Questions tagged [hematology]

The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

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How many hematopeietic stem cells (in percentage) does the bone marrow contains?

I've found out that the body marrow of an adult weights about 5% of it's total weight. How much (%) of the bone marrow consists of hematopeietic stem cells and how much consists of other non-...
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Why are red blood cells considered to be cells?

Wikipedia states that a cell is the basic structural, functional and biological unit of all known living organisms. Cells are the smallest unit of life that can replicate independently. It then ...
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63 views

Pressure measurement blood flow

During blood pressure measurement, when the flow within the arteries of the arm is interrupted, how is blood flow redistributed to the rest of the circulatory system? Is it possible that more blood ...
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How far up a limb can a severed artery retract?

This is about the application of tourniquets. I was taught a hand width above wound, but recently I read severd arteries can in some cases retract higher than that which would then bleed into the arm. ...
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A disease which is characterised by polycythemia and thrombocytopenia at the same time

I've read that polycythemia vera is associated with increased levels of RBC, WBC and/or platelets, but is there a disease associated with high levels of RBC and low levels of platelets?
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647 views

Determine the chances of blood group type and rhesus factor of unknown parent?

First of all, I'm not a biologist so my jargon might not exactly be common on this site. I'm a programmer and as a hobby project I try to make an algorithm that does two things: Determine the ...
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2answers
63 views

What is the mass of a single erythrocyte?

I really have been searching through internet on different languages, but can’t find any article that answers on the question what is the single erythrocyte mass. I don’t know, I think it’s pretty ...
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12k views

Can a person survive on blood in place of water?

This question: Can you get enough water by eating only fish? asks if a person could survive on fish alone. Can a person survive on fish and/ or blood alone of any species if stuck at sea or animal ...
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What is blood pH for different animals?

So we all know that humans average blood pH is 7.4. But is it the same for the animals? I need examples of animals with the same blood pH as humans and the ones with different blood pH. I guess dogs ...
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If heparin is an anticoagulant, how is its effect nullified upon exposure to air?

First of all, does heparin always remain in circulation? Or is it specifically released by the mast cells and basophils upon activation? Adding to that, if it always stays in circulation, why is its ...
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1answer
29 views

How does the choice of blood draw site influence the possible specificity of a serological test?

The news has reported that a new serological test for the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies has received an emergency use authorization from the FDA, and notably has a higher specificity than ...
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Edema and hydrostatic pressure

I'm currently studying Robbins basic pathology, and I'm confused about a specific statement: It states in the book that when hydrostatic pressure is low due to a lack of albumin synthesis, it leads ...
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1answer
111 views

What causes the localization of myoglobin in turkey to regions of muscle tissue?

I've read that myoglobin localization is responsible for the darker colour of leg muscles in turkeys. Why does this localization occur in terms of any of cell biology, molecular biology, or ...
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What happens to blood after a person dies?

After a human dies, what happens to their blood? I know that it tends to accumulate in the lower areas of the body, whichever parts are closest to the ground, but I am wondering about coagulation. ...
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2answers
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Could bone marrow transplants help make xenotransplants viable?

So the immune system doesn't calibrate (for want of a better euphemism) to recognize it's own cells until fairly well along in fetal development & the major components of the immune system (...
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2answers
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Why does the affinity of haemoglobin for oxygen decrease at high altitudes?

My class 12 NCERT book says, Pg 226 The body compensates low oxygen availability by increasing red blood cell production, decreasing the binding affinity of haemoglobin and by increasing breathing ...
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Can erythrocytes Function without plasma?

my title is not very specific. So i will proceed to clarify it. I am trying to make sure that the only blood cells in a sample are Erytocytes, since i want to evaluate their metabolism, I am aware ...
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2answers
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Why is prothrombin time test not used for heparin

Prothrombin time test is used for the monitoring of warfarin but not heparin. Why is this used for warfarin monitoring and why is it not used for heparin monitoring?
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Why do red blood cells maintain Iron in the Haem group in the +2 (ferrous) oxidation state?

A lot of sources tell me that RBCs contain a number of enzymes, and that these serve multiple functions from maintaining the structure and elasticity of the corpuscle wall, to preventing the oxidation ...
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Is there any situation where bloodletting should be paired with transfusion?

Clearly, bloodletting only has benefits in a couple of rare instances —— for example promoting blood flow into reattached tissues1. But could it (or, should it) realistically be used along with ...
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1answer
766 views

Which type of test tube should not be used for blood collection?

The following question is presented in my biology textbook: You are required to draw blood from patient and keep it in a test tube for analysis of blood corpuscles and plasma. You are provided with ...
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1answer
60 views

How much heme is in cooked pork and beef; why is cooked pork (“the other white meat”) not red?

The new video See how Impossible Pork will make you forget about pig meat includes a very short discussion of the addition of heme to the product to make it taste like beef the deep red color of a ...
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How do you sanitize blood for use in a BSL-1 lab?

I do research in a BSL-1 (biosafety level 1) lab, though I have access to a BSL-2 lab if needed (though very inconveniently). I'm doing medical research with the goal of identifying biomarkers for ...
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7k views

Is there a purpose for nucleated red blood cells in reptile, avian and fish blood?

I have read, and read, and read documents on this subject but still have no conclusions. Everything I have read explains why mammals don't have a nucleus (to make more room for the haemoglobin and ...
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Is blood donation risky for patients with MGUS?

Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) is often considered a pre-cancerous condition. Blood donors with MGUS are typically advised to discontinue blood donation as their blood may be ...
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1answer
4k views

Is it possible to condition the body to reduce bruising?

