Questions tagged [hematology]

The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

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5
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2answers
527 views

Can antibodies be formed against white blood cells after blood transfusion?

If antibodies are produced against other blood groups' red blood cells, why can't antibodies form against white blood cells, of any blood group? (even the same one, as MHC will be different in almost ...
42
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3answers
80k views

Why draw blood from veins rather than arteries?

Why draw blood from veins rather than arteries? Is it more convenient or safer?
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0answers
44 views

Evolution of blood types [duplicate]

What are the popular theories regarding how our blood divided into 4 groups. Particularly I'm interested in whether this was originally linked to disease. Thanks for your answers, useful articles and ...
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1answer
1k views

Blood after death

After the heart stops beating, do the red and white blood cells and the other cellular elements in the blood become non-functional immediately? Or does it take time? Would clotting occur after death?
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346 views

White blood cell transfusion

Some patient who have low White blood cells need WBC Transfusion do resist infections. What is interesting, doesn't transfused WBCs cause temporary autoimmune disease ? Like recognising patients ...
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0answers
67 views

Proteins and Blood Acidification

Is there evidence to suggest that excessive consumption of Whey, or similar proteins will lead to acidification of the blood?
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2answers
202 views

What are blood group determinants? [closed]

I am trying to understand if they are the same as the blood antigens. The books I have tried to read say something about them being the antigens on the surface of the red blood cell.
5
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1answer
268 views

Lack of A/B-antigen equivalent to Rhesus disease

Rhesus disease occurs when an Rh- mother is exposed to Rh antigens (often due to blood contact with an Rh+ child during delivery) and mounts an immune response which eventually results in the ...
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0answers
1k views

Saline solution for animals

A popular "well-known fact" is that all creatures on Earth consist mostly of water (i.e. H2O). Indeed, a liquid called "normal saline solution" is just a solution of 0.9% sodium chloride in distilled ...
3
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1answer
1k views

Why is the administration of exogenous Anti-D not harmful to the foetus?

Haemolytic disease of the newborn can result from Rhesus incompatibility in utero. In this disease a Rh-ve mother becomes exposed to the antigens of a Rh+ve foetus by fetomaternal haemorrhage causing ...
3
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0answers
87 views

Do High Triglycerides Invalidate Tests for Infections?

Blood donation websites tell you to avoid eating fats a few days before the donation, because when there is a lot of fat in the blood, they can't test for infectious diseases and must discard the ...
6
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1answer
1k views

Parents are Rh +ve and child Rh -ve

Suppose the two parents of a child have blood groups A+ve and O+ve, and the child has O-ve type. For blood group, there are two alleles. Since the child has O, the father must have one 'A' allele and ...
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0answers
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What's the difference between blood value units 'mE/l', 'mU/l', 'mIU/l' and 'mEq/l'?

Wikipedia suggests 'mE/l' is the dutch or german translation (using 'eenheid'/'einheit' for 'unit') for 'mU/l', which can also be written as 'mIU/l'. The article mentions ...
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1answer
152 views

Consuming animals by slaughtering vs injecting barbiturates?

In "Least painful way to die" we get an answer ... Companion animals (e.g., dogs and cats): injected barbiturates are recommended Laboratory animals (e.g., mice and rats): injected ...
-2
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1answer
358 views

Cellular components of blood cells [closed]

There are different types of blood cells in the human body i.e. red blood cells, neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils, monocytes, T-cells, B-cells. What are the cellular components of these cells? ...
2
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0answers
49 views

Do High Iron Stores (but within the healthy range) Make Sun Exposure Damage Worse?

Ultraviolet damage from sun exposure is related to the creation of free radicals. Iron is often involved in exacerbating damage by free radicals. Having lower iron stores is associated with reduced ...
5
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1answer
225 views

Any evolutionary explanation for human blood groups?

What is the explanation of people having blood types from an evolutionary perspective?
2
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1answer
282 views

White blood: cells concentration

Anyone knows of a table with average concentration that can be found in white blood? Something like: Neutrophils - 80% Mast cells - ?% Dendritic cells - ?% B cells - ?% Helper T cells - ?% Killer T ...
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0answers
55 views

Some kind of better oxygen-transport protein or something… Can you help me find it?

