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Questions tagged [inflammation]

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Loss of function in inflammation

The Wikipedia-article about Inflammation says The five classical signs of inflammation are heat, pain, redness, swelling, and loss of function (Latin calor, dolor, rubor, tumor, and functio laesa). ...
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What is the difference between cytokine and chemokine?

I often see these terms being used in inflammation, and I'd like to know, are they synonymous with each other or do they mean different things? Also could someone provide an example of each?
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Do muscles and connective tissue have different types of pain receptors?

I assume that muscles have pain receptors ("nociceptors"?) that fire when the muscle is under excessive strain or even tears or becomes injured. I also assume that similar pain receptors exist for ...
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Why doesn't surgical steel cause inflammation?

It seems some very specific alloys like implant surgical steel and titanium don't cause inflammation in the human body, but when I asked my doctor about it, they simply said "it just has some chemical ...
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1answer
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Are new blood vessels able to deliver oxygen to hypoxic tissue before the establishment of blood circulation?

Sprouting angiogenesis - the growth of new blood vessels from a preexisting vasculature - can be triggered by cells in hypoxia in order to re-stablish the oxygen and nutrients supply to the tissue. ...
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1answer
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How did the “serendipitous rediscovery” of Sulfasalazine as an antirheumatic agent after 30 years happen?

This excellent answer describes the history of the ~50 year old drug Sulfasalazine, and it's worthwhile to take a moment and read through the answer now. Roughly speaking the drug is an antibiotic ...
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1answer
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How did Sulfasalazine become a disease-modifying treatment for rheumatoid arthritis?

Sulfasalazine has been around for about fifty years, starting as an antibiotic. More recently it is used as a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD, see also arthritis.org). While biologics (...
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1answer
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Why hasn't there been a serious effort to develop an anti-inflammatory that blocks the responsible genes? [closed]

After numerous years of reading about how to disable inflammation and related treatments, it appears that the common existing approaches are fundamentally wrong. The most popular over-the-counter ...
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0answers
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In the event of an abrasion, do mast cells cause vasodilation or vascular constriction?

Or both? I am unsure as to what mast cells will do in the event of a wound either on the epidermis or the epithelial. I know they secrete factors that mediate vascular constriction / dilation, but I ...
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2answers
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From what stage can you speak of an inflammation?

Imagine you hit your foot at a table leg and it hurts a while or you got a tiny graze. Those injuries aren't an infection but could these things still be called an inflammation? Is it necessary that ...
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0answers
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Can oral bacteria be targeted by white blood cells?

Today I was told from a dentist that a leukocyte is much larger than a bad bacterium. So a leukocyte cannot remove bad bacteria when they hide in very places like the space between the gums and teeth ...
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1answer
77 views

How many NOD like receptors in Human?

This is pretty specific question maybe. Anybody have an estimate? For Toll Like Receptors there are something like 10... http://www.jbc.org/content/276/4/2551.long I'm only finding NOD1 and NOD2 => ...
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1answer
113 views

How does a blunt force stimulate histamine to develop early stages of inflammation?

I know that viruses and sharp forces can stimulate mast cells by cut or by a virus infecting them and then release histamine. How can blunt force do this and cause inflammation? It doesn't have the ...
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1answer
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Can inhibition of lymphocytes migration be a direct cause of chronic inflammation?

Here is the original slide: I am thinking about the "cord factor" sentence in a more general case. Assume you inhibit Leucocytes migration. How does this lead to accumulation of macrophages in the ...
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1answer
119 views

Which inflammatory response with Cytomegalovirus infection?

I am thinking about inflammation process with Cytomegalovirus infection. I first thought it is about chronic inflammation, but then changed my mind because of virus infection. I think cytokines must ...
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1answer
133 views

How host defends against S. pneumoniae capsule?

The host response involves at least phagocytosis and probably localised acute inflammatory response at least after the colonisation. I am thinking how the host can defend against pneumolysin which ...
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1answer
255 views

What are the purposes of granulocytes in acute inflammation?

I heard the phrase Neutrophilic leucocytes are kings in the acute inflammation. Neutrophils are granulocytes, while leucocytes are not granulocytes. I think this statement refers to the fact that ...
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1answer
32 views

How many systemic reactions in inflammation?

I have this sentence in my notes Inflammation consists of two local reactions and one systemic reactions. which is difficult for me to accept. Two local reactions are vascular and cellular. I ...
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1answer
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Is Rheumatic fever more Chronic than acute?

It follows from the complication of S.pyogenes' pharyngitis. I am thinking how the inflammatory response behaves: acute or chronic or something between. I think chronic disease is better description ...