I do combat sports, and in these sports there are a lot of hits that can cause bruising. I've found that, over time, physical conditioning can reduce and/or eliminate the bruising to the point where ...
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1answer
38 views

How is plasmin formed from plasminogen?

In Ganong's Review of medical physiology it is mentioned that plasminogen is converted to active plasmin when tissue type plaminogen activator hydrolyses the bond between Arg560 and Valine 561. Can ...
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1answer
90 views

How does blood pressure substantially drop in the capillaries and arterioles?

Is this due to increased frictional resistance which decreases the velocity of the blood? You would think using Bernoulli's principle that the velocity of blood in the capillaries would increase due ...
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Would gargling with salt water every day increase blood sodium levels?

Would gargling and rinsing with salt water every day for a few minutes increase your blood sodium levels? Considering the fact that sublingual medication is a very effective way for introducing ...
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3answers
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Does animal blood, esp. human, really have similar salinity as ocean water, and does that prove anything about evolution?

It is an often-repeated claim that human, and in fact all animal blood is salty because we evolved from aquatic organisms, and that blood has a similar concentration of salts as ocean water, or at ...
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Where can I find extensive information on animal blood types and transfusions?

I'm interested in doing research on different animal blood types, including blood transfusion across different species. What are some resources you could recommend for me?
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Why do people with type O blood have anti-A and anti-B antibodies?

People with type O blood have anti-A and anti-B antibodies, even without receiving a transfusion. Why?
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2k views

What is the difference between Amino acids from blood and urine?

I would like to understand the difference between different tests for Amino Acids. Any blood laboratory offers amino acids tests using 3-4 methods Blood serum Urine Random Urine 24 hour (all the ...
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How much does capillary action contribute to blood flow to the human brain?

The BBC News Universal Wonders short video Why water is one of the weirdest things in the universe says after 01:50: Water molecules can float upwards against the ...
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1answer
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Non-nucleated cell-like population with RNA

We're working on invertebrate hemolymph (blood) and we have found with flow cytometry (staining with DRAQ5) a cell-like population without nucleus but it has RNA production. Does anyone any ...
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1answer
562 views

Why are red blood cells not attacked by NK cells?

All cells containing a nucleus present MHC-I, while some specialized cells present MHC-II in addition to that. Since erythrocytes lack any MHC why do natural killer cells not attack them? It is my ...
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1answer
226 views

How are monocytes larger than capillaries?

I have read that the average size of a capillary is about 8 micrometers. How is it possible that the 15 micrometer or so monocytes in blood do not block these vessels? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
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1answer
236 views

How can a child be blood type AB, if both of the parents are blood type A?

Basically, both of my parents are blood type A (both are confirmed and it's also certain both of them are my biological parents). I recently found out my blood type is AB. How is this possible? I ...
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2answers
30k views

What happens if an IV drip with a saline solution slips out of the vein, but keeps dripping into the body?

A patient has a saline solution IV drip into the vein. They have somehow moved around and the needle has fallen out of the vein, but remained in the body. Nobody has noticed and for a few hours water ...
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3answers
6k views

What part of food gives the blood red color?

Roughly, what I know is, when we eat food it goes into our: Stomach > Small Intestine > Large Intestine > Rectum. So, it just moves through a digestive pipe. What I don't understand is, what part of ...
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875 views

Why does an increased heart rate mean increased blood pressure?

Say a person starts exercising. If their cardiac volume remains the same but their heart rate increases so that the overall result is an increase in cardiac output, will their blood pressure increase ...
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Blood groups - why is O the universal donor and AB the universal recipient? [closed]

I do not understand why individuals with type O- blood are often called universal donors and those with type AB+ blood are called universal recipients. My thoughts on this are: It should be that ...
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1answer
262 views

When endothelial cells in blood vessels (arteries or veins) are damaged, does atheroma form first or blood clot?

I have learnt from Khan Academy's video on atheresclerosis that when the endothelial cells of an artery are damaged, atheroma forms at the site, and if the atheroma’s fibrous cap is ruptured, ...
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1answer
5k views

What will happen if a foetus is Rh- and the mother is Rh+?

If a mother has Rh-negative blood and her foetus has Rh-positive blood it will result in rhesus incompatibility and lead to erythroblastosis fetalis. What will happen if the reverse occurs, when a ...
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1answer
100 views

How do veins's valve pocket sinus tend to become hypoxic?

For context, this question relates to the formation of deep vein thrombosis as I read that hypoxemia in vein can trigger coagulation cascade and cause a thrombus to form in vein. I read that vein's ...
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Is there other unknown-compound in Blood?

Blood is made of red blood cells, platelets, plasma etc. Let's say, then, there are these $x$ known compounds in blood. But how can one be sure that there is no other compound other than those $x$ ...
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4answers
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Is there any advantage to one blood type over another?

All humans can be grouped into ABO and Rh+/- blood groups (at a minimum). Is there any advantage at all to one group or the other? This article hints that there are some pathogens that display a ...
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Realistic Application of CRISPR in Human Disorders

Human trials recently began to use the genome editing technology CRISPR to treat sickle cell anemia using edited stem cells. Sickle cell anemia is caused by a single DNA Mutation, and is also a ...
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1answer
132 views

Blood consumption

Is consumption of blood more "dangerous" compared to meat? There was a news-article about unnatural chemicals found in the blood of mothers. This reminded me about a question I have pondered upon ...
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1answer
36 views

Why does atheroma contain thromplastin/tissue factor?

From my understanding, when the endothelial lining of arteries is damaged, atheroma is formed at the site of the damaged area. If the atheromas is ruptured, thromboplastin contained in atheroma is ...

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