Questions tagged [infectious-diseases]

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6
votes
2answers
143 views

Can an infectious diseases come from a plant?

Coronavirus, HIV, 1918 Flu, etc. They all come from animals. Do any infectious diseases (in humans) come from plants? More specifically, are there viruses that infect plants that can mutate to infect ...
24
votes
1answer
3k views

Loss of taste and smell during a SARS-CoV-2 infection

In France the loss of taste and smell (la perte du goût et de l'odorat) is considered as one of the key symptoms of a SARS-CoV-2 infection (although googling shows that it is considered less ...
8
votes
2answers
434 views

Does avoiding medication that alleviates symptoms shorten the length of a cold?

People use over the counter (OTC) medications to relieve symptoms of the common cold. However, these symptoms are part of the immune response, right? They are driven by the body responding to the ...
3
votes
1answer
114 views

How can an infection of lower respiratory tract lead to a skin infection? [closed]

I am interested in the multifactorial process about infectious diseases of the lower respiratory system and their progression to a skin infection. Possible agens are zwitterions, viruses, fungi, ...
2
votes
1answer
244 views

We know that the hepatitis C virus can live on surfaces for at least six weeks. Maybe longer. The infectivity study ended after just six weeks; why?

Background A paper has found that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) can remain infective for at least six weeks on ordinary household surfaces. You can see the free full text, or a summary for busy ...
0
votes
2answers
103 views

Why does the SARS-CoV2 virus not remain infectious forever? Or does it?

Given that the majority of biologists do not currently consider viruses to be alive, a virus can never die. It can, however, get destroyed by long exposures to soapy water, alcohol, and apparently ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Why are diseases generally specific to a particular species

"Zoonosis" is the process of transmitting a disease from an infected animal to a human. This suggests that animal-to-human transmission is not common. HIV is believed to have first spread to humans ...
8
votes
2answers
452 views

Why do OX5034 GM mosquitos require the presence of tetracycline to survive? What does the drug do in this case?

I'm confused. Debug Fresno; why are the released mosquitos said to be sterile? from 2017 addresses male mosquitos released with a bacteria that will affect fertility of females after mating. They are ...
3
votes
1answer
112 views

Debug Fresno; why are the released mosquitos said to be sterile?

I saw in the news that Verily Life Sciences will participate in an experimental release of sterile male aedes aegypti mosquitos in Fresno, California. Aedes aegypti is considered an invasive species ...
2
votes
0answers
71 views

Is a nightly curfew an effective intervention strategy for limiting the spread of an infectious disease? [closed]

The governing bodies of several geographic areas hit by disease outbreaks will sometimes impose a nightly curfew on their citizens, restricting or limiting the ability of their citizens from going ...
2
votes
1answer
583 views

How does Vibrio cholerae benefit from infecting its host?

As far as I know, V. cholerae secretes a toxin called choleragen into the intestinal lumen which affects the intestinal epithelial cells causing release of Na+ and Cl- ions into the lumen and reducing ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Are specific primers or detectors, or both, used in COVID-19 tests?

I am trying to learn about the rRT-PCR testing procedure used to test for COVID-19, but I am slightly confused on one point. Are highly specific primers used with a non-specific detector, or are ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

A study found that the hepatitis C virus can live on surfaces for six weeks. Did they end the study before the seventh week began?

A study once found that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) can remain infective for six weeks on ordinary household surfaces. You can see the free full text, or a summary for busy clinicians. What happened ...