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Questions tagged [hematology]

The study of blood, the blood-forming organs, along with blood diseases and their treatment.

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1answer
355 views

Cellular components of blood cells [closed]

There are different types of blood cells in the human body i.e. red blood cells, neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils, monocytes, T-cells, B-cells. What are the cellular components of these cells? ...
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Do High Iron Stores (but within the healthy range) Make Sun Exposure Damage Worse?

Ultraviolet damage from sun exposure is related to the creation of free radicals. Iron is often involved in exacerbating damage by free radicals. Having lower iron stores is associated with reduced ...
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1answer
221 views

Any evolutionary explanation for human blood groups?

What is the explanation of people having blood types from an evolutionary perspective?
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1answer
273 views

White blood: cells concentration

Anyone knows of a table with average concentration that can be found in white blood? Something like: Neutrophils - 80% Mast cells - ?% Dendritic cells - ?% B cells - ?% Helper T cells - ?% Killer T ...
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Some kind of better oxygen-transport protein or something… Can you help me find it?

I remember reading about artificial or man-made, oxygen-transport protein that is somehow an improvement on hemoglobin, and that it is possibly immune to sickle-cell anemia, or something... But I ...
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2answers
637 views

Can leukopenia in a person with an otherwise normal immune system lead to non-infectious diseases in the long-term?

If a person has developed leukopenia as a side-effect of long-term use of anti-convulsant medications and his/her immune system appears normal otherwise (does not get infections any more often than a ...
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1answer
2k views

How does the body respond to blood donation; are there any possible risks?

Can blood donation cause any harm to the donor? I have been told so, but cannot find any references supporting this claim. I have also learned that our body will replace the lost fluids within 24 ...
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1answer
943 views

Where is the aneurysm in this picture?

I'm a curious person, I've never had any medical training, but I wish to know some more about aneurysms. Aneurysms are basically weakened spots in the elastic artery wall. This can eventually result ...
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0answers
69 views

How to gauge the clinical significance of specific cell type presence?

How does one decide whether the presence of certain cell types is clinically important or negligible? Would the presence of certain cells in conjunction with other symptoms be enough, or should it be ...
3
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1answer
482 views

In which of the following diseases structure of haemoglobin produced is normal but their amount reduced?

The options provided are- Chronic blood loss Sickle cell anaemia Haemolytic anaemia Thallasaemia Transfusion reactions - *Q-15: pg-785; **Review of Medical Physiology - William F. ...
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1answer
357 views

How do you determine if donated, stored blood is viable?

Think about stored donated blood; What should we check before transfusing it to a patient, to see if blood is still viable? What methods to use? What components should it have in what levels, to be ...
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2answers
4k views

Should hydrogen peroxide be applied on a bloody nose? [closed]

When I was a kid, my parents taught me to apply hydrogen peroxide on my nose whenever it bled. It's a rare event, but my nose bleeds from time to time, and when it does, I always go through the same ...
3
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1answer
260 views

Why oxLDL accumulate to form foam cells?

In atherosclerosis, why macrophage store all the cholesterol from oxLDL inside, and turns to foam cell, and not just degrade it and going back to blood? (there are some amount that leave the plaque, ...
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1answer
607 views

How does Hemocytoblast constantly get formed into so many blood cells and yet remains there in the bone marrow throughout the lifetime?

I mean, Hemocytoblast is a stem cell which is constantly being differentiated into daughter cells and leads to formation of all the blood cells (having short and limited life spans), so how come those ...
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1answer
387 views

What are the advantages of blood's redness? [closed]

Although this page (http://evolution.berkeley.edu/evosite/evo101/IIIE5aNotadaptation.shtml) denounces the idea that blood's redness is not an adaptation, I remain inquisitive on the matter since no ...
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1answer
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Why isn't Rh disease present in other mammals?

