

I'm currently in high school and I am working on a cancer research project. My project consists of a cancer, and different ways to treat it. I have a set of benign tumor and I was thinking of ...
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In what does Genetic clustering and Cline sharpness differ?

They are both ways to measure divergence in species but I'm not understanding in what exactly the differ if both use hybrid zones and gene frequencies in the study.
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number of chromatids seen in karyotype

The karyotype is performed on a cell whose cycle has been stopped in metaphase or pro metaphase, using colchicine or by other means. In the textbooks I read that during the S phase each of the 46 ...
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Why is sickle cell trait expressed in half of all cells rather than all cells containing half-sickled haemoglobin

If sickle cell trait is due to be heterozygous with respect to a single gene mutation on the haemoglobin β-globin chain, why is it the case that ~50% of RBCs are sickled rather than half of the ...
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Genes & Map Units

Two genes of a flower, one controlling blue (B) versus white (b) petals and the other controlling round (R) versus oval (r) stamens, are linked and are 10 map units apart. You cross a homozygous blue ...
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Webtool to design guide RNA (gRNA) for use with CRISPR-AsCpf1?

My goals are to use a free webtool to: Identify guide RNAs (direct-repeat sequence followed by the targeting sequence) appropriate for use with AsCpf1 in order to target a specific segment of genomic ...
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PCR markers for C57B6

Do you know any primers that can be used to genotype mice and check if they are still C57B6? I'm concerned about genetic drift in my colony. I bought a breeding pair 3 years ago and expanded. I wanna ...
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Are there animal species where some females have greater amounts of male-associated qualities than average males?

In the human species, some women ( a meaningful, though not large percentage) are taller and stronger than the average man. Is a similar thing true in the animal kingdom? Are there some meaningful ...
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Parthenogenesis vs. Fertilization. Is a polar body different from an egg?

In Parthenogenesis that happens by automixis "the replication of an egg by meiosis and the transformation of the haploid egg to a diploid cell occur by fusion with a polar body." =https://www....