Questions tagged [hematology]

The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

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7
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1answer
308 views

How does a glucose molecule enter the cell from blood vessel?

The transporters in the plasma membrane of the cells promote the entry of glucose molecules from the extracellular matrix to the cytosol of the cell. Could someone explain how does the nutrient ...
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25 views

why is erythrocyte sedimentation rate higher in females?

erythocyte sedimentation rate should be independent of the sex. what is the reason behind this sex bias and why does it increase during pregnancy and how does age influence it.
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2answers
99 views

Is too much CO2 in the air toxic?

I know that if there is too much CO2 in the air we will have too much greenhouse effect. I would like to know if there is too much CO2 in the room, something like 3% while there is also more that ...
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2answers
2k views

Iron deficiency anemia symptoms explanation

In my classes and on the internet, brittle nails and dry hair (or hair loss) are described as symptoms of iron deficiency anemia, but none explains the cause of such symptoms. Does anyone have any ...
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1answer
1k views

What percentage of human capillaries are located in the skin?

As in the subject line, what percentage of capillaries in a human (expressed in terms of total length, I suppose) are located in the skin, as opposed to internal organs? Google scholar has not turned ...
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1answer
47 views

Why should collected blood from patients be analyzed as soon as possible?

I'm looking for the possible factors influencing blood samples. What happens to the blood cells esp. WBCs/PBMCs after 8 hours of blood draw? For example, I know that granulocytes may cause oxidative ...
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1answer
363 views

Why does applying pressure to a venipuncture site prevent haematoma?

From what understand, when drawing blood, a phlebotomist puts pressure on the venipuncture site while withdrawing the needle to prevent a haematoma. I'd like clarification; How does this prevent a ...
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2answers
449 views

Does the oxygen concentration equilibrate between red blood cells in the liver sinusoids?

In the sinusoids of the liver, venous blood from the hepatic portal system mixes with arterial blood from the hepatic arteries. Do oxygen molecules move between oxygenated RBCs and non-oxygenated ...
3
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1answer
108 views

What would the RBCs of someone heterozygous for sickle cell anemia look like?

Would half of the RBCs look normal, and the other half sickled? Or would all of the RBCs have slight deformation/sickling? Thanks!
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1answer
2k views

Sickle cell life span

How long do sickle red blood cells "live" before being broken down in phagocytosis? I had trouble doing a normal search as it brings up life span of those inflicted with the disease. Also, I have ...
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1answer
62 views

Turbulence in blood

Turbulence in blood flow is known to indicate diseased or obstructed arteries. Techniques to measure turbulence in blood flow are mostly based on turbulence kinetic energy measurments using MRI [e.g., ...
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1answer
2k views

How do genetic chimeras with different blood types not die?

If a person is a chimera and has two different blood types in his veins, how does he not die? Shouldn't the immune system attack one of the blood types? In 1953 a human chimera was reported in the ...
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0answers
120 views

Found in blood sample - what is it? Hopefully not a nemotode-

After examining someone's blood - through microscope - I found these. There were some more that were not photographed. Could someone please inform me on what these are? Maybe abiotic material on the ...
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2answers
2k views

what is the word origin of myelo- as in myelofibrosis or myeloma?

what is the word origin of myelo- as in myelofibrosis or myeloma? I know that these are plasma cancers originating in the bone marrow.
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66 views

How does blood react to heat when inside the body

I was wondering: What are the possible dangers of being burned on the surface of the skin. Does it congeal (that's what my intuition tells me)? At which temperature would that happen? How heat-...
3
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1answer
51 views

How do drugs tests check so many substances?

There are about 170 drugs banned for sports and many other drugs that can be used in crimes. How can blood tests practically detect so many different substances? Do they divide the sample into 170 ...
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2answers
2k views

Why does Anti-A antibodies make type-A blood type clump?

A-type blood has B-antibodies; it also clumps anti-A antibodies are inserted. Why is that? The blood has no antibodies against the A-antibodies to make clump in this way.
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1k views

Why isn’t Haemoglobin a plasma protein, rather than being encompassed by the erythrocyte?

