Questions tagged [light]

Electromagnetic radiation, specifically the range of wavelengths visible to humans ("visible light").

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33 views

Why isolated chlorophyl emits red light?

If we observe isolated chlorophyl solution with UV light, chlorophyl is seen as red. explanation suggests that when specific atom of chlorophyl absorbs UV light, atom gets excited and in a short time ...
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76 views

Fluorescent purple flowers?

Do some flowers fluoresce? Some deep purple Lobelias and larkspurs seem to glow and confuse my eyes in sunlight. It reminds me of those blue LED Christmas lights (they come in strings with other ...
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Would green light look different if blue and red cones were deactivated

When looking at a graph plotting "blue", "green" and "red" cones reponses to different wavelengths, you can see that any wavelength trigerring a response from green cones ...
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Can insects be killed by intense visible light?

Some mosquitoes and flies were sitting on the white ceiling. I took a very powerful flashlight to try and daze and then vacuum them. When I put the flashlight's head against the ceiling (with a ...
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Are two colors (red + blue) necessary for LED grow lights, or would either color be sufficient?

Below are some chlorophyll absorption spectra from other answers here. There is strong absorption at both the blue/violet end, and the red end of the spectrum, and presumably both of these contribute ...
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Why when measuring turbidity do we use the minimum wavelength?

As a preface, I read a few other related posts and was able to gather some knowledge, though without any background in physics I am having some trouble here piecing together a coherent view. I looked ...
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Most optically transparent muscle phantom?

I am trying to use Schlieren imaging techniques to visualize how a sound wave propagates through muscle tissue. In the past, when needing to experiment with muscle we would use an agar based muscle ...
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Why doesn't the rate of photosynthesis increase with increasing light energy (frequency)? [duplicate]

Why doesn't the rate of photosynthesis increase with increasing light energy (frequency)? I know that green light is not absorbed by chlorophyll, yet I am confused as to why this certain "...
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189 views

What are the physiological effects of retinal exposure to 380–400nm light?

There are two categories of sunglasses: UV380 sunglasses block all light with wavelength 380nm or lower, while UV400 sunglasses block all light with wavelength 400nm or lower. This made me wonder, ...
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Do SILK fibres let light pass through it?

The reason given by Wikipedia for silk fibres being lustrous is that: Silk fibres have triangular prism-like structure, which allows them to refract the incoming light at different angles. By my ...
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Why is human vision restricted to 400-700 nm?

Across the electromagnetic spectrum, 400-700 nm is a narrow spectrum of frequencies and focused in the region of short wavelengths. For example, radio waves cover a large range of frequencies ...
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491 views

Why is 450 nm monochromatic light perceived as blue or violet depending on its intensity?

Trying to do some color matching I purchased a 450 nm laser. I expected monochromatic light of this laser to have similar properties to those of all others I've already played with — 808, 640, 520, ...
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470 views

Can human perception differentiate between monochromatic and polychromatic light?

Maybe monochromatic is not the right word, what I mean is light consisting of a single wavelength (i.e. a spectral color) versus light composed of photons of multiple wavelengths (intermediate color). ...
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Is evolution the reason why water is colourless for our eyes?

Liquid water is transparent to most of the visible spectra, whereas it absorbs infrared. Similarly, the air is almost transparent to the visible spectra too. Could these be the reasons why our eyes ...
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1answer
146 views

Are mosquitoes attracted to blue lights in particular?

I've been confronting the fact since childhood that mosquitoes are attracted to lights, especially blue lights. Now I know that all insects including mosquitoes are attracted to bright light but I ...
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Are there any studies on the solar latitude limits of different plant species, beyond which they wouldn't thrive even with suitable weather?

Not sure whether this belongs here or in the Gardening & Landscaping StackExchange, but here goes... According to maps provided in the paper Present and future Köppen-Geiger climate ...
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1answer
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A poor man's COVID-19 vaccine? [closed]

If person A is infected (COVID-19) and person B is not, could the following work as a vaccination? Person A exhales (coughs?) into a a transparent bag. The bag is radiated for a long time with a ...
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What kinds of light attract moths best?

On average, do we know what kind of lights attract moths best? LED, filament bulb, candle...? And what about colour? Does that matter?
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What is the simplest way to demonstrate the germicidal property of UV light?

This is intended for a high school project. I am familiar with the one that studies growth of e coli over time in a petri dish but I a bit concerned about as to how safe a demonstration of this nature ...
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Blue light in a fridge. Is it really beneficial or just marketing?

Recently while visiting a shop with electronics I saw a fridge with a huge advertisment sticker going more or less like this: There's blue light source in this fridge so there will be less bacteria ...
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1answer
91 views

Effect of light intensity on the frequency of stomata

According to this article, the frequency of stomata increases with an increase in the intensity of light. What I inferred from this is, since the rate of photosynthesis increases at higher light ...
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886 views

Can the retina emit light?

The retina is light sensor, which converts light to an electrical signal. LEDs can both emit and receive light. Similarly, is it possible to apply electricity to retina to generate light? Simply put,...
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Can UV radiation be safe for the skin?

It is well known that UV radiation can damage the DNA and generally harm our skin. We also know that UV radiation helps on the production of melanin and Vitamin D. From what I could find, the DNA ...
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Why does vision gradually becomes dimmer in bright setting?

I don't know if this is only happens to me, but if I am in a well lit room and I stare at one point or just look at one area without moving my eyes around my vision in that specific light setting ...
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1answer
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Killing microorganisms on agar plates?

If I grow microorganisms on agar plates and I expose them to UV light. How exactly will I know that the microorganisms have been killed? I was watching a video that showed spots in the petri dish ...
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Why do human eyes glow red on a photo and dog's eyes green?