I remember reading about artificial or man-made, oxygen-transport protein that is somehow an improvement on hemoglobin, and that it is possibly immune to sickle-cell anemia, or something... But I ...
3
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2answers
660 views

Can leukopenia in a person with an otherwise normal immune system lead to non-infectious diseases in the long-term?

If a person has developed leukopenia as a side-effect of long-term use of anti-convulsant medications and his/her immune system appears normal otherwise (does not get infections any more often than a ...
1
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1answer
2k views

How does the body respond to blood donation; are there any possible risks?

Can blood donation cause any harm to the donor? I have been told so, but cannot find any references supporting this claim. I have also learned that our body will replace the lost fluids within 24 ...
10
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1answer
945 views

Where is the aneurysm in this picture?

I'm a curious person, I've never had any medical training, but I wish to know some more about aneurysms. Aneurysms are basically weakened spots in the elastic artery wall. This can eventually result ...
2
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0answers
74 views

How to gauge the clinical significance of specific cell type presence?

How does one decide whether the presence of certain cell types is clinically important or negligible? Would the presence of certain cells in conjunction with other symptoms be enough, or should it be ...
3
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1answer
568 views

In which of the following diseases structure of haemoglobin produced is normal but their amount reduced?

The options provided are- Chronic blood loss Sickle cell anaemia Haemolytic anaemia Thallasaemia Transfusion reactions - *Q-15: pg-785; **Review of Medical Physiology - William F. ...
3
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1answer
360 views

How do you determine if donated, stored blood is viable?

Think about stored donated blood; What should we check before transfusing it to a patient, to see if blood is still viable? What methods to use? What components should it have in what levels, to be ...
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2answers
4k views

Should hydrogen peroxide be applied on a bloody nose? [closed]

When I was a kid, my parents taught me to apply hydrogen peroxide on my nose whenever it bled. It's a rare event, but my nose bleeds from time to time, and when it does, I always go through the same ...
3
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1answer
263 views

Why oxLDL accumulate to form foam cells?

In atherosclerosis, why macrophage store all the cholesterol from oxLDL inside, and turns to foam cell, and not just degrade it and going back to blood? (there are some amount that leave the plaque, ...
3
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1answer
654 views

How does Hemocytoblast constantly get formed into so many blood cells and yet remains there in the bone marrow throughout the lifetime?

I mean, Hemocytoblast is a stem cell which is constantly being differentiated into daughter cells and leads to formation of all the blood cells (having short and limited life spans), so how come those ...
2
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1answer
452 views

What are the advantages of blood's redness? [closed]

Although this page (http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evosite/evo101/IIIE5aNotadaptation.shtml) denounces the idea that blood's redness is not an adaptation, I remain inquisitive on the matter since no ...
4
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1answer
1k views

Why isn't Rh disease present in other mammals?

I have read about Rhesus D Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn, sometimes called "Rh disease". It's rare, but it can happen when an Rh+ baby is conceived by an Rh- mother. This raises many questions. I ...
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1answer
205 views

How is oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange mediated by hemoglobin? [closed]

Oxygen is transferred by hemoglobin from the lungs to tissues, while carbon dioxide is transferred by hemoglobin from tissues to lungs. How is this regulated bidirectional transfer mediated?
6
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1answer
120 views

Blood cells penetration

Is there a type of blood cell that can reach all other body cells? By "reach", I mean to "touch" the surface of the target cell. If we look at the red blood cell for example, that moves in blood ...
3
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1answer
394 views

How do CO₂ and carbonic acid (H₂CO₃) work in buffering the blood?

Been struggling with this for the past few days even after reading half of the acid base tutorial here, if someone could help me that'd be great. What I don't understand is how HCO3- is supposed to ...
5
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1answer
8k views

Besides hemoglobin, what proteins are present in red blood cells?

