Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

Questions tagged [medicine]

Medicine is the doctrine of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injuries in humans and animals. Health and medicine questions are off-topic unless dealing with the biology underlying health and medicine. Please carefully explore the tour, help centre, and meta before posting health and medicine questions.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
1answer
59 views

How do painkillers prevent shock?

I was reading about the Placebo effect and came across this little story: The roots of the placebo problem can be traced to a lie told by an Army nurse during World War II as Allied forces ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

On preventive medicine

Given that it is very difficult to pre-diagnose or predict happening of certain disease how is preventive medicine and curing disease before they happen possible?
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What are the coverings of femoral hernia?

It was my Viva question and I was really puzzled.I know what is femoral hernia and it route like the abdominal content moves down the femoral canal and further through the saphenous opening and all ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Why proximal muscle weakness is seen earlier than distal muscle weakness in Dermatomyositis?

It is said that in dermatomyositis(DM) , proximal muscle weakness is seen earlier than distal muscle weakness. It is also said that , DM is due to damage to small blood vessels contributing to muscle ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

What is a catalytic domain?

I have to answer a few questions from an article I'm reading, and I am just really confused on defining "catalytic domain." I have to relate it to the antibiotic Teixobactin. Is catalytic domain the ...
9
votes
2answers
245 views

What was the biological mechanism that allowed Tarrare to eat so much?

Are there any conjectured mechanisms that cause Tarrare's extremely oversized stomach and abdominal cavity? Along with his superhuman appetite of course. Whether from a medical perspective or a ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

What does “radiographic progression” mean in cancer?

I tried looking up the definition of the term "radiographic progression" using Google and medical dictionary, etc., but I couldn't find its meaning anywhere. All research articles that I found just ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

How is Pseudomonas aeruginosa diagnosed?

I know that P. aeruginosa is cultured on an agar plate, but which media or assays make it distinct from other Gram-negative bacteria?
1
vote
1answer
17 views

Does Cholestyramine (CSM) raise Tyramine levels?

This is a layman's question. Will ingesting Cholestyramine (CSM, the resin, in powdered form to be specific) raise tyramine levels? I am asking because Cholestyramine clearly has "tyramine" in its ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

How does drinking 25 mg-50mg Viagra every night cure Erectile Disfunction permanently? [closed]

https://www.webmd.com/erectile-dysfunction/news/20040513/nightly-viagra-may-restore-normal-erections#2 This article says that people taking viagra once daily can have erection restored permanently ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

Difference between “controlled release” vs “prolonged release”

My sister is using the epilepsy drug Tegretol which has both CR and retard (previous naming for prolonged release according to https://www.medicines.org.uk/emc/product/5932/smpc) versions in different ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Finding out the best concentration for my plant extract to be used as drug for diabetes

I am using plant extract of Ajuga parviflora and found out that it possess anti-diabetic properties by using alpha-amylase inhibitory assay. I used various concentration 250 µg/ml(29% inhibiton of ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

What's the difference between veterinary and human snake antivenom?

Recently, out of curiosity, I looked online if snake antivenom for humans were actually sold for individuals. I found out they aren't. Not only that, but bills can get really high on countries that ...
5
votes
1answer
151 views

Are there diseases for which a placebo treatment is state of the art?

I was reading about the placebo effect, and I wondered if there exists or ever existed a disease with the following properties: There are no known treatments for the disease that perform better than ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

For how long can the heart be in asystole and then restart itself?

The medication Adenosine is used for the treatment of some abnormal heart rhythms. However, according to Wikipedia, it can cause asystole for a few seconds: Because of the effects of adenosine on ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

If we can make magic bullets that are basically artificial antibodies, why has a cure for cancer not yet been developed? [closed]

So protonsil and salvarsan 606 where both used as the first magic bullets in the modern period of medicine in the 1900s. However, if we can create artificial antibodies that target specific diseases ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Narcan nasal spray

A recent podcast of Radiolab (time index 3:05) described a person who had overdosed given the nasal spray form of Narcan. The report indicated the patient was awake seconds after the spray was ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Why do NK cells not destroy bacteria, even though bacteria don't have MHC-I?

