Questions tagged [hearing]

Hearing is the ability to perceive sound by detecting vibrations through an organ such as the ear.

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13 views

Are children's ears more vulnerable to loud noise than adults?

I am interested , what are child's ear development stages? Do newborns' have already developed (defensed) ear like adults have and there is no much difference with regard being vulnerable toward ...
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Are there any animals that are unable to hear the human voice?

Humans and animals have different hearing ranges. The frequency range of a human, for example, is stated with 20 Hz to 20 kHz, whereas the fundamental voice frequency is stated with 125 Hz for men, ...
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Do kids under a certain age not hear the warning beeps that smoke detectors make when they are running out of battery power?

I've always been very annoyed by those regular single beeps that smoke detectors start doing increasingly often as the batteries start to run out, to warn (and annoy) the user to replace the batteries....
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61 views

Why/how does exposure to noise cause cochlear hair-cell loss?

I am trying to understand why listening to loud music - e.g. concerts or earphones at high volume damages hearing. According to the National Institute on Deafness the cause is physical. Most ...
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23 views

What is the purpose of descending auditory signals from the brain?

What might the purpose be of the brain having descending auditory signals from the brain? My textbook is very vague about this and I am just curious.
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22 views

Is reverse tonotopical organisation possible?

In human cochlea tonotopical organisation is that higher frequency sounds are detected near the entrance whereas lower frequency sounds are deep inside the cochlea. Is this tonotopical organisation (...
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Can Chilopoda “vocalize” or produce sound for the express purpose of communication, as opposed to sound as a byproduct of other movements?

Is there any species of Chilopoda that can "vocalize" or or otherwise produce sound for the express purpose of communication, as opposed to sounds it might create as a byproduct of other movements ...
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416 views

Why are mammals the only animals with pinnae / outer ears?

Yes, I know owls have feathery "ear tufts", but these are less suited for hearing and more for display. And I find it hard to believe that animals like dinosaurs or other cursorial archosaurs would ...
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Are there gaps in what our ears can hear?

I know about the hair cells in our Cochlea and it is the movement of the fluid that makes them vibrate. And it is this that activates the transmission of electrical signals to the brain that become ...
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What causes “ear rumbling”?

The video Ear rumbling happens below the range of human hearing demonstrates that the "ear rumbling" sound is actual sound and can be recorded by a sensitive microphone near the ear. What is it ...
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1answer
294 views

How far does eardrum move?

Sound waves move human eardrum back and forth, like the peak to peak excursion of speaker driver, how much is it though? Ofcourse this movement depends on sound pressure, frequency and even location ...
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78 views

Can a brain process auditory signals at 18 weeks of human development?

According to When a fetus hear , When a baby can hear in the womb and several other similar articles, a baby starts to hear sounds at week 18. And according to How hearing works. Hearing involves ...
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How are sound waves amplified while traveling within the cochlea?

How are sound waves amplified while traveling from the basal membrane to apical membrane within the cochlea? Are they amplified by the movement of the stapes?
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1answer
86 views

Could one hear without his ear?

Might be a stupid question, but I'm quite curious about finding out ^^ If someone looses his ear, or for example cuts it of, just as Van Gogh did. Would he still be able to hear, since the actual ...
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115 views

Volley theory and sound amplitude/power

Assume a pure tone (single frequency) is listen, lets say 2 kHz. If I understand correctly the temporal theory (aka timing theory), in a cochlea neuron the action potentials create a signal that will ...
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234 views

What is the signal conversion from hair cells to cochlear nerve cells?

If I understood correctly, inner hair cells generates a graded potential (receptor potential), this potential maps the stereocilia deflection. On the other hand, the cochlear nerve cells transmit ...
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Are mosquitoes actually louder than similar flying insects, or have we evolved to hear them?

I've come across many flying insects smaller than the common housefly, but (anecdotally) the only such species that I can hear from an appreciable distance away is the mosquito, with its distinctive ...
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85 views

Why don't we hear all the processes in our body and what prevents us from doing so?

Why don't we hear all the processes in our body (like the rushing of our bloodcells through our arteries, the pumping of our heart, the electricity of neurotransmitters or our brain cells, etc.) Is ...
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Sound volume drop when falling asleep in an airplane

Note: This question has nothing to do with pressure change. When I'm flying in an aircraft at cruising altitude, the monotonous sound often lulls me to sleep. I've noticed that just as I am on the ...
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1answer
77 views

Pitch perception - why is the missing fundamental not directly detected in the cochlea?

I'm learning about pitch perception, and learned about the case of the missing fundamental. In the main image in that wikipedia page, it seems like the bottom graph, with the fundamental frequency ...
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1answer
145 views

Is the masking effect of sound related to action potentials or to mechanical aspects of hearing?

I am an applied mathematics / signal processing engineer who wants to learn more and I have a question that has been bugging me for some time. It is known in audio coding circles that human hearing is ...
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1answer
337 views

When did the mammalian outer ear evolve?

All Eutheria and Metatheria have outer ears, and as far as I found out, monotremes once also had them, so they seem to be universal for mammals. Did other synapsids have them, too? I know that soft ...
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204 views

What happens when I pop my ears?

What happens when my ears are popped? I understand it increases the air inside there which makes my volume louder, what happens after that, do my ears gradually readjust back to the air pressure that ...
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1answer
138 views

Is it the theory of the 5 senses obsolete? [closed]

An enigmatic topic in traditional science was labelled as the mystery of the 5 senses, and how to best group senses by type. Is that theory now meaningless? Do Scientists still agree that that ...
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Validity of Acoustic Weapon Effects on Biological Organisms?

There is alot of rather contradictory information present on the biological effects of acoustic weapons with a bevy of scientific articles claiming that they cause harm to biological organisms with ...
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440 views

Why are the neurites from hair cells to spiral ganglion cells called axons?

