Questions tagged [immunology]

The study of the immune system in organisms, primarily responsible for fighting infection.

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Are tumor-associated antigens unique to cancerous cells?

Are tumor-associated antigens found only on the membrane of cancerous cells or just over-expressed on the membrane of carcinogenic cells? In other words, are these antigens also found on healthy ...
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What do we mean by MHC molecule diversity? Does each human have a variety of MHC molecule isoforms?

I'm going to try and explain what I think I know From what I understand, MHC/HLA molecules present peptides to T cells. To be able to present peptides from a wide variety of pathogens, they need to ...
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Difference between scFV vs scTCR

Both scFv and scTCR consist of 2 variable regions joined by a linker loop. The 2 variable regions both consist of 3 CDR regions encompassed by 4 framework regions. So what's the difference ...
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Body's response to second dengue attack

I have read in wikipedia that the first dengue virus infection is cleared by the body very easily. The second infection, however, is dangerous. How does body fight second infection, or does it has any ...
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Serological assays measuring antibody response

Given that an appropriate immune response to a bacteria may be thwarted in an individual, including not producing all of the antibodies which are known to occur in people who have been infected, or ...
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Can exposure to blood make pathogens resistant to the immune system?

If a drop of my blood is dropped into a pool of pathogens. Does that act as "reverse-vaccination" for said pathogens? I see this it as a potential risk for bacteria/viruses to compete or get ...
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What is the probability of an offspring sharing identical HLA typing as one of their parents?

DISCLAIMER: I have yet to thoroughly study HLA 100% to the bone, and hence I won't know everything about it at the back of the hand. Recently I came across this information on a San Francisco ...
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What is the relation between weak adhesion & rolling in immune cell migration vs. strong adhesion and emigration in immune cell migration?

Assume we're talking about lymphocyte migration. I think rolling is referring to part of the process of infection by chemotaxis but beyond that...
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Why do bulls-eye rashes look like they do?

People infected with Lyme Disease often present with an erythema migrans ("migrating redness") rash. Most often, these rashes are in the shape of a bulls-eye. Rash image. Presumably, this is a ...
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What is the purpose of getting a rabies vaccine after exposure?

After exposure to the virus, it is already inside you and your immune system will start to recognize it. Is the vaccine then just a way to kickstart this process so the body can fight off the ...
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Species specific White Blood Cells (WBC) composition

In our ongoing immunology undergrad course I learnt that neutrophil primarily fights off bacterial infection and lymphocyte is produced in response to viral infection. I also learnt that neutrophil ...
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What's the difference between veterinary and human snake antivenom?

Recently, out of curiosity, I looked online if snake antivenom for humans were actually sold for individuals. I found out they aren't. Not only that, but bills can get really high on countries that ...
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Why are red blood cells not attacked by NK cells?

All cells containing a nucleus present MHC-I, while some specialized cells present MHC-II in addition to that. Since erythrocytes lack any MHC why do natural killer cells not attack them? It is my ...
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Presence of anti-drug-antibodies in patients prior to drug exposure (Mabs)?

How do we explain the presence of anti-drug-antibodies in patients prior to exposure to a drug - specifically for monoclonal antibodies (Mabs)?
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Meaning of units in ELISA based tests?

For some ELISA based antibody tests (e.g. h-tTg antibody test), labs report units as RU/mL or U/mL. Also different labs have different cut off (normal range) values. I understand that different kit ...
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Why don't we build up an immunity to sore throat?

We often get sore throats once or twice a year, and it clears in a few days sometimes without any antibiotics. I was wondering why doesn't our body become immune after clearing a sore throat?
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How are humanized antibodies made?

What kind of antigen is used to provoke/induce an immune response if you are trying to make therapeutic humanized antibodies for cancer and alzheimer's disease? For example, if you wanted to make an ...
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Is there any evidence that immunity or resistance is heritable?

Is any means by which smallpox or any other disease be heritable? I have heard that smallpox introduced by European colonialists affected (and reduced) a significant proportion of the native ...
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Heritable immunity and smallpox vaccination [duplicate]

As I understand it, lack of heritable immunity caused smallpox to wipe out certain communities of native Americans. If vaccination conveys heritable immunity to a population, shouldn’t this make ...
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Is there evidence that children should play in dirt to get healthy?

I've heard it said many times, that we should let children play in the dirt as it builds up their immunity and prevents things like allergies in later life. I have another suggestion which, to me, is ...
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How are monocytes larger than capillaries?

I have read that the average size of a capillary is about 8 micrometers. How is it possible that the 15 micrometer or so monocytes in blood do not block these vessels? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/...
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Immune response to IgA positive bacteria

If certain bacteria can be coated with IgA in vitro, does that mean they are likely to elicit an IgA immune response? Edit I'm working on a project that involves IgA-Seq analysis. Bacteria are coated ...
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1answer
140 views

Can the psychology of a person alter his immune system and health?

Can the psychology of a moderate aged person alter his immune health? because I have read many a times about the different types of linkages between nervous system and immune system. Can someone ...
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Purpose of Fc Region

Could someone explain to me the role played by the Fc region of an antibody as well as the purpose of isotype switching? According to Wikipedia, it's to allow the antibody to be usable by different Fc ...
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Why did T cells have evolved to recognise self cells along with foreign antigent to generate a response?

