Questions tagged [hematology]

The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

60 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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142 views

Found in blood sample - what is it? Hopefully not a nemotode-

After examining someone's blood - through microscope - I found these. There were some more that were not photographed. Could someone please inform me on what these are? Maybe abiotic material on the ...
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94 views

Realistic Application of CRISPR in Human Disorders

Human trials recently began to use the genome editing technology CRISPR to treat sickle cell anemia using edited stem cells. Sickle cell anemia is caused by a single DNA Mutation, and is also a ...
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160 views

Does drinking water from stainless steel increase hemoglobin?

I'm pretty sure iron molecules will be present in water. Cooks who use iron or stainless steel pots increase the amount of iron they consume
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63 views

What could be the reason for the large difference between sodium and potassium blood concentrations?

Reference values for sodium and potassium concentrations in blood tests are usually in the range of 135-145 mEq/L and 3.5-5.1 mEq/L, respectively. My question is what could be the reason for this (...
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87 views

Do High Triglycerides Invalidate Tests for Infections?

Blood donation websites tell you to avoid eating fats a few days before the donation, because when there is a lot of fat in the blood, they can't test for infectious diseases and must discard the ...
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48 views

Does blood typing still provide a use for ancient tissue analysis?

Modern techniques. In recent years, DNA sequencing has become extremely cheap. This, compounded by the ability to PCR miniscule samples to viable samples for analysis, means that aDNA can be ...
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34 views

If you add type A blood to type B blood, is there a visible reaction?

I read that the original discovery of blood types was because they combined random blood samples togethers and noticed a reaction. I was wondering if this was a visible reaction? Or is anti-A or anti-...
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31 views

How many hematopeietic stem cells (in percentage) does the bone marrow contains?

I've found out that the body marrow of an adult weights about 5% of it's total weight. How much (%) of the bone marrow consists of hematopeietic stem cells and how much consists of other non-...
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46 views

Is there other unknown-compound in Blood?

Blood is made of red blood cells, platelets, plasma etc. Let's say, then, there are these $x$ known compounds in blood. But how can one be sure that there is no other compound other than those $x$ ...
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32 views

Are there health benefits to donating blood?

Donating blood is typically thought of as a commensal act, benefiting the recipient at no cost beyond time and inconvenience to the donor. Some even view it as a parasitic act, wherein the recipient ...
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18 views

What are these flower like cells in the photo attached?

I am a student of BSc. Zoology... I was doing a TC of RBC of my blood when I encountered these strange flower like cells. Are they lysed RBCs ? If so, why are they so geometric in shape ?
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275 views

Why do erythrocytes have no MHC1 but platelets do?

Red blood cells do not have a considerable number of MHC1 through their membranes, and that's explained by them not having a nucleus. But why do platelets have MHC1s if they have no nucleus either? I ...
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101 views

Is human blood useful as food?

Lacking other resources, could a healthy adult slit his wrist to feed a starving child with his blood? Would it be nutritional and would a starving dehydrated child eat it?
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1k views

Is blood donation risky for patients with MGUS?

Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) is often considered a pre-cancerous condition. Blood donors with MGUS are typically advised to discontinue blood donation as their blood may be ...
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88 views

Does capillary blood pressure have any effect on how much oxygen or nutrient gets distributed to tissues?

From what I have read regarding blood pressure and blood flow, I've come to the conclusion that, apart from the osmolarity of blood, the only determinant of how much oxygen/nutrients the tissues get ...
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5k views

Chart of blood pH across different animal species?

How does blood pH vary across species? I can't find an article or chart listing this kind of information. So far I've found bits and pieces like: Human blood pH is nominally 7.4. 7.4 seems to be a ...
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75 views

Blood sampling at home

I want to collect small blood samples at regular intervals (e.g. every 8 hours or more often) over a longer period (weeks to months). To avoid having to go to a lab or doctor to have this done, I want ...
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563 views

Proteases in the blood

I’m reading on hormones and the book talks about how peptide or amine hormones are easily broken down by proteases present in the blood plasma. This has led me to question the interactions between ...
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49 views

Do High Iron Stores (but within the healthy range) Make Sun Exposure Damage Worse?

Ultraviolet damage from sun exposure is related to the creation of free radicals. Iron is often involved in exacerbating damage by free radicals. Having lower iron stores is associated with reduced ...
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74 views

How to gauge the clinical significance of specific cell type presence?

How does one decide whether the presence of certain cell types is clinically important or negligible? Would the presence of certain cells in conjunction with other symptoms be enough, or should it be ...
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87 views

Does apheresis damage any components of blood? If not, why not?

Blood donation involving apheresis is becoming increasingly common. It looks like the process involves centrifuging blood at very high speeds* before removing the desired fraction and returning the ...
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1answer
146 views

What is the difference between ferritin and hemoglobin?

I have been reading that ferritin is the store of iron but hemoglobin is actually the amount of this in blood. Does hemoglobin get sourced from ferritin? Is it possible for a person to be low on ...
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25 views

Edema and hydrostatic pressure

I'm currently studying Robbins basic pathology, and I'm confused about a specific statement: It states in the book that when hydrostatic pressure is low due to a lack of albumin synthesis, it leads ...
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87 views

What's the difference between a lymphocyte and a plasma cell?

According to my understanding, lymphocytes is the broad terminology for both T lymphocytes as well as B lymphocytes, while plasma cells refers to mature B cells which produce antibodies. But then why ...
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32 views

Why do I feel nauseous at the sight of blood, despite not being afraid of it?

