Questions tagged [hematology]

The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

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What is the mechanism of aspirin as an anticoagulant? [duplicate]

I understand that aspirin prevents blood clots from forming by interfering with the clotting action. I want to know at which stage aspirin interferes with clot forming and what really happens in the ...
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CML (Chronic Myeloid Leukemia) and blast cell percentage

I'm trying to understand the oncogenesis of CML. I have a question about CFC cells and blast cells. Are those the same? I know that in the chronic phase of CML there is a blast percentage of 1-10% of ...
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What if blood pressure is raised by glucose instead of salt?

According to this medium article, glucose damages blood vessels while vitamin C repairs them. Unfortunately, glucose is preferred over vitamin C causing big inconveniences for people who have diabetes ...
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If you add type A blood to type B blood, is there a visible reaction?

I read that the original discovery of blood types was because they combined random blood samples togethers and noticed a reaction. I was wondering if this was a visible reaction? Or is anti-A or anti-...
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Why is the blood thick in Wet Cupping / Hijama

I have just witnessed the wet cupping procedure being performed and have questions regarding the blood that is seen in the cups. I understand there are no studies that show cupping is an effective ...
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How many hematopeietic stem cells (in percentage) does the bone marrow contains?

I've found out that the body marrow of an adult weights about 5% of it's total weight. How much (%) of the bone marrow consists of hematopeietic stem cells and how much consists of other non-...
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How far up a limb can a severed artery retract?

This is about the application of tourniquets. I was taught a hand width above wound, but recently I read severd arteries can in some cases retract higher than that which would then bleed into the arm. ...
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A disease which is characterised by polycythemia and thrombocytopenia at the same time

I've read that polycythemia vera is associated with increased levels of RBC, WBC and/or platelets, but is there a disease associated with high levels of RBC and low levels of platelets?
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What is the mass of a single erythrocyte?

I really have been searching through internet on different languages, but can’t find any article that answers on the question what is the single erythrocyte mass. I don’t know, I think it’s pretty ...
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What is blood pH for different animals?

So we all know that humans average blood pH is 7.4. But is it the same for the animals? I need examples of animals with the same blood pH as humans and the ones with different blood pH. I guess dogs ...
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How does the choice of blood draw site influence the possible specificity of a serological test?

The news has reported that a new serological test for the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies has received an emergency use authorization from the FDA, and notably has a higher specificity than ...
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If heparin is an anticoagulant, how is its effect nullified upon exposure to air?

First of all, does heparin always remain in circulation? Or is it specifically released by the mast cells and basophils upon activation? Adding to that, if it always stays in circulation, why is its ...
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Edema and hydrostatic pressure

I'm currently studying Robbins basic pathology, and I'm confused about a specific statement: It states in the book that when hydrostatic pressure is low due to a lack of albumin synthesis, it leads ...
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What causes the localization of myoglobin in turkey to regions of muscle tissue?

I've read that myoglobin localization is responsible for the darker colour of leg muscles in turkeys. Why does this localization occur in terms of any of cell biology, molecular biology, or ...
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Can erythrocytes Function without plasma?

my title is not very specific. So i will proceed to clarify it. I am trying to make sure that the only blood cells in a sample are Erytocytes, since i want to evaluate their metabolism, I am aware ...
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Is there any situation where bloodletting should be paired with transfusion?

Clearly, bloodletting only has benefits in a couple of rare instances —— for example promoting blood flow into reattached tissues1. But could it (or, should it) realistically be used along with ...
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Pressure measurement blood flow

During blood pressure measurement, when the flow within the arteries of the arm is interrupted, how is blood flow redistributed to the rest of the circulatory system? Is it possible that more blood ...
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Which type of test tube should not be used for blood collection?

The following question is presented in my biology textbook: You are required to draw blood from patient and keep it in a test tube for analysis of blood corpuscles and plasma. You are provided with ...
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How much heme is in cooked pork and beef; why is cooked pork (“the other white meat”) not red?

The new video See how Impossible Pork will make you forget about pig meat includes a very short discussion of the addition of heme to the product to make it taste like beef the deep red color of a ...
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How do you sanitize blood for use in a BSL-1 lab?

I do research in a BSL-1 (biosafety level 1) lab, though I have access to a BSL-2 lab if needed (though very inconveniently). I'm doing medical research with the goal of identifying biomarkers for ...
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How is plasmin formed from plasminogen?

In Ganong's Review of medical physiology it is mentioned that plasminogen is converted to active plasmin when tissue type plaminogen activator hydrolyses the bond between Arg560 and Valine 561. Can ...
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Would gargling with salt water every day increase blood sodium levels?

Would gargling and rinsing with salt water every day for a few minutes increase your blood sodium levels? Considering the fact that sublingual medication is a very effective way for introducing ...
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Does animal blood, esp. human, really have similar salinity as ocean water, and does that prove anything about evolution?

It is an often-repeated claim that human, and in fact all animal blood is salty because we evolved from aquatic organisms, and that blood has a similar concentration of salts as ocean water, or at ...
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Where can I find extensive information on animal blood types and transfusions?

I'm interested in doing research on different animal blood types, including blood transfusion across different species. What are some resources you could recommend for me?
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How much does capillary action contribute to blood flow to the human brain?