In Kandel's Principles of Neural Science I found the following figure which shows the innervation of the organ of Corti: From the legend to this figure (30-10, p. 602): "The great majority of ...
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How does the human ear guess the direction of the source? [duplicate]

Suppose a sound is produced behind you. You can easily tell that the sound came from behind. Our ear lobes face towards the front and hence traps the sound waves which come from the front. Yet, we ...
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3answers
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What happens to the human ear as it naturally goes deaf?

I was always told that when the human ear goes deaf to a specific sound (auditory frequency), then that sound is heard one last time, and upon fading away, will never be able to be heard again. Is ...
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Empty room, Room full with stuffs & Auditory adaptation to reflection of sounds

Background When a room is full with stuffs like furniture, electronic utilities, books etc. it's hard to hear reflections of sounds made by us (talking, playing an instrument, sound from falling ...
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106 views

How can humans hear low frequency sounds using the cochlea which is tiny compared to wavelength?

Humans can reportedly hear sounds as low as 31 Hz. If we consider the speed of sound in air to be 1125 feet per second, then a sound at 31 Hz will have a wavelength of about 36 feet. Normally, to ...
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571 views

Curved membrane effect

Curved Membrane effect: Movements of the tympanic membrane are more at the periphery than at the centre where malleus is attached which provides some leverage. This is called as curved membrane ...
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2k views

Why is it that I can understand speech through one ear better than the other ear?

First, I do a lot of music so I'm used to pick up details in sound and I have had hearing tests showing that my ears are quite well balanced, for my age, without any dead spots. When I am in a social ...
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1answer
73 views

What are the effects on hearing of in ear headphones?

I have been told many times by my teachers and grandparents that using in ear headphones will ruin my hearing, but I was unsure of these claims. So of course I turned to stack exchange to help me. So ...
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Does the cactus wren use a call to elicit insect prey movement and detection?

I will be referring primarily to a 2013 paper, If a bird flies in the forest, does an insect hear it?, and my own investigation. Bird flight sound frequencies overlap with the hearing range of most ...
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316 views

In what range do humans generally interpret sound best?

I am currently working on a speech recognition frameworks. A generally used feature used in speech recognition are MFCC features, which uses the mel scale to extract features with. The mel scale ...
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3answers
328 views

What is the term for awareness of or inclusion of real sounds within a dream?

I fell asleep while listening to a podcast, and I am sure I was dreaming but I could also still hear the podcast. The podcast played an important role in the dream, I was searching for the source of ...
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1answer
31 views

Does size correlate with sensory abilities?

On average, do smaller animals have senses inferior to those of bigger animals? I ask because it seems like a somewhat logical assumption: smaller eyes would in theory collect less light, and smaller ...
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591 views

High frequency tone/ringing in movies/music and its effects [closed]

I was watching a horror movie and I noticed during a scene that there was a high pitched noise playing in the background. It had been playing for a while before I noticed it and when I took notice it ...
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113 views

Why do I hear beatings with stereo headphones?

When I play a sine wave together with another pitch shifted sine wave I hear the beating very clearly. This is the expected physical phenomenon. When I use headphones to play the lower frequency ...
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947 views

Why do oviparous animals not have ears?

I was chatting with my friend, and we both found that there's a relation between putting eggs and ears; we count animals and we found that if an animal is oviparous (birds, snakes, etc.), then it does ...
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693 views

How much does hearing deteriorate with age?

For the average person, what is the lowest volume of a pure tone at each frequency they can hear as a function of age? I know some people lose hearing faster than other people, because they are ...
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6k views

What is the purpose of the incus?

The three bones in the middle ear -- the malleus, the incus, and the stapes-- play a role in transmitting sound waves to the inner ear (the cochlea). I understand that the malleus is the bone closest ...
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350 views

Is brain plasticity such that we can train ourself to see with our ears?

I am finishing writing some code which will parse a photo (eventually video) and use all the RGB information to synthesize an audio representation. I am wondering whether a typical person has ...
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Why don't we hear ultrasonic sounds as aliased versions of the original signals?

The upper limit of hearing is approximately 15 kHz, dependent on age and other factors. According to the principles of digital signal-processing, such an upper limit would mean that the auditory ...
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How we can localize sound vertically (up-down) and front-to-back?

It is quite simple to understand the concept of lateral localization of sound. It depends upon the loudness and time (and wave phase) difference between 2 ears. But how can we detect front-back ...
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9k views

Why is the human ear most sensitive to 4000 Hz tones?

Human hearing sensitivity is dependent on frequency, which can be visualized by equal-loudness (iso-loudness) contour plots. An example is given below (Taken from here). This plot shows that a tone ...
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86 views

Potentials between endolymph/cytoplasm and endolymph/perilymph

I am studying for an exam and there is something I can't seem to understand. My textbook says that the endolymph contains 150mM potassium, 2mM Na+ and 130mM Cl-. The perilymph contains 5mM potassium, ...
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118 views

Are our ears more sensitive to low or high pitched sounds?

I am a Physics student who also love music and learned a little bit about Medical Physics. I know that the basilar membrane in the cochlear duct enables us to distinguish different frequencies. The ...
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2k views

What causes the tonotopic organization of the inner ear?

I'm trying to understand why tones are registered in the way that they are in the inner ear, i.e., why are high pitched sounds sensed at the base of the cochlea and low frequencies in the apex? I've ...
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What is the exact percentage of spectral changes that human pinnae introduces into the acoustic input signal?

I read somewhere that amount of spectral changes that human auricula introduces into the input signal is 6%. Now I cannot find that literature. Does anyone know a source that might confirm this, or ...