Previous Research I know that cameras sometimes come with an anti "red eye" functionality that involves two flashes, presumably the second flash coincides with the shutter opening. Question Why do ...
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1answer
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Why does a lightsource postpone the time it takes for the leaves falling from a birch tree?

It is autumn and the leaves have already left their trees on all birch and other trees that has leaves, except one. This birch has a spotlight pointed to the tree and it is on 24/7. I have recognized ...
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157 views

Do flies avoid infrared light?

If flies avoid IR light, many places can be kept free from flies using IR light. We see insect repellers in many restaurants, but they don't seem to work well. Can IR be a safe & effective ...
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What does "chlorophyll photosynthesis peak" mean in relation to photon wavelength?

When reading about how green / leafy plants work, I saw that they have chlorophyll A & B, which allow the plant to use the energy from light by capturing and transforming. When reading about ...
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Does cataract condition cause red film when sun is shining?

Since two years ago I have a red film in my field of vision when the sunlight (or a white spot) is at the border (or even lightly behind) of the vision field, the red color is especially obvious at ...
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262 views

Question to the color scientists

I have a question. if you look at these two spectral diagrams (SPDs) from two different televisions that is calibrated to the same white point (D65) 6500K with a spectrometer. The problem is that ...
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Can low melatonin levels and/or LED lights cause or exacerbate macular degeneration?

I have two questions that may or may not be interconnected. My first question is: Does melatonin prevent macular degeneration? Could low melatonin levels (caused by blue-rich light exposure in the ...
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What happens when pure chlorophyll A absorbs blue light?

When pure chlorophyll A is put in the presence of only blue light, what happens? My guess is that the extra energy is released as heat/kinetic energy, and then the electron has dropped to the lowest ...
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What causes a selective shift of colour perception after removing wavelength filtered glasses?

Background To improve sleep by reducing blue-light melatonin disruption, I wear night-glasses that filter short wavelengths (e.g. something like these). With these glasses on, both the top and bottom ...
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Why did we evolve to be able to see this specific set of wavelengths only? [duplicate]

It is understandable that life didn't evolve the capability to sense all wavelengths of light, it simply didn't need it. My question is, why did it evolve the set of wavelengths it has, for example, ...
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Does night mode on iPhone really help?

Okay so I know that night mode is supposed to filter out blue light that is bad for the eyes, but is it really more helpful than annoying? At night I do use it when I’m on the phone but it doesn’t ...
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What is the difference between GFP and rhodopsin?

GFP and Rhodopsin are both fluorescent proteins. What is the main difference between GFP and Rhodopsin in terms of how they work? I know that their excitation and emission wavelengths are different, ...
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Why do I still see a bright light after looking directly at it?

When you look directly at a bright light, maybe accidentally when looking at the sun, the shape of the image may persistently be perceived even after you look away. Does this image persistence have ...
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1answer
385 views

What photoreceptors are necessary to permit infrared vision?

Humans have red green and blue photoreceptors allowing them to sense colours in the spectrum of about 400-700nm. Certain proteins allow for the extending of wavelength range in the RGB receptors, this ...
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Do Vaccinium membranaceum plants need a minimum amount of darkness per 24 hours?

I have Vaccinium membranaceum (black huckleberry) seedlings growing in a greenhouse. I have the option of providing fluorescent light to the plants 24 hours a day. However, it has occurred to me that ...
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Can light destroy auxin?

In my biology textbook, it says that plants grow towards light because auxin is laterally transferred from the light side to the shaded side, so more auxin stimulates growth and hence the plant bends ...
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What amount of light energy is required to produce one O2 molecule? How about one molecule of NADPH?

I know that for each O2 molecule, a total of 8 photons are required (4 per photosystem). Would the amount of light energy required be E=hc/wavelength using 680 and 700? Or would the energy from the ...
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Are natural daylight lamps for Seasonal Affective Disorder just about the color temperature?

I've seen many expensive lamps made for people who have Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and/or who live in regions where there isn't much daylight during the winter. I'm wondering if the benefit of ...
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Why do most plants reflect green and others other colors?

I have read that chlorophyll absorbs red and blue. As shown in detail in the absorption spectra, chlorophyll absorbs light in the red (long wavelength) and the blue (short wavelength) regions of ...
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Reaction centre in Photosystems of higher plants

In photosystems of higher plants, there are about 250-400 pigments (number wise) in a particular photosystem. Out of which,approx 170-180 pigments are of chlorophyll a molecules. And any one of them ...
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Mobile carriers of Light reaction in higher plants

The hydrogen carrier PQ and the electron carrier PC are the mobile carriers in light reaction facilitating electron transfer from PS II to PS I during non-cyclic process. My question is - How do ...
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Is it safe to look at infrared LEDs?

What happens if one looks directly at infrared LEDs? Sometimes I see this kind of LED at night as red dots and I'm also courious about it. I was wondering what would happen if one looks directly to ...
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Does iris color effect the amount of light that reaches photosensitive ganglion cells?

Does eye color (of iris) have any effect on the amount of light reaching retina cells and hence effect melatonin production?
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Does Rüppell's Griffon Vulture Have Greatest Vision Acuity? (Small Carrion Spotted at 10 km+?)

Synopsis: Some sources seem to imply the Rüppell's (griffon) vulture (Gyps rueppelli) can see objects at a distance in excess of 10 km -- roughly three times the ...
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Myopia & the Blur Effect

I know myopia is caused by elongation of the eyeball. When the eye is too long, light entering the eye balls falls in front of the retina instead of on it. However I do not quite understand how this ...