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Questions tagged [human-ear]

Questions regarding the structure, morphology, and function of the human ear.

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How far does eardrum move?

Sound waves move human eardrum back and forth, like the peak to peak excursion of speaker driver, how much is it though? Ofcourse this movement depends on sound pressure, frequency and even location ...
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1answer
25 views

How are sound waves amplified while traveling within the cochlea?

How are sound waves amplified while traveling from the basal membrane to apical membrane within the cochlea? Are they amplified by the movement of the stapes?
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1answer
58 views

Could one hear without his ear?

Might be a stupid question, but I'm quite curious about finding out ^^ If someone looses his ear, or for example cuts it of, just as Van Gogh did. Would he still be able to hear, since the actual ...
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55 views

Evolution - The ability to control ear muscles

Among animals the ability to control ear muscles is pretty common, but only a few humans have the ability. Is it because we in general lost this ability ?
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1answer
44 views

Pitch perception - why is the missing fundamental not directly detected in the cochlea?

I'm learning about pitch perception, and learned about the case of the missing fundamental. In the main image in that wikipedia page, it seems like the bottom graph, with the fundamental frequency ...
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1answer
154 views

What happens when I pop my ears?

What happens when my ears are popped? I understand it increases the air inside there which makes my volume louder, what happens after that, do my ears gradually readjust back to the air pressure that ...
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2answers
564 views

What is the difference between the otolith membrane and the endolymph?

The human vestibular system contains otoliths to sense acceleration in the vertical and horizontal plane. I cannot find what the difference is between the otolith membrane and the endolymph? Can ...
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1answer
67 views

How large are the inner ear hairs?

I was always under the impression that the auditory hairs located deep within the ear, past the ear drum, are microscopic. After taking a shower today, I was softly padding my outer ear with some ...
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1answer
81 views

How does the human ear guess the direction of the source? [duplicate]

Suppose a sound is produced behind you. You can easily tell that the sound came from behind. Our ear lobes face towards the front and hence traps the sound waves which come from the front. Yet, we ...
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60 views

Why don't my ears pop in the morning going through a tunnel?

I drive through a tunnel (morning and evening) on my normal work commute. In the evenings, my ears will pop going through this tunnel, but they do not pop in the mornings. There are actually 2 ...
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1answer
794 views

Ear ossicles a part of Skull?

Is there anything special about not considering ear ossicles as a part of skull? I could not understand the reasoning behind such classification.
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1answer
191 views

What is the course of inter auricular line?

BACKGROUND: The interauricular line is the line connecting two auricles. I wish to know the exact route through which this line passes. I want to be sure whether it passes through the parietal ...
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1answer
71 views

Cartilage regeneration

Why can we not regenerate cartilage in our ear and nose, while bones and flesh can heal? What makes it so resistant to regeneration. Can we artificially create it in the lab?
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357 views

Why does the inside of ear smell nice? [closed]

You can judge my habits later, but sometimes I stick my finger in my ear and smell my finger. When doing this, I get a pleasant smell for some reason. I haven't use hair lotion for a long time cause I ...
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2answers
234 views

In what range do humans generally interpret sound best?

I am currently working on a speech recognition frameworks. A generally used feature used in speech recognition are MFCC features, which uses the mel scale to extract features with. The mel scale ...
2
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1answer
581 views

How long do tiny spiders live? [closed]

I'm pretty sure there's a spider in my ear. I feel it move and hear the scratching (i blame my cat for playing with bugs in the bed). I've gone to the doctor, but all they do is flush my ear with ...
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1answer
391 views

How much does hearing deteriorate with age?

For the average person, what is the lowest volume of a pure tone at each frequency they can hear as a function of age? I know some people lose hearing faster than other people, because they are ...
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3answers
3k views

How we can localize sound vertically (up-down) and front-to-back?

It is quite simple to understand the concept of lateral localization of sound. It depends upon the loudness and time (and wave phase) difference between 2 ears. But how can we detect front-back ...
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0answers
32 views

Potential between endolymph/cytoplasm and endolymph/perilymph [closed]

I am studying for an exam and there is something I can't seem to understand. My textbook says that the endolymph contains 150mM potassium, 2mM Na+ and 130mM Cl-. The perilymph contains 5mM potassium, ...
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78 views

Pitch perception

I am a Physics student who also love music and learned a little bit about Medical Physics. I know that the Basilar membrane in the cochlear duct enables us to distinguish different frequencies. The ...
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1answer
643 views

Anatomy of the ear canal

When you insert your finger into your ear, you hit a dead end. You can't insert your finger into the auditory canal. What's this dead end called, the medical term for it?
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1answer
305 views

Short dated spontaneous ringing in ear [closed]

What causes very high pitched sound in one's ear?
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1answer
868 views

Why do we like music?

Music is, of course, just a sequence of sounds. Sounds are vibrations in the air, which our ears detect. So why do we find certain sequences of sounds to be appealing? What makes us want to hear these ...
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1answer
602 views

Why does the direction of endolymph flow oppose direction of body motion?

