Questions tagged [hematology]

The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

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Does donating blood lower testosterone levels? [closed]

I'm a guy and I decided to donate blood because of persuasion. My testicles feel weak afterwards specifically. I mean they feel like they're compensating -- assuming that makes sense. Is this because ...
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1answer
273 views

What are null cells?

My histology textbook says the following: The pluripotential hemopoietic stemm cell (which resembles a lymphocyte) is a member of the null cell population of lymphocytes. It then goes on to add: ...
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Why do erythrocytes have no MHC1 but platelets do?

Red blood cells do not have a considerable number of MHC1 through their membranes, and that's explained by them not having a nucleus. But why do platelets have MHC1s if they have no nucleus either? I ...
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1answer
96 views

Blood Group Notation

In a textbook, I encountered a notation used when writing blood groups down, which was "I" with the blood group type as a superscript. I was curious as to why the letter "I" is used in this notation ...
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Why women have high Erythrocyte sedimentation rate? [closed]

Why ESR (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate) 1. higher in women 2. increases with age 3. increases in pregnancy, infection, malignancies what I thought so far : since women are menstruating so there ...
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1answer
180 views

Meaning of red blood cell volume expansion

In the scientific papers about EPO I read RBC volume (mL) expansion. What is it? The volume of a single cell or the volume expansion (=that is the increase of the number of cells) caused by the EPO? ...
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Is there a purpose for nucleated red blood cells in reptile, avian and fish blood?

I have read, and read, and read documents on this subject but still have no conclusions. Everything I have read explains why mammals don't have a nucleus (to make more room for the haemoglobin and ...
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32 views

What's the difference in roles of GATA-2 and BMI-1 in guiding Hematopietic cells?

I've discovered that hematopoietic cells become lineage-positive (Lin+) and go down the path of becoming lymphoblasts and myeloblasts, and that both BMI-1 and GATA-2 are transcription factors that ...
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633 views

Where does the extra blood in arterial circulation when exercising come from? [closed]

When exercising more blood is in our arterial circulation. Where did this blood come from and how did it get there ?
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399 views

Why is the pressure pulse bigger after exercise?

Right after exercise, is the amplitude of the pulse smaller or bigger than resting period? And why is that ?
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what is the word origin of myelo- as in myelofibrosis or myeloma?

what is the word origin of myelo- as in myelofibrosis or myeloma? I know that these are plasma cancers originating in the bone marrow.
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226 views

What is “multiple” myeloma?

Multiple myeloma, commonly referred to as myeloma, is a cancer of the plasma cells found in the bone marrow.(source) Is there any significance in calling myeloma as "MULTIPLE" myeloma?
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What's the smallest animal with hemoglobin running in its veins?

What's the smallest known animal with hemoglobin running in its veins? Here I mean an animal that on its own is able to produce the hemoglobin that is running in its veins. For that reason this ...
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Does drinking water from stainless steel increase hemoglobin?

I'm pretty sure iron molecules will be present in water. Cooks who use iron or stainless steel pots increase the amount of iron they consume
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82 views

Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency

Triose phosphate isomerase deficiency, a rare condition, is the only glycolytic enzymopathy that is lethal. This deficiency is characterized by severe hemolytic anemia and neurodegeneration. How can ...
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1answer
576 views

Effect of forced breathing on RBC size

Microcytosis, i.e. decrease in the size of RBCs occurs: – In iron deficiency anaemia, – During prolonged forced breathing and – When osmotic pressure of the blood is increased. I am ...
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2answers
921 views

Why does high EDTA concentration cause swelling of platelets?

According to this textbook, high ( >2mg/ml of blood) EDTA concentration causes swelling of platelets which lead to their fragmentation. I know that high concentration of EDTA increases plasma ...
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4answers
709 views

Why does an increased heart rate mean increased blood pressure?

Say a person starts exercising. If their cardiac volume remains the same but their heart rate increases so that the overall result is an increase in cardiac output, will their blood pressure increase ...
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1answer
991 views

How is the probability of Rh type inheritance calculated?

I found somewhere on the Internet that, if parents are both Rh-positive, their children have 93.75% chance of being RH-positive and 6.25% chance of being RH-negative. My question is: How is this ...
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1answer
460 views

Human anti animal antibodies issues in blood testing

Do people have to be exposed to animals to get HAMA antibodies? Can these antibodies impact blood tests with false negatives as well as false positives?
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1answer
230 views

What evolutionary reason is there for hemolytic disease?

Nowawadays we have methods which allow us to overcome hemolytic disease of newborn or to prevent it to onset. The Rh or Kell conflict, but how is it possible that it is present? Why it haven't ...
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94 views

What does factor VIII have to do with thromboplastin formation?

I've got the following question and I'm afraid that the question doesn't match with the answer... Factor III (rather than factor VIII) is known as thromboplastin or tissue factor and it makes sense ...
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1answer
556 views

Determine the chances of blood group type and rhesus factor of unknown parent?

First of all, I'm not a biologist so my jargon might not exactly be common on this site. I'm a programmer and as a hobby project I try to make an algorithm that does two things: Determine the ...
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1answer
43 views

Arteries used for inserting catheter

For catheter purpose, femoral and subclavian arteries are mostly used as starting point. Why? Are there other arteries which are used for the purpose?
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Why do people with type O blood have anti-A and anti-B antibodies?

