Questions tagged [genetics]

Genetics is the branch of biology that deals with the transmission and variation of inherited characteristics.

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189 views

Why are there different species of bacteria?

The usual (high school or intro to bio) explanation for diversification of species comes from multicellular, usually sexually reproducing organisms, and seems to be closely tied to the biological ...
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452 views

How should one interpret heritability? Is it related to $R^2$?

From Wiki: Heritability estimates are often misinterpreted if it is not understood that they refer to the proportion of variation between individuals on a trait that is due to genetic factors. It ...
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54 views

Was the frequency of mutations more during primitive earth due to radioactivity?

Primitive earth was more radioactive (or was it really?) according to radiometric analysis of C14 which suddenly appeared at 4250 million years in the Hadeon eon. Is it possible that ancient high ...
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Incomplete dominance with gain-of-function allele

Can somebody site an example of incomplete dominance with gain-of-function mutation?
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“Signal Advance”: Unsure of meaning or contextual use

I am reading through Recombinant DNA; Genes and Genomes - A Short Course - Third Edition by James D. Watson, et. al. and I came across this paragraph in the discussion about discrete factors of ...
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How to find name of the gene

Considering the kegg page, this page contains the description of the gene Edwardsiella tarda EIB202: ETAE_0074 . Now this gene has a name given in the page as : wabG. Now considering another gene 1 ...
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841 views

mutations induced by transposons

Question: In contrast to chemically-induced mutations, mutations induced by transposons are more likely to ... be lethal de dominant be stable revert to wild types be a gain of function The answer ...
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Serotonin activity with short 5-HTT promotor region and depression

So after reading a few studies (1,2) it seems that a shorter promotor region for the serotonin transport protein may be associated with increased likelihood of developing depression after stressful ...
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241 views

Genetic mapping problem

A prototrophic Hfr strain of E. coli with the genotype trp+ purB- pyrC+ is conjugated with an F- strain with the genotype trp- purB+ pyrC- . The trp gene is known to enter last. The following numbers ...
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Meaning of “pure” in “pure plant DNA” (horizontally transferred to bacteria in soil conditions)

The abstract of Transformation of Acinetobacter baylyi in non-sterile soil using recombinant plant nuclear DNA, by Simpson et al., 2007: To provide estimates of horizontal gene transfer from ...
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46 views

Will someone with a double mutation in the allosomes be normal?

Normally a female human has an X allosome from her father and an X allosome form her mother. What if an double mutation happened, which causes that someone has two X allosomes form her mother and no ...
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Evolution of a Population

Scientists observe a newly established population of sexually reproducing plants growing on the shore of a small island. An observable trait of the plant has two possible phenotypes. It is determined ...
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63 views

There are 6 classifications of CFTR mutations. Is a causal relationship to the sweat test known?

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene for the protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The CFTR mutations are classified in 6 classes. The sweat test is ...
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66 views

What will happen to transcription if histone acetyltransferases are removed from a eukaryotic cell?

If HATs are destroyed in a eukaryotic cell, how will gene expression level be affected? Will all gene expression be affected or just be slowed down and most gene will still be expressed?
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What are the white spots?

What are these white spots? It's like Braille writing or something. How is the appearance encoded in the plant? (which I think is a Pine, though I am not sure).
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Is this description of etiology of celiac disease correct?

There is a detailed and, to my inexpert eyes, plausible description of the etiology of celiac disease and other autoimmune disorders posted here: http://no-gluten.org/CeliacDisease.htm Is it is at ...
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610 views

Blood type frequency given probability

I have calculated the probability that any child will have a particular blood type from both the genotype level and the phenotype level assuming the human ABO Rh system is followed. Here are the ...
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54 views

Word denoting genetic state

Is there a single word, or brief phrase, that denotes the state of the total genetic machinery (genome + transcriptome + proteome + ...) of a cell or organ or organism at a particular point in time?
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821 views

Can sealed epiphyseal growth plates theoretically be restored via epigenetic or genetic methods?

I know that epiphyseal growth plates seal up once people become young adults and that it is currently impossible to restore them to actively produce new bone growth but, is it theoretically possible ...
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822 views

An unknown band appearing in my gel electrophoresis

I am having trouble understanding what is the source of band "2" in the following gel-electrophoresis: In this experiment, we took an E.coli transformant colony and ran its nucleic acids in the gel, ...
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95 views

Can a heterozygous allele show non-heterozygous expression in a family?

I'm doing a family study looking for novel cancer-associated variants in germ-line samples; the goal is to find candidate biomarkers which might be used for early detection. At an earlier step our ...
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1k views

Why only able to close one eyelid? Genetic reason?

Eye-dominance is a critical thing with bows: right-eye-dominant is recommended to do the aiming on the right eye here otherwise inaccuracy. This made me think whether all people are even able to do ...
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70 views

Which disorders are fully concordant?

I work in neuroscience, mostly Alzheimer's disease (AD), with some work in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The work is in gene regulation and epigenomics. I'm familiar with monozygotic twin (MZ) ...
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377 views

What is neutral genetic differentiation?

What is neutral genetic differentiation? Presumably it's a measure of the distance between organisms in terms of their genetics, but what does 'neutral' refer to?
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Genotypes without Recombination

When given that the parent generation's genotypes are linked traits, how do you determine the genotypes of the F1 generation when no recombination has occurred. For example, given the parents BbNn ...
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How to build SEG in your personal environment?

I'm trying to implement SEG (Wootton & Federhen,1993) in my MATLAB and Python environment. From this oriinal article I cannot figure out what I need to build my script. Are there any related ...
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23 views

Why is the 5′ end of DNA a monophosphate?