T cells have evolved to be strain specific. For a T cell to respond it has to identify not only the foreign antigen but the antigen must also be attached to a self cell. what is the significance of ...
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Why proximal muscle weakness is seen earlier than distal muscle weakness in Dermatomyositis?

It is said that in dermatomyositis(DM) , proximal muscle weakness is seen earlier than distal muscle weakness. It is also said that , DM is due to damage to small blood vessels contributing to muscle ...
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Why do some people have symptoms of salmonella and others not?

So I was reading from the Mayo Clinic website and they say that typically people with Salmonella have no symptoms, but why? Why do some people have symptoms and others not? Salmonella does after all ...
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Immune System - B-cell receptors

How do the B-cells, which are a part of our body, develop antibodies against antigens of the outside world (outside of our body), which they don't even know about? Is it just a random match?
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Why it is rare for person to get infected with two Pathogens?

Why is it rare for a person to have 2 (or more) infectious diseases (for example: Flu & Cold together at the same time)? Although it's rare, it happens when the immune system is weak (e.g when ...
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Why do NK cells not destroy bacteria, even though bacteria don't have MHC-I?

Part of the function of NK cells is to destroy cells that are unable to bind their KIR receptors. Or in other words, cells that don't express MHC class I. This is why they can kill MHC supressed ...
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Could bone marrow transplants be used to prevent tissue rejection of trans-species organs?

So the immune system doesn't calibrate (for want of a better euphemism) to recognize it's own cells until fairly well along in fetal development & the major components of the immune system (...
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Antibodies combine with antigens in the presence or abscence of macrophages?

There was a mcq in book that antibodies combine with antigens when.... And the correct answer was if macrophages are absent. As far as I know macrophages release interleukin 1 which stimulates T ...
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How to find suitable qRTPCR reference gene for a inflammatory response experiment?

I have tried several housekeeping genes – Hprt, β-actin and GAPDH, to analyze the relative expression of a cytokine for measuring the inflammatory local response in mice ears. However, all ...
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Is it possible to train allergic resistance by exposing yourself to allergens?

My hypothesis is that one can decrease the allergic reactions over time by continuously exposing yourself to slowly increasing doses of allergens. Is there any scientific evidence pointing this right ...
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Can MHC class I be used for presenting peptides of extracellular origin by non-professional APCs?

Wikipedia says that: "The antigens presented by MHC class II are derived from extracellular proteins (not cytosolic as in MHC class I)." So does this mean that MHC class I cannot be used for ...
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What is the meaning of expansion of T cells?

In immunology, what does it mean by the term 'expansion' of T cells ex-vivo and activate it (generally with reference to cancer immunotherapy)?
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Oral Administration of Immunizations

Small children and people in developing countries may take oral dosage forms of vaccines. Antigens passing through the GI tract will come into contact with Peyer's patches and be absorbed by microfold ...
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What is the smallest molecule that can present as an antigen to the immune system in the context of allergies?

People often claim, in a colloquial sense, that they are "allergic to everything". Is it possible to have a full-fledged IgE mediated allergic response to very small molecules? I was always under ...
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What is meant by 'fixing' of an antigen presenting cell?

Can someone please explain what does 'fixing' of an antigen presenting cell mean?
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Placebo Effect Reactions

Why do some people actually experience measureable effects when given a placebo(fake drugs) versus the actual drug? Is is the power of suggestion, belief, or something else?
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Can people with AIDS get tattoos?

When I do a Google search, most of the results are about whether or not people can get HIV / AIDS from getting a tattoo through dirt needles. I am, however, curious whether or not it is possible to ...
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Why do we have such a wide range of responses to pathogens and carcinogens?

I was reading an article recently debunking the idea of 'boosting' your immune system. It occurred to me that - presuming it's right - our immune systems are all pretty much the same (with the ...
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Why don't allergies cause fever?

Allergy To my understanding, an allergy is a hypersensitivity of the immune system causing a substance in the environment to be identified as pathogenic by the immune system while it is not ...
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How does the immune system recognize harmful proteins?

How does the human immune system detect whether a protein happens to be a protein found in the body that is supposed to be there, a bacterial toxin that should be inactivated, an already inactivated ...
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What properties of the pathogens of infectious diseases make recovered individuals susceptible to the disease?

I was wondering what properties of the pathogens of infectious diseases make these diseases more prone to making recovered individuals immediately susceptible to the disease? I was thinking that with ...
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What will happen if a foetus is Rh- and the mother is Rh+?

If a mother has Rh-negative blood and her foetus has Rh-positive blood it will result in rhesus incompatibility and lead to erythroblastosis fetalis. What will happen if the reverse occurs, when a ...
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What are the effects of removing CD4 receptors?

If the gene for the CD4 receptor was removed, would the person's immune system work normally? Could a new artificial receptor be substituted in place of CD4? Could HIV infection be prevented in this ...
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Where are Opsonins produced?

I read that opsonins are a type of antibody that play a vital role in chemotaxis and phagocytosis in general. The fact of them being antibodies though, got me confused. Antibodies are, to my knowledge ...
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Are microbial antigens selected against?

Antigens provoke a response from the host immune system. Could selective pressures result in microbes losing their antigens? Has this been observed? Or are antigens typically so important that they ...
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How are primary monoclonal antibodies for screening mutant cells made, physically?

I'm working with a fairly common protein expressed in a large numbers of organisms, let's say a keratin-associated beta-protein. I'm trying to develop a process which requires primary-secondary ...