People with type O blood have anti-A and anti-B antibodies, even without receiving a transfusion. Why?
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92 views

Is human blood useful as food?

Lacking other resources, could a healthy adult slit his wrist to feed a starving child with his blood? Would it be nutritional and would a starving dehydrated child eat it?
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What are preparation mistakes that could make red blood cells appear crenate in isotonic solution?

Thank you for your time. I separated red blood cells from a whole blood sample purchased from a blood bank. In isotonic solution, the red cells appear crenate. I would like to know if there is ...
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1answer
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Can Blood Types Change?

I recently heard a radio show where two callers claimed that their blood types had changed. One caller claimed that he was born O-, but recent tests said he was A+. Another caller claimed to change ...
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1answer
138 views

How does one experimentally obtain a hemoglobin-oxygen dissociation curve?

I've always wanted to do comparative eco-physiology studies looking at Hemoglobin-Oxygen affinity of populations in different environments, but I can't find a protocol to experimentally measure the ...
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Can you bleed from your bones?

I was talking to my science teacher about the body specifically the red bone marrow. She said that blood is created in the red bone marrow. Does that mean that if you were to cut a fresh bone open ...
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1answer
199 views

Roughly at least, how many types of cells comprise human blood?

A long time ago there were only three kinds - red, white, and rose platelets. Advances in cell sorters and more recently in genetic techniques and differentiation studies have led to the ...
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What could be the reason for the large difference between sodium and potassium blood concentrations?

Reference values for sodium and potassium concentrations in blood tests are usually in the range of 135-145 mEq/L and 3.5-5.1 mEq/L, respectively. My question is what could be the reason for this (...
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1answer
129 views

Reusing frozen blood [closed]

Considering the short supplies of blood in hospitals, why can't we freeze on our blood from time to time and and have it stocked for reuse in an emergency? That could make ourselves responsible for ...
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46 views

Why is thrombin time longer than prothrombin time? [duplicate]

Thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT) are two different clinical measures of blood plasma coagulation. Both clotting tests end with the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin; however, the TT ...
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How pulmonary vasculature removes embolism?

This book says: Pulmonary vasculature removes emboli before they reach into systemic circulation. I can speculate that if the emboli are made of fat or clot then our body could degrade it but how ...
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1answer
115 views

What is the difference between ferritin and hemoglobin?

I have been reading that ferritin is the store of iron but hemoglobin is actually the amount of this in blood. Does hemoglobin get sourced from ferritin? Is it possible for a person to be low on ...
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Non-splenic pools of erythrocytes?

In splenectomized animals, where could red blood cells be released from, to explain an increased hematocrit after exercise or muscular contractions?
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2answers
146 views

Are there any exceptional cases in which a person with O negative blood group cannot donate?

Are there any exceptional cases in which a person with O negative blood group cannot donate or any case in which compatibility might not be established between O negative an any other blood group?
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Effect of 2,3-bisphophoglycerate (2,3-BPG) on haemoglobin

When 2,3-bisphophoglycerate (2,3-BPG) binds to haemoglobin, a higher partial pressure of oxygen is needed to bring about 50% saturation of with oxygen. What is the physiological significance of this ...
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1answer
697 views

Is blood donation risky for patients with MGUS?

Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) is often considered a pre-cancerous condition. Blood donors with MGUS are typically advised to discontinue blood donation as their blood may be ...
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1answer
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A hypothetical emergency situation

This question was posed to me by my Biology teacher: Consider a hypothetical emergency situation of a person shot by a bullet in the heart. The bullet goes into the body and comes out from it, ...
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1answer
452 views

What is the speed of blood in when flows through the fingertip?

What is the average speed of blood as it flows through the index finger on the right hand?
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128 views

Are there endoscopic technologies for blood vessels?

Endoscopic procedures are used to look inside cavities like intestine, esophagus etc. Is it being used to look inside blood vessels?
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Hemoglobin oxygen affinity curve

I have a general understanding of the Bohr effect, and that Hemoglobin's affinity for oxygen will shift depending on the conditions of the lungs and tissues. However, I'm struggling with the following ...
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1answer
582 views

Why do people perceive blood pressure as the force that moves the blood forwards (see details)?

For example "Veins contain a lot of valves because the blood pressure inside them is low.". This wouldn't make any sense unless if blood pressure was perceived as the force that drives the blood ...
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1answer
76 views

Is it possible to completely puncture a human hand and have no blood come out?

Illusionist David Blaine sometimes performs a trick where he takes a very long and thin ice pick, insterts it in his hand, and comes out the other side (the palm). However, there is no blood present. ...
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1answer
104 views

Can we use cancer cells to generate blood vessels?

Is there any possibility to use cancer cells, which generate blood vessels, to generate our blood vessels when we are wounded or when we have varicose veins in our legs? Thanks for your answer in ...
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1answer
116 views

What do bloodsucking animals actually feed on?

A number of animals, including mosquitos, leeches, ticks and so on, feed on blood. And yet, at least in mammals, most stored nutrients can be found in body fat as fat, muscles and liver as glycogen ...
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Iron deficiency anemia [duplicate]

It is said that iron deficiency anemia is characterised by microcytic-hypochromic RBCs. I would like to ask how iron deficiency causes decrease in the volume of RBCs? If the volume is decreasing ...
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0answers
254 views

Why is blood pressure different in different parts of our blood vessels? [closed]

Why does it change throughout our circulatory system ?