The BBC News Universal Wonders short video Why water is one of the weirdest things in the universe says after 01:50: Water molecules can float upwards against the ...
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Non-nucleated cell-like population with RNA

We're working on invertebrate hemolymph (blood) and we have found with flow cytometry (staining with DRAQ5) a cell-like population without nucleus but it has RNA production. Does anyone any ...
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Why are red blood cells not attacked by NK cells?

All cells containing a nucleus present MHC-I, while some specialized cells present MHC-II in addition to that. Since erythrocytes lack any MHC why do natural killer cells not attack them? It is my ...
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How are monocytes larger than capillaries?

I have read that the average size of a capillary is about 8 micrometers. How is it possible that the 15 micrometer or so monocytes in blood do not block these vessels? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
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Can a person survive on blood in place of water?

This question: Can you get enough water by eating only fish? asks if a person could survive on fish alone. Can a person survive on fish and/ or blood alone of any species if stuck at sea or animal ...
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How does blood pressure substantially drop in the capillaries and arterioles?

Is this due to increased frictional resistance which decreases the velocity of the blood? You would think using Bernoulli's principle that the velocity of blood in the capillaries would increase due ...
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When endothelial cells in blood vessels (arteries or veins) are damaged, does atheroma form first or blood clot?

I have learnt from Khan Academy's video on atheresclerosis that when the endothelial cells of an artery are damaged, atheroma forms at the site, and if the atheroma’s fibrous cap is ruptured, ...
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How do veins's valve pocket sinus tend to become hypoxic?

For context, this question relates to the formation of deep vein thrombosis as I read that hypoxemia in vein can trigger coagulation cascade and cause a thrombus to form in vein. I read that vein's ...
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Is there other unknown-compound in Blood?

Blood is made of red blood cells, platelets, plasma etc. Let's say, then, there are these $x$ known compounds in blood. But how can one be sure that there is no other compound other than those $x$ ...
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Are there health benefits to donating blood?

Donating blood is typically thought of as a commensal act, benefiting the recipient at no cost beyond time and inconvenience to the donor. Some even view it as a parasitic act, wherein the recipient ...
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Why does atheroma contain thromplastin/tissue factor?

From my understanding, when the endothelial lining of arteries is damaged, atheroma is formed at the site of the damaged area. If the atheromas is ruptured, thromboplastin contained in atheroma is ...
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288 views

Lobed Nuclei still count as One nucleus?

Do the Lobed Nuclei of immune cells (such as Megakaryocytes) still count as one nucleus?
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Where do Red Blood Cells use energy?

I know that RBCs use glycolysis of glucose to lactate to produce most of their energy, but, if they are just carrier cells, where do they use the energy?
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How can a child be blood type AB, if both of the parents are blood type A?

Basically, both of my parents are blood type A (both are confirmed and it's also certain both of them are my biological parents). I recently found out my blood type is AB. How is this possible? I ...
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Can blood that has had an anticoagulant added to it be boiled without coagulating?

If I understood the information I've found elsewhere correctly, you can't boil untreated blood without it coagulating, right? But what if you added an anticoagulant to it? Would it be possible to boil ...
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What are the effects of oxygen toxicity in human blood?

I was reading some text on deep sea Physiology, and for to know that diving to do could cause oxygen toxicity in the blood. This was the exact text from the book Textbook of Medical Physiology by ...
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In adverse effects of Heparin, why is bleeding from deeper organs more common?

The reason given in my book is that it i because it interferes with the secondary hemostasis..but i did not understand how that implies that bleeding from deeper organs is more common..
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Could bone marrow transplants help make xenotransplants viable?

So the immune system doesn't calibrate (for want of a better euphemism) to recognize it's own cells until fairly well along in fetal development & the major components of the immune system (...
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How does the cardiac cycle and electrical activity all relate to blood pressure in the heart? [closed]

I know how the cardiac cycle works and understand the electrical activity in the heart such as the AV nodes, SA nodes and Bundles, but how do they work together in relation to blood pressure?
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Does blood carry metallic nanoparticles?

I find this particular chart about constituents of blood very informative and interesting. Looking through the different components, I see metals such as copper, zinc, etc. Are these only carried as ...
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How does vasodilation slow blood flow?

During inflammation, cytokines and histamine cause vasodilation to increase blood flow to the inflamed area. However, it is also said that vasodilation slows blood flow which facilitates the adhesion ...
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Realistic Application of CRISPR in Human Disorders

Human trials recently began to use the genome editing technology CRISPR to treat sickle cell anemia using edited stem cells. Sickle cell anemia is caused by a single DNA Mutation, and is also a ...
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Can a cancerous cell from outside cause cancer in a healthy person?

If a cancerous cell enters the body of a healthy person from someone else's blood or something, will that healthy person get cancer? In human beings.
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Why is there low hepcidin levels in hemochromatosis?

If hemochromatosis is iron overload and there is excess iron in the blood, why does the liver reduce hepcidin secretion (which increases the iron uptake) furthering the worsening of hemochromatosis?
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What's the difference between a lymphocyte and a plasma cell?

According to my understanding, lymphocytes is the broad terminology for both T lymphocytes as well as B lymphocytes, while plasma cells refers to mature B cells which produce antibodies. But then why ...
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Why is beta thalassemia major not lethal while alpha thalassemia with loss of all 4 genes lethal?

So why is beta thalassemia major with two B0 alleles not fatal in utero (despite the hemoglobin not having any B chains), while alpha thalassemia with deletion of all 4 genes encoding for the alpha ...

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