I have read about Rhesus D Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn, sometimes called "Rh disease". It's rare, but it can happen when an Rh+ baby is conceived by an Rh- mother. This raises many questions. I ...
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1answer
203 views

How is oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange mediated by hemoglobin? [closed]

Oxygen is transferred by hemoglobin from the lungs to tissues, while carbon dioxide is transferred by hemoglobin from tissues to lungs. How is this regulated bidirectional transfer mediated?
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117 views

Blood cells penetration

Is there a type of blood cell that can reach all other body cells? By "reach", I mean to "touch" the surface of the target cell. If we look at the red blood cell for example, that moves in blood ...
3
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1answer
382 views

How do CO₂ and carbonic acid (H₂CO₃) work in buffering the blood?

Been struggling with this for the past few days even after reading half of the acid base tutorial here, if someone could help me that'd be great. What I don't understand is how HCO3- is supposed to ...
5
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1answer
7k views

Besides hemoglobin, what proteins are present in red blood cells?

I knew that mature red blood cells (RBCs) lacked nuclei, but I wasn't aware until just now that they also lacked ribosomes and mitochondria. Most cells in the human body all contain a common laundry ...
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1answer
400 views

What is phenotyping of blood during transfusion process?

Thallaesemic patients are advised to have only "phenotypically matched blood".I mean the transfusion problems arise mainly due to "grouping problems" like mismatch b/w ABO & Rh+/- so what do this ...
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2answers
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Theranos blood test's Specificity and Accuracy?

I am studying the limitations of Theranos device. They have 238 documents in Google Patents Search (Inassignee as Theranos), here. Which patents are relevant for their device? They have 70 tests ...
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1answer
108 views

What are the features on a microscope one needs in order to do lab work?

By lab work I mean urinalysis, blood work(live as well), fecals, cytologies, histologies and all other. I have read(partly) a book(from 2002) on lab diagnostics and the author did not mention ...
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54 views

Could transfusion of a different blood type cure blood-based cancers?

Different antigen detection triggers an immune system response that could perhaps stimulate mitochondria and such in killing cancer cells - something like chemo without the hair-loss?
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2answers
23k views

Fate of erythrocytes after splenectomy

The spleen is considered a graveyard for red blood cells. So in case of Splenectomy (complete surgical removal of the spleen), what would be the fate of red blood cells? Would this cause Polycythemia?
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3answers
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What is this microscopic image from Peter Gabriel's New Blood album cover?

This image appears on the cover of Peter Gabriel's album New Blood. It appears to be a photograph of some microscopic biological cell. But it doesn't look like a blood cell to me. What kind of ...
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4answers
3k views

Antigen Antibody reactions during blood donation

A person wih blood group O is called a Universal Donor. Well, his plasma contains antibodies A and B. During blood donation, if blood group O is given to a person with blood group A (since blood group ...
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1answer
12k views

Why extract DNA from certain white blood cells instead of whole blood?

In my lab, human DNA is extracted from whole-blood samples. I don't actually do the extractions and I am not familiar with the specific protocol but I understand that platelets and red blood cells ...
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1answer
231 views

Can lymph be in peripheral blood?

I read an argument that 1-3% of lymph is in peripheral blood. However, I am not sure if this lymph is about lymphocytes in peripheral blood; not lymph itself. Lymph gets exchanged between capillaries ...
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2answers
583 views

Do females living on mountains have more RBCs than a normal male [closed]

I got this doubt when I was studying about haematocrit value. According to my NCERT textbook males have greater number of RBCs than females. But who will have more RBCs when comparing a normal male ...
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1answer
11k views

Carbon Monoxide and High-Oxygen-Affinity Varieties of Hemoglobin

I recently learned about the concept of "affinity" in regards to hemoglobin. For hemoglobin in humans, carbon dioxide has a lower affinity than oxygen, which allows gas exchange to occur in our lungs. ...
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1answer
3k views

Is it possible to condition the body to reduce bruising?