Part of the function of NK cells is to destroy cells that are unable to bind their KIR receptors. Or in other words, cells that don't express MHC class I. This is why they can kill MHC supressed ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

How would a medication cause a one to maintain a different weight?

This isn’t really a medical question, I’m just really curious about this. I was maintaining weight A and then started taking a medication that brought me to weight B. While on the medication, I ...
3
votes
2answers
65 views

Can endometriosis be considered a form of cancer?

In endometriosis the lesions form their own vasculature and compromise organs, arteries, and nerves. It can spread and embed throughout the body. It's difficult to treat as the adhesions resulting ...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

What is meant by Remote Diuretics & Remote Vomiting?

I have encountered the terms Remote Diuretics & Remote Vomiting separately or sometimes in association in various articles related to medicine. But I am unable to find any reference to what they ...
3
votes
4answers
823 views

Why does an increased heart rate mean increased blood pressure?

Say a person starts exercising. If their cardiac volume remains the same but their heart rate increases so that the overall result is an increase in cardiac output, will their blood pressure increase ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Techniques of molecular medicine/biology for aesthetic medicine?

Are there scientifically valid methods (possibly in the developmental stage) that can be used for aesthetic medicine. Usually surgical of physical therapies are used for aesthetic medicine, but ...
0
votes
1answer
291 views

What is a Archival Tumor Tissue ? For What Purpose is it collected?

Over the course of Conducting trials various tissue and tumor samples are collected from the patients. One such sample is the Archival Tumor Tissue. Could someone kindly clarify what is the meaning ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Pulse Oximetry, what significance does a decimal place hold?

I work in a sleep research lab. We have a couple of Masimo pulse oximeters that report pulse oximetry values in terms of integers (e.g. 90, 91, 92, etc.). Now our principle investigators used to use ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

Why can't diamine oxidase be supplemented?

I've read from an academic article that diamine oxidase cannot be supplemented but it had no explanation as for why. I am curious as to why this? Food rich in histamine or red wine may cause ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Do antimuscarinic drugs increase cAMP or cGMP

Activation of muscarinic receptors M2 and M4 inhibits adenylate cyclase which reduces cAMP levels. It would be expected that antimuscarinics such as ipratropium would increase cAMP levels. However, ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Which aspects of evolutionary biology are most relevant to medical practice? [closed]

I'm not pretty much sure if this question suites this forum. But I think its important. In what aspects evolutionary biology can be seen to be very helpful in medical curricula? Clearly infection ...
7
votes
3answers
102 views

Global database for patients with rare and important injuries or disease?

I was recently reading Christof Koch's The Quest for Consciousness, and several times he mentioned how important some patients with sad and terrible brain injuries were for the understanding of the ...
7
votes
1answer
491 views

Why can't we find a broad spectrum antiviral drug to viruses like antibiotics to bacteria?

Antibiotics have a very broad spectrum because they attack the metabolism pathways many bacteria share. For example, penicillin inhibits peptidoglycan synthesis, which is vital for formation of cell ...
6
votes
1answer
14k views

What is a lip? (upper lip and lower lip)

Everyone knows what a lip is but I'm asking from a technical and anatomical standpoint. Actually what we call "lip" is "vermilion" in medical terminology. But I want to ask if my understanding is ...
9
votes
1answer
3k views

How does the immune system fight scabies mites?

After a distressing episode involving my elderly mother and a nursing home, I've been reading up on scabies. It seems that in healthy people, the immune system limits the mite population to around 10 ...
5
votes
2answers
186 views

Could this Francobelgian comic book woman really have these 4 diseases at the same time?

I'm doing an archive binge of a paper comic "The Kiekeboes". One of the characters is an elderly woman currently at the doctor, and she says the has the following illnesses: Erythema Exsudativum ...
3
votes
1answer
729 views

How does hyperthyroidism cause diarrhea?

According to Robbin's Pathology, hyperthyroidism leads to an overactivity of the sympathetic system. It also goes on to mention that this sympathetic hyperstimulation in the gut leads to increased ...
0
votes
1answer
200 views

Can upper motor neuron lesions cause hypotonia?