In the semicircular canals, the endolymph always flows in a direction that is opposite to the motion of the vestibular apparatus itself. I’m having trouble grasping why this is, and I would greatly ...
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2answers
4k views

Depolarization and hyperpolarization in stereocilia of the inner ear

It’s a well mentioned fact that when the stereocilia of the cochlear hair cells bend in one direction, the hair cell depolarizes, and when the stereocilia bend in the other direction, the cell ...
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1answer
2k views

What are the lower and upper hearing limits of the human ear?

I am looking for the loudness limits, expressed in decibels, for the human ear. Google and Wikipedia is only giving me the frequency limit that the human ear can receive, but I cannot find mention ...
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1answer
102 views

What is an auditory upward sweep?

I was reading an article in nature communications, when I came across this sentence: "The ‘match’ rule was indicated by either a blue circle or a auditory upward sweep".So I tried googling what was an ...
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3answers
28k views

Can humans perceive sounds above 20 kHz?

In the never-ending debate raging in the audiophile community about sound quality and what humans can or cannot hear, it is very very very very incredibly often cited that the upper-limit of the ...
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2answers
7k views

What is the human ear's temporal resolution?

What is the smallest sound duration that the human can hear? In other words, what is the lower duration limit for a sound to be translated into electrical signals by the ear? Suppose the human ear ...
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1answer
786 views

Why do humans hear better between 2kHz and 5kHz?

I've recently seen the following image: Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hoerflaeche.svg Translation (from German): The upper boundary (Schmerzgrenze) is where it starts to hurt "...
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3answers
642 views

Why do human ears have a lower boundary for the lowest energy perceivable signal than eyes?

I am currently hearing a lecture about human machine interaction. The lecturer is not a biologist (neither am I, we are both computer scientists), but he makes some statements about biology which I ...
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2answers
14k views

Does prolonged exposure to low pitch but low volume noise affect hearing or stress?

This is similar to another post but not quite the same... At work, our ventilation system produces a constant low pitched sound - like a rumble - as well as the sound of air blowing through the vents. ...
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0answers
80 views

TV's so loud when I turn over

Scenario: I'm about to fall asleep with the T.V. on. Having completely forgotten that it was, no longer even hearing it, just before falling asleep I turn over with a 'fresh' ear and it's blaring. If ...
9
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1answer
491 views

How can antibiotics damage the ear?

What is the mechanism by which aminoglycoside antibiotics (such as streptomycin and gentamicin) damage the mechano-sensory hair cells of the auditory and vestibular system? (Could this be seen as ...
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3answers
722 views

What exactly is Tinnitus?

What exactly is tinnitus? What is it's cause, and why do some people hear it and others don't?
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4answers
1k views

What is the evolutionary purpose of the topology of the human ear?

What is the evolutionary purpose of the topology of human ears? I understand why the ears may have a funnel-like shape but if the various "hills and valleys" do not amplify incoming sound, what ...
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1answer
139 views

How can one accurately diagnose the cause of human hearing loss without surgery?

In a human, if you were to avoid a tympanotomy (surgical examination of the middle ear), how could you distinguish between a blocked Eustachian tube, a ruptured eardrum, or a perilymph fistula? For ...
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1answer
871 views

While someone's ears pops with pressure, can he/she hear other sound at the same time?

I know that after or before someone's ears pops because of pressure changes, he/she can hear the sound such as laughter. But can these two things ("her ears popped with pressure" and "she can hear the ...
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1answer
37k views

How are the paranasal sinuses linked with the capillaries in the ear canals?

Sinus congestion often seems to be accompanied by excess pressure on the outer ears (as anyone who has shared a transcontinental flight with an infant can attest to) or fluid buildup in the canals. ...
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1answer
599 views

Are these claims of “revolutionising” understanding of human vision and hearing valid?

I've started a hobby machine vision project (and posted some questions to this end on other SE sites) and on a side track, also been looking at relevant research in human vision (and partly, hearing). ...
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1answer
415 views

Hearing and neurons- do ears have a sampling period?

From what I have read, outer hair cells in the human ear amplify incoming signals and inner hair cells "pick-up" the signals and generate action potential. However, neurons have refractory periods ...
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2answers
8k views

Why does yawning impair hearing?

When I yawn I can't hear anything happening around me. I also feel some kind of muscles inside my head contract and hear a faint hum, but it is not loud enough to explain not hearing other sounds. I ...
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3answers
6k views

Can a human smell through the ears?

The title does, prima facie, appear absurd. Performing a swallowing action whilst pinching the nostrils shut gives the impression of listening through a bucket filled with water around the head; ...
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716 views

What is ear wax?

A human, at some time in life or the other, must clear the auditory canal. This is usually achieved using soft-cotton buds, or such similar device. Where does this wax come from? What purpose does ...
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11k views

Will humans and animals be harmed by frequencies outside their hearing range?

The human ear (for example) is sensitive to frequencies from 20Hz to 20kHz. Any sound beyond that limit would not be heard by us naturally. Will it harm us (effect our ability to hear) when we hear ...