I do combat sports, and in these sports there are a lot of hits that can cause bruising. I've found that, over time, physical conditioning can reduce and/or eliminate the bruising to the point where ...
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0answers
129 views

Plateletpheresis for hemophilia

Plateletpheresis is seperation of platelets from whole blood and putting the leukocytes and erythrocytes back into the blood. If the person donating platelets does not have hemophilia than could a ...
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1answer
91 views

Protoporphyrinogen (IX) formation in heme synthesis

This picture shows one of the steps of heme synthesis. In this step two propanoate groups of coproporphyrinogen III are decarboxylated to form protoporphyrinogen IX. The enzyme that catalyses this ...
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1answer
9k views

Trauma, blood loss and thirst

Back story. Watched an episode of Arctic Air, (season three episode six), where they are practicing and hoping to become a licensed search and rescue airline. Anyhow; two hikers gets attacked by a ...
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1answer
280 views

Why do so many people have group O blood?

Please forgive me in case my question wouldn't make much sense. I was reading about ABO blood groups on Wikipedia, where I learnt that O is a recessive allele, and that it seems the A allele predates ...
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1answer
36 views

Detecting a Fasting State in the Body via Lasers

I was just wondering wether it would be possible to detect if the body is in a "fasting" state, via lasers attached to the body. If it is possible, what sort of laser would be needed?
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Does apheresis damage any components of blood? If not, why not?

Blood donation involving apheresis is becoming increasingly common. It looks like the process involves centrifuging blood at very high speeds* before removing the desired fraction and returning the ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the function of clot retraction?

I am thinking how clot retraction and fibrinolysis work together. I think that clot retraction is a process that gets clot towards fibrinolysis process. Fibrinolysis process then lyses the clot. ...
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1answer
49 views

Association of shorter telomeres with heart disease

From this paper Those with shorter telomeres in blood DNA had poorer survival, attributable in part to a 3.18-fold higher mortality rate from heart disease (95% CI 1(.)36-7.45, p=0.0079), and ...
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2answers
2k views

Rh factor and dominance of gene

"Formation of Rh antigen is controlled by dominant gene(R) and its absence by recipient gene(r).People having this antigen with genotype (RR or Rr) are called Rh positive and those whose blood is ...
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1answer
440 views

Prothrombin time when extrinsic pathway is turned off

I was searching for an answer that "why do we need intrinsic pathway when there is fast extrinsic pathway" and i found the answer in the following link: http://www.pathologystudent.com/?p=3197 It ...
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5answers
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Origin, or source, of rhesus negative in human blood

This is my first post here, so please be gentle. I recently learned that I have Rh- blood (I'm A-), and was idly looking into blood types on Wikipedia. I was surprised to find that relatively few (~15%...
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1answer
80 views

probability of having normal daughter

If father has hemophilia, mother is a carrier of the disease, then what is the probability of having a normal daughter ? My question: Should the probability of having a daughter be also multiplied ...
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0answers
112 views

Events after Endothelial interruption

What are the physiological events that occur after there is endothelial interruption in the blood vessel? What does endothelial interruption mean here? And what could be the physiological events?
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1answer
358 views

Blood group probability question

My answer ( after rounding off) is 9% -100( 0.75 X 0.25 X 0.5) but the answer given is 22 % Am I correct ?
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1answer
1k views

How do proteins get into the blood stream?

So I'm asking this in reference to the injection of insulin, which is commonly done subcutaneously (in the hypodermis, a fatty part of skin). Now I know proteins usually get into the blood when ...
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1answer
44 views

External tissues, connected to the body?

Some cancer tumors suppress themselves from spreading. When such tumors are removed by surgery, the metastasis process is accelerated. Isn't it possible to put such tumors into external device like ...
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2answers
7k views

What is the genetic basis of blood type (ABO) system?

What is the genetic basis of the A/B/B+/O/etc. blood type system? Are there definitive loci that correspond to each or can multiple different genotypes produce the same antigen profile? Also, is the ...
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1answer
1k views

Are tongues red because they contain blood?

Many animals have red tongues, though not all of them - blue-tongued skinks and giraffes come to mind. Are they red because of the blood (and therefore haemoglobin) in them? It sounds plausible, but ...