I have been taught that hypotonia is always caused by lower motor neuron lesions while hypertonia is by upper motor neuron lesions. However, I recently learned of an entity called central hypotonia, ...
3
votes
2answers
185 views

Pneumonia in children after abdominal operations

This textbook says: Consequently, young children are prone to suffer from pneumonia after abdominal operations, because they resist breathing (being abdominal) due to pain. As a result the ...
3
votes
2answers
121 views

How do we know that mild forms of rabies are nonexistent?

Wikipedia's rabies article says: "Death usually occurs 2 to 10 days after first symptoms. Survival is almost unknown once symptoms have presented, even with the administration of proper and intensive ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

What ailments used to be completely fatal (or nearly so) but, now modern medicine has a treatment or cure?

My brother was a Type 1 diabetic and back in high school I did a report on diabetes. One of the things that struck me was that before 1921, type 1 diabetes was basically 100% fatal. I was wondering ...
2
votes
0answers
416 views

Why is there such a large evening rise of temperature and night sweats in certain diseases like TB, lymphoma etc?

I've heard that it's got to do something with the levels of cortisol which usually dampens the effects of IL-1, but when it's night time the cortisol levels are usually low so IL-1 response is ...
9
votes
4answers
3k views

What are the consequences of inbreeding?

Inbreeding increases the risk of getting two identical recessive genes, alleles, that cause a disease which wouldn't have been activated with mixed genes. That's how I understand it anyway. But I ...
8
votes
1answer
303 views

Do “scars” in humans replace all the skin layers or only some layers?

When someone has a cut or surgical incision that results in a "scar", is the scar tissue replacing all 3 layers of the skin (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis)? Or only the first one or two of them?
3
votes
0answers
43 views

Relationship between inbreeding and sterility in humans

In general, inbred individuals tend to be at increased risk of sterility as shown in cows (Gonzales-Recio, 2007) or in leghorns (Nordskog and Cheng, 1988) for examples. I only have very quickly looked ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Why is free ribose not reduced to deoxyribose rather than the reduction occuring on ribonucleotides

I cannot understand why deoxyribonucleotides are not synthesized directly from deoxyribose, but ribonucleotides have to be synthesized first, and only then can deoxyribonucleotides be synthesized.
0
votes
2answers
90 views

How having sickle cell trait would provide resistance to malarial parasites?

It's mentioned in my textbook that subjects with sickle cell trait develop resistance to malaria. I've read a few research papers predisposing involvement of macrophages and papers asserting ...
0
votes
2answers
94 views

Why is beta thalassemia major not lethal while alpha thalassemia with loss of all 4 genes lethal?

So why is beta thalassemia major with two B0 alleles not fatal in utero (despite the hemoglobin not having any B chains), while alpha thalassemia with deletion of all 4 genes encoding for the alpha ...
1
vote
2answers
98 views

Could a human become infected with rabies in such a way that even prior vaccination wouldn't stop the infection?

Given the highly persistent nature of rabies after entering the brain, I was wondering whether certain ways of exposure to this virus could be risky even for a previously vaccinated individual. I ...
6
votes
1answer
296 views

Reason for variation in the site of onset of edema

What is the reason for the observed clinical difference in the earliest site of onset of edema in cases of different etiologies? For example, in Congestive Heart Failure, it appears initially as ...
-1
votes
1answer
69 views

Is it theoretically possible to safely eliminate most viruses in the atmosphere, hence preemptively cure all the viral diseases? [closed]

Could we create a genetically modified virus or bacteria (with inability to mutate into something dangerous for animals) that would quickly spread all over the planet and selectively kill most of the ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Is hydroxyproline an amino acid? (Classification question)

So I know that hydroxyproline is created from proline via hydroxylation as a post-translational modification. I also know that proline is considered an amino acid. However, once you hydroxylize it, ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Which kind of drugs get absorbed through epidermis?

Some drugs such as nicotine can be administered through skin. I thought the layers of skin are designed to prevent in-flow of any chemical/germs. Not all drugs get absorbed in this fashion. So do ...