Erythrocytes (red blood cells) are a common feature of almost all vertebrates. What evolutionary advantage do they provide in containing haemoglobin, rather than it being just a plasma protein? In ...
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1answer
24 views

Mice that have been reconstituted with geneX-transduced cells

I read this article in the following: ... Mice that have been reconstituted with geneX-transduced cells Now, someone who is not familiar with animal sciences, what does this exactly mean? ...
29
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4answers
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Why do we need red blood cells?

From what I know, the main function of red blood cells (RBCs) is hemoglobin transport. So, why do we need cells packed with hemoglobin: why can't it travel freely in the bloodstream? My own thoughts ...
2
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1answer
149 views

How might IV-saline cause kidney damage that seems to be less likely with “balanced fluids” IVs instead?

The ABC News article What's in the IV bag? Studies show safer option than saline includes: Saline — salt dissolved in water — has been the most widely used fluid in the U.S. for more than a century ...
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1answer
107 views

If women need more dietary iron than men, then do blood donors also?

My understanding that women's dietary iron requirements are slightly higher because I've heard the only way of losing iron from your body is by losing blood, and this happens in menstruation. This got ...
6
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3answers
10k views

Why do red blood cells maintain Iron in the Haem group in the +2 (ferrous) oxidation state?

A lot of sources tell me that RBCs contain a number of enzymes, and that these serve multiple functions from maintaining the structure and elasticity of the corpuscle wall, to preventing the oxidation ...
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0answers
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What are these flower like cells in the photo attached?

I am a student of BSc. Zoology... I was doing a TC of RBC of my blood when I encountered these strange flower like cells. Are they lysed RBCs ? If so, why are they so geometric in shape ?
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Is carbon dioxide dissolved in plasma same as carbonic acid?

Carbon dioxide is transported through blood via 3 methods : 1. Dissolved in plasma 2. As bicarbonate ion 3.through RBCs. The carbondioxide when transported as bicarbonate ion i.e HCO3- and H+. What ...
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23 views

Do Marsupials have a standard classification system for their blood groups?

I've seen a limited amount of animal blood groups listed...like dogs, cats, horses, etc. But what blood types do marsupials have? To clarify, what I want to know is if the species has a ...
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1answer
289 views

What are null cells?

My histology textbook says the following: The pluripotential hemopoietic stemm cell (which resembles a lymphocyte) is a member of the null cell population of lymphocytes. It then goes on to add: ...
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1answer
579 views

Determine the chances of blood group type and rhesus factor of unknown parent?

First of all, I'm not a biologist so my jargon might not exactly be common on this site. I'm a programmer and as a hobby project I try to make an algorithm that does two things: Determine the ...
5
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1answer
3k views

Effect of 2,3-bisphophoglycerate (2,3-BPG) on haemoglobin

When 2,3-bisphophoglycerate (2,3-BPG) binds to haemoglobin, a higher partial pressure of oxygen is needed to bring about 50% saturation of with oxygen. What is the physiological significance of this ...
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1answer
5k views

Why does the affinity of haemoglobin for oxygen increase at higher elevations?

Why does the affinity of haemoglobin for oxygen increase if an organism lives at a higher elevation where the oxygen pressure is lower? Wouldn’t its affinity for oxygen decrease because the acidity ...
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1answer
274 views

Why is blood collected at crime scenes? [closed]

I have read that mature red blood cells (MRBs)do not have DNA. So I am curious why crime scene technicians collect blood. Is it to collect and amplify segments of white blood cells?
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3answers
6k views

Do animals other than humans have different blood types?

Humans have the ABO and Rhesus blood typing systems. I have two questions about it: Why have we evolved these blood types? Do other animals have different blood types as well?
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53 views

What happens to neutrophils in whole blood stored for transfusion?