According to my textbook: While the 5′ end of a DNA strand is typically a monophosphate, the 5′ end of an RNA molecule is typically a triphosphate. Source: Biology: How Life Works, 3rd Edition How ...
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Pre-Mendelian genetics

In the 18th century, Joseph Gottlieb Kölreuter concluded from his plant experiments that in some hybrid generations the characteristics of grandmother generation, grandfather species and F1 generation ...
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How do the CFTR alleles interact within an individual with Cystic Fibrosis when mutations of different classes are present?

So mutations in CF are classified by the severity of the impact on the production of the CFTR. But an individual may have two different CFTR mutations. I assume that the least severe mutation of the ...
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46 views

Why is cannibalism not an evolutionary stable situation?

In the 'the selfish gene' Dawkins writes (page 109): "The reason lions do not hunt lions is that it would not be an ESS (evolutionary stable situation) for them to do so. A cannibal strategy would be ...
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Cell division in primordial eucaryotes

The evolution of eucaryotic cells is usually described as an event wherein one procaryote engulfed another probably smaller procaryote and rather than the engulfed procaryote being taken apart the two ...
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If there is such known “Mitochondrial Eve”, does it means that all the mitochondrial dna in everyone's body is same?

P.S. I know not that much, just some basics, but this question really interested me :)
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genetics question

In mice, the waltzing allele (w) that causes the mouse to run in circles due to an inner ear defect is recessive to the non-waltzing allele (W). If a heterozygous mouse mated with a waltzing mouse, a)...
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my way of solving the biology question

Pure-breeding tall and pure-breeding short pea plants in the P generation were crossed as shown below. Based on the diagram below, one can assume that a)short plant height is the dominant trait. b)...
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About genomic imprinting

In the context of genomic imprinting, how does a human cell "know" whether a chromosome is paternal or maternal(out of a homologous pair), in order to silence genes?
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23 views

What does this mean?

The phenotypic ratio of dihybrid cross 9:3:3:1 can be derived as a combination series 3 yellow: 1 green, with 3 round :1 wrinkled. This derivation can be writtenbas follows: (3 round :1 wrinkled) (...
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Tips on sexing of a pet Green Anole? (Besides length)

So I'm looking into lizard breeding (Mainly Leopard Geckos and Anoles) I catch wild ones and also buy them around, but some of them are very close in size and length. I have some males that I know ...
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Term for a phenotype “restricted to a few cells”

Is there a term for a phenotype that is defined or restricted to a single cell/a few cells/a small patch of tissue? As opposed to defined by the whole organism. Eg. morphology of macrophages (...
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Modeling the production of mRNA

I have the following example of how an equation for the production of mRNA in a particular organism could look like: Consider the following equation for the production of mRNA for a gene Y. Gene Y ...
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What factors make iSCNT less effective than SCNT?

When comparing the efficiency of SCNT vs iSCNT, specifically what percent of transfers that generate a living animal; it appears that genetic distance between the receiving cytoplasm and the donor ...
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48 views

Research on chicken that cannot feel pain

In was having a conversation about the ethics of vegetarianism, and if it is right to cause pain to other animals. It is then that I stumbled upon the question, that if, just the way chicken and many ...
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Why does polyploidy occur during failure of cytokinesis and not during failure of karyokinesis?

Polyploidy is increase by a whole set of chormosomes, Cytokinesis is the process of splitting the cell cytoplasm and polyploidy is the splitting of the nuclear mass. Now I ask why polyploidy occurs ...
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47 views

Will a less favorable allele's frequency go to 0?

For example, a pond is dark in color. There are two alleles. The dark color allele is dominant over the light color one. Let's assume that the relative fitness of both the homozygous dominant and ...
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How quickly does recombination shuffle chromosomes?

For each pair of homologous chromosomes, one was inherited from the father and one from the mother. If there were no recombination in meiosis, one could then say that one of the chromosomes was ...
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Do haplotypes have a role to play in the aggression of a human?

there are a couple research papers that connect haplotypes and aggressiveness in canines. Our genes, for example the MAOA gene in the X-chromosome, have also been shown to affect aggression. But can ...
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53 views

What is the probability that a gamete will only contain father's chromosomes

As it is depicted in most textbooks, cross-over does not occur between the two "outer" sister chromatids. By independent assortment during Meiosis I, there is 1/2^23 chance that all father's ...
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Can men with Klinefelter syndrome produce chromosomally normal sperm?

Individuals with Klinefelter syndrome are XXY. Even though sperm counts are low some individuals can generate enough to be used in IVF and have offspring. Does this mean that when sperm are formed, ...
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Why do individuals vary in the number of SNPs for a given gene ( e.g. FOXO3A )?

Individual #1, sequenced by 23andMe and then inputed into Promethease for SNP data has the following SNP output: 1) rs1935949(C;T) 2) rs2802292(G;T) 3) rs13217795(C;T) 4) rs13220810(C;T) 5) rs2764264(...
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Genes where both a disabling mutation and copy number amplification cause different genetic diseases

I'm trying to make a list of such genes, because they must be tightly regulated. MeCP2 is one - it causes Rett Syndrome with a disabling mutation, but causes MeCP2 duplication syndrome if its copy ...
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Which sample type is more proper for whole genome sequencing in AML patients? Peripheral blood or bone marrow?

I intend to perform whole genome sequencing in AML patients in order to find genomic abnormalities, particularly translocation and gene fusions. However, I am not sure whether it is better to obtain ...

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