I knew that mature red blood cells (RBCs) lacked nuclei, but I wasn't aware until just now that they also lacked ribosomes and mitochondria. Most cells in the human body all contain a common laundry ...
0
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1answer
413 views

What is phenotyping of blood during transfusion process?

Thallaesemic patients are advised to have only "phenotypically matched blood".I mean the transfusion problems arise mainly due to "grouping problems" like mismatch b/w ABO & Rh+/- so what do this ...
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2answers
3k views

Theranos blood test's Specificity and Accuracy?

I am studying the limitations of Theranos device. They have 238 documents in Google Patents Search (Inassignee as Theranos), here. Which patents are relevant for their device? They have 70 tests ...
2
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1answer
110 views

What are the features on a microscope one needs in order to do lab work?

By lab work I mean urinalysis, blood work(live as well), fecals, cytologies, histologies and all other. I have read(partly) a book(from 2002) on lab diagnostics and the author did not mention ...
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1answer
55 views

Could transfusion of a different blood type cure blood-based cancers?

Different antigen detection triggers an immune system response that could perhaps stimulate mitochondria and such in killing cancer cells - something like chemo without the hair-loss?
11
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2answers
24k views

Fate of erythrocytes after splenectomy

The spleen is considered a graveyard for red blood cells. So in case of Splenectomy (complete surgical removal of the spleen), what would be the fate of red blood cells? Would this cause Polycythemia?
9
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3answers
2k views

What is this microscopic image from Peter Gabriel's New Blood album cover?

This image appears on the cover of Peter Gabriel's album New Blood. It appears to be a photograph of some microscopic biological cell. But it doesn't look like a blood cell to me. What kind of ...
3
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4answers
3k views

Antigen Antibody reactions during blood donation

A person wih blood group O is called a Universal Donor. Well, his plasma contains antibodies A and B. During blood donation, if blood group O is given to a person with blood group A (since blood group ...
7
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1answer
12k views

Why extract DNA from certain white blood cells instead of whole blood?

In my lab, human DNA is extracted from whole-blood samples. I don't actually do the extractions and I am not familiar with the specific protocol but I understand that platelets and red blood cells ...
1
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1answer
235 views

Can lymph be in peripheral blood?

I read an argument that 1-3% of lymph is in peripheral blood. However, I am not sure if this lymph is about lymphocytes in peripheral blood; not lymph itself. Lymph gets exchanged between capillaries ...
2
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2answers
587 views

Do females living on mountains have more RBCs than a normal male [closed]

I got this doubt when I was studying about haematocrit value. According to my NCERT textbook males have greater number of RBCs than females. But who will have more RBCs when comparing a normal male ...
1
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1answer
11k views

Carbon Monoxide and High-Oxygen-Affinity Varieties of Hemoglobin

I recently learned about the concept of "affinity" in regards to hemoglobin. For hemoglobin in humans, carbon dioxide has a lower affinity than oxygen, which allows gas exchange to occur in our lungs. ...
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0answers
134 views

Plateletpheresis for hemophilia

Plateletpheresis is seperation of platelets from whole blood and putting the leukocytes and erythrocytes back into the blood. If the person donating platelets does not have hemophilia than could a ...
0
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1answer
97 views

Protoporphyrinogen (IX) formation in heme synthesis

This picture shows one of the steps of heme synthesis. In this step two propanoate groups of coproporphyrinogen III are decarboxylated to form protoporphyrinogen IX. The enzyme that catalyses this ...
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1answer
10k views

Trauma, blood loss and thirst

Back story. Watched an episode of Arctic Air, (season three episode six), where they are practicing and hoping to become a licensed search and rescue airline. Anyhow; two hikers gets attacked by a ...
10
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1answer
290 views

Why do so many people have group O blood?

Please forgive me in case my question wouldn't make much sense. I was reading about ABO blood groups on Wikipedia, where I learnt that O is a recessive allele, and that it seems the A allele predates ...
1
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1answer
38 views

Detecting a Fasting State in the Body via Lasers

I was just wondering wether it would be possible to detect if the body is in a "fasting" state, via lasers attached to the body. If it is possible, what sort of laser would be needed?