The lifetime of neutrophils is normally quite short, 3-5 days in vivo (link). On the other hand, whole blood can be stored for a fairly long time, up to 35 days (link). What happens to neutrophils ...
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1answer
495 views

Veins collapse when empty

Veins collapse when empty. That's because they have thin and almost inelastic walls. What has inelasticity and thinness of the walls to do with the collapsing of the veins?
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2answers
41k views

Can the mating of a couple with Rhesus positive and negative blood types result in miscarriage?

Can the combination of $+ve$ and $-ve$ blood groups of a couple be a cause of miscarriage in pregnancy?
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1answer
4k views

Does donating blood lower testosterone levels? [closed]

I'm a guy and I decided to donate blood because of persuasion. My testicles feel weak afterwards specifically. I mean they feel like they're compensating -- assuming that makes sense. Is this because ...
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2answers
24k views

Is blood regarded as an organ?

It consist approximately 7 percent of body weight. By definition organ is composed of multiple tissues. Blood is a fluid, a circulating tissue. Therefore can we call this fluid system a liquid organ?...
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0answers
232 views

Why do erythrocytes have no MHC1 but platelets do?

Red blood cells do not have a considerable number of MHC1 through their membranes, and that's explained by them not having a nucleus. But why do platelets have MHC1s if they have no nucleus either? I ...
2
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1answer
116 views

Blood Group Notation

In a textbook, I encountered a notation used when writing blood groups down, which was "I" with the blood group type as a superscript. I was curious as to why the letter "I" is used in this notation ...
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0answers
3k views

Why women have high Erythrocyte sedimentation rate? [closed]

Why ESR (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate) 1. higher in women 2. increases with age 3. increases in pregnancy, infection, malignancies what I thought so far : since women are menstruating so there ...
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1answer
197 views

Meaning of red blood cell volume expansion

In the scientific papers about EPO I read RBC volume (mL) expansion. What is it? The volume of a single cell or the volume expansion (=that is the increase of the number of cells) caused by the EPO? ...
13
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1answer
9k views

Why does oxygen bind to hemoglobin in an specific angle?

There is an specific angle of the bond between oxygen and hemoglobin in lungs, which I don't know, but what interests me more is the question, why is it specific?
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35 views

What's the difference in roles of GATA-2 and BMI-1 in guiding Hematopietic cells?

I've discovered that hematopoietic cells become lineage-positive (Lin+) and go down the path of becoming lymphoblasts and myeloblasts, and that both BMI-1 and GATA-2 are transcription factors that ...
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1answer
234 views

What evolutionary reason is there for hemolytic disease?

Nowawadays we have methods which allow us to overcome hemolytic disease of newborn or to prevent it to onset. The Rh or Kell conflict, but how is it possible that it is present? Why it haven't ...
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2answers
762 views

Where does the extra blood in arterial circulation when exercising come from? [closed]

When exercising more blood is in our arterial circulation. Where did this blood come from and how did it get there ?
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1answer
445 views

Why is the pressure pulse bigger after exercise?

Right after exercise, is the amplitude of the pulse smaller or bigger than resting period? And why is that ?
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1answer
239 views

What is “multiple” myeloma?

Multiple myeloma, commonly referred to as myeloma, is a cancer of the plasma cells found in the bone marrow.(source) Is there any significance in calling myeloma as "MULTIPLE" myeloma?
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2answers
532 views

What's the smallest animal with hemoglobin running in its veins?

What's the smallest known animal with hemoglobin running in its veins? Here I mean an animal that on its own is able to produce the hemoglobin that is running in its veins. For that reason this ...
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0answers
123 views

Does drinking water from stainless steel increase hemoglobin?

I'm pretty sure iron molecules will be present in water. Cooks who use iron or stainless steel pots increase the amount of iron they consume
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1answer
83 views

Triosephosphate isomerase deficiency

Triose phosphate isomerase deficiency, a rare condition, is the only glycolytic enzymopathy that is lethal. This deficiency is characterized by severe hemolytic anemia and neurodegeneration. How can ...