Every time I ask google this question, all it spits at me is info on blood phobias ^-^; basically, I've always been hugely interested in morbid stuff, but I noticed that I always feel sick when ...
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30 views

why is erythrocyte sedimentation rate higher in females?

erythocyte sedimentation rate should be independent of the sex. what is the reason behind this sex bias and why does it increase during pregnancy and how does age influence it.
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73 views

How does blood react to heat when inside the body

I was wondering: What are the possible dangers of being burned on the surface of the skin. Does it congeal (that's what my intuition tells me)? At which temperature would that happen? How heat-...
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420 views

Is carbon dioxide dissolved in plasma same as carbonic acid?

Carbon dioxide is transported through blood via 3 methods : 1. Dissolved in plasma 2. As bicarbonate ion 3.through RBCs. The carbondioxide when transported as bicarbonate ion i.e HCO3- and H+. What ...
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24 views

Do Marsupials have a standard classification system for their blood groups?

I've seen a limited amount of animal blood groups listed...like dogs, cats, horses, etc. But what blood types do marsupials have? To clarify, what I want to know is if the species has a ...
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41 views

What's the difference in roles of GATA-2 and BMI-1 in guiding Hematopietic cells?

I've discovered that hematopoietic cells become lineage-positive (Lin+) and go down the path of becoming lymphoblasts and myeloblasts, and that both BMI-1 and GATA-2 are transcription factors that ...
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105 views

What are preparation mistakes that could make red blood cells appear crenate in isotonic solution?

Thank you for your time. I separated red blood cells from a whole blood sample purchased from a blood bank. In isotonic solution, the red cells appear crenate. I would like to know if there is ...
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13 views

Non-splenic pools of erythrocytes?

In splenectomized animals, where could red blood cells be released from, to explain an increased hematocrit after exercise or muscular contractions?
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72 views

How does the composition of blood cell types in human blood change during our lifetimes?

I was reading the paper Age-related accrual of methylomic variability is linked to fundamental ageing mechanisms. There they do additional checks to see that their results are not due to differing ...
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17 views

HSC Cycling Rates

I would like to know how often human hematopoietic stem cells go into cycle in the bone marrow niche (with a paper reference). I have heard they cycle 1-2 times per year but has anyone robustly ...
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33 views

Could drugs promoting angiogenesis be used as a treatment for burn victims?

From what I've learned from my textbooks and in class lecutures it seems that inducing angiogenesis for people with severe burns would be an excellent way to speed up the healing process. Is this ...
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48 views

What Effect Does Skin Redness Have On Underlying Tissue?

When someone applies a rubefacient ( something that increases blood flow to the skin, turning it red), what effect does this have on the underlying tissue? Is blood supply increased radially from ...
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3k views

What's the difference between blood value units 'mE/l', 'mU/l', 'mIU/l' and 'mEq/l'?

Wikipedia suggests 'mE/l' is the dutch or german translation (using 'eenheid'/'einheit' for 'unit') for 'mU/l', which can also be written as 'mIU/l'. The article mentions ...
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135 views

Plateletpheresis for hemophilia

Plateletpheresis is seperation of platelets from whole blood and putting the leukocytes and erythrocytes back into the blood. If the person donating platelets does not have hemophilia than could a ...
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27 views

CML (Chronic Myeloid Leukemia) and blast cell percentage

I'm trying to understand the oncogenesis of CML. I have a question about CFC cells and blast cells. Are those the same? I know that in the chronic phase of CML there is a blast percentage of 1-10% of ...
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19 views

How far up a limb can a severed artery retract?

This is about the application of tourniquets. I was taught a hand width above wound, but recently I read severd arteries can in some cases retract higher than that which would then bleed into the arm. ...
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11 views

A disease which is characterised by polycythemia and thrombocytopenia at the same time

I've read that polycythemia vera is associated with increased levels of RBC, WBC and/or platelets, but is there a disease associated with high levels of RBC and low levels of platelets?
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12 views

What is blood pH for different animals?

So we all know that humans average blood pH is 7.4. But is it the same for the animals? I need examples of animals with the same blood pH as humans and the ones with different blood pH. I guess dogs ...
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44 views

If heparin is an anticoagulant, how is its effect nullified upon exposure to air?

First of all, does heparin always remain in circulation? Or is it specifically released by the mast cells and basophils upon activation? Adding to that, if it always stays in circulation, why is its ...
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34 views

Is there any situation where bloodletting should be paired with transfusion?

Clearly, bloodletting only has benefits in a couple of rare instances —— for example promoting blood flow into reattached tissues1. But could it (or, should it) realistically be used along with ...
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2answers
88 views

Pressure measurement blood flow

During blood pressure measurement, when the flow within the arteries of the arm is interrupted, how is blood flow redistributed to the rest of the circulatory system? Is it possible that more blood ...
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17 views

How do you sanitize blood for use in a BSL-1 lab?

I do research in a BSL-1 (biosafety level 1) lab, though I have access to a BSL-2 lab if needed (though very inconveniently). I'm doing medical research with the goal of identifying biomarkers for ...
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25 views

Would gargling with salt water every day increase blood sodium levels?

Would gargling and rinsing with salt water every day for a few minutes increase your blood sodium levels? Considering the fact that sublingual medication is a very effective way for introducing ...
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15 views

Where can I find extensive information on animal blood types and transfusions?

I'm interested in doing research on different animal blood types, including blood transfusion across different species. What are some resources you could recommend for me?
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55 views

What happens to neutrophils in whole blood stored for transfusion?

The lifetime of neutrophils is normally quite short, 3-5 days in vivo (link). On the other hand, whole blood can be stored for a fairly long time, up to 35 days (link). What happens to neutrophils ...
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110 views

What does factor VIII have to do with thromboplastin formation?

I've got the following question and I'm afraid that the question doesn't match with the answer... Factor III (rather than factor VIII) is known as thromboplastin or tissue factor and it makes sense ...