Questions tagged [medicine]

Medicine is the doctrine of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases and injuries in humans and animals. Health and medicine questions are off-topic unless dealing with the biology underlying health and medicine. Please carefully explore the tour, help centre, and meta before posting health and medicine questions.

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2
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1answer
148 views

How might IV-saline cause kidney damage that seems to be less likely with “balanced fluids” IVs instead?

The ABC News article What's in the IV bag? Studies show safer option than saline includes: Saline — salt dissolved in water — has been the most widely used fluid in the U.S. for more than a century ...
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2answers
114 views

Why is full cell/high antigen dose pertussis vaccine dangerous for adults?

I do remember that I have read (or heard) somewhere that as a human is older, the whole cell vaccine (and high antigen dose one) has more and more adverse effects. As it is consistent with the target ...
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1answer
53 views

Could Cannabidiol steady a hand? [closed]

Can Cannabidiol be used to steady shaky or nervous hand for precision work like surgery? I have used it for shooting pool/billiards and I'm not sure if it is a placebo or it is helping? but I am ...
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0answers
32 views

What are some good examples of open-source articles in which the synergy of two medicines is demonstrated?

I am doing research on Stochastic Cooperative Game Theory (a subfield in mathematics), which I will henceforth call SCGT for convenience. In this theory, entities can work together to receive a bigger ...
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1answer
83 views

Rabies virus mortality [duplicate]

Why rabies virus has nearly 100% fatality rate in human (see this virology blog; thanks to @iayork for the link) if not vaccinated early, even some people have survived Ebola, then why does rabies doe ...
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4answers
5k views

Why have a placebo control group when testing a new drug if existing drugs can be used?

It is general practice to compare a new treatment against a sham treatment (placebo), and then use those results to compare efficacy of the new treatment (call it B) to an existing treatment (call it ...
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1answer
36 views

Genetics… Translocation

Can a Translocation of chromosomal parts occur between an autosome and an allosome? If it occurs in between allosomes,what could be the effect of Robertsonian Translocation between an X and a Y ...
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0answers
12 views

Embolism risk in cancer [closed]

Why is there an increased risk of embolism in any malignancy? I studied that malignancy is a risk factor for pulmonary embolism. Can someone explain me the exact mechanism under which malignancy ...
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1answer
2k views

Why cornstarch for athlete's feet?

It seems like a lot of foot (anti-odor or antifungal) powders are often based off of cornstarch (i.e., as the primary filler). But wouldn't cornstarch (which, in some places, is also a common food ...
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1answer
126 views

What happens if you intake pure magnesium? [closed]

We know that body needs a certain amount of magnesium. Why are magnesium supplements in the form of magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, etc?
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0answers
221 views

Why do erythrocytes have no MHC1 but platelets do?

Red blood cells do not have a considerable number of MHC1 through their membranes, and that's explained by them not having a nucleus. But why do platelets have MHC1s if they have no nucleus either? I ...
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0answers
167 views

How medical studies induce cancer in lab animals?

To test the effectiveness of drugs, they are typically tested on animals. How cancer is induced in lab animals to test the effectiveness of cancer drugs?
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0answers
116 views

Can you “fight” a coma or serious illness?

In an article about the latest earthquake to strike Mexico, I read that a rescuer said to someone in a gurney, "Fight for your life, please!" I've seen similar things in TV shows and movies where a ...
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1k views

How fast can the human body temperature change?

I'm really curious about how fast can a human body temperature change? E.g. how fast can the human body temperature change when the human has fever? I'm not interested in how fast fever changes the ...
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0answers
21 views

Using Transduction to reverse Antibiotic Resistance?

Is it possible to use reverse transduction to reverse antibiotic resistance. Since antibitiotic resistance is causee by transduction of the F factor, is it possible to induce a F+ non antibiotic ...
3
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1answer
139 views

How does adjuvant enhance the immunogenicity of antigen? [closed]

My question is, How does adjuvant enhance immunogenicity of antigen? I just want to know deeply about it , Any suggestions will be helpful!
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0answers
736 views

What are those brown scars in the eyes? [closed]

I have recently realised that one of my friends had brown scars or marks inside his eyes. He says that he doesn't know what they are and has been there since young. What could this possibly be ? Are ...
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0answers
72 views

Placebo effect and why they work [closed]

I'm just wondering how the placebo effect works on people. If a patient is given fake drugs , how does that make him better? So what if they feel more "assured", how would that help the body immunity (...
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4answers
816 views

Why does an increased heart rate mean increased blood pressure?

Say a person starts exercising. If their cardiac volume remains the same but their heart rate increases so that the overall result is an increase in cardiac output, will their blood pressure increase ...
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0answers
312 views

How does Reissner's membrane rupture cause Ménière's disease symptoms?

In Ménière's disease, an ednolymphatic hydrops (EH) in scala media leads to a distention and, eventually, rupture of Reissner's membrane. This results in an influx of K+-rich endolymph into the Na+-...
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0answers
78 views

Which organs can be donated after clinical death?

The information I found about organ donation does not address clinical death. For example: The process of donation takes place only after physicians declare a person brain dead [...] cessation of ...
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0answers
19 views

Trying to make a homogeneous phantom

I am making a T1 weighted phantom for an MRI project. It consists of distilled boiling water, 7g/L agar, 10g/L NaCl and 1g/L CuS04. As the phantom cools it will get a jelly like texture. What I would ...
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0answers
153 views

Familial Hypercholesterolemia

Why does Familial Hypercholesterolemia shows autosomal dominant pattern? Let us take that there is mutation in LDL receptor gene, it is said that: The LDL receptor gene is located on the short arm ...
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1answer
3k views

How does the immune system fight scabies mites?

After a distressing episode involving my elderly mother and a nursing home, I've been reading up on scabies. It seems that in healthy people, the immune system limits the mite population to around 10 ...
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1answer
472 views

Why is methanol poisonous?

What should we do when someone is diagnosed with the methanol poisoning What harm does methanol cause on our body, such as the harm to some proteins? What first-aid measures should we take?
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3answers
102 views

Global database for patients with rare and important injuries or disease?

I was recently reading Christof Koch's The Quest for Consciousness, and several times he mentioned how important some patients with sad and terrible brain injuries were for the understanding of the ...
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4answers
3k views

What are the consequences of inbreeding?

Inbreeding increases the risk of getting two identical recessive genes, alleles, that cause a disease which wouldn't have been activated with mixed genes. That's how I understand it anyway. But I ...
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1answer
48 views

How can I list genes present on a given series of bands?

My question is related to this one. My interest relate to this deletion: del(7)(q11q36)[12] as defined by ISCN. I would like to access a list of the genes found on the bands 11 to 36 of the 7th ...
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1answer
256 views

Understanding a Chromosomal formula in a karytope analysis

I am reading a medical reporting results of a karyotype analysis. On it it is written: Chromosomal formula 46,XX,del(7)(q11q36)[12]/46,XX[13] I understand that ...
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1answer
1k views

Why is western blotting used to confirm positive ELISA HIV tests?

I know that when an ELISA test indicates a positive result for HIV, a western blot is done to confirm. When I search online for the reason why, all that I see is that western blotting is "more ...
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0answers
38 views

Biomedical consensus on human aging and lifespan [closed]

Medical technology is improving quickly. Unless there is a global disaster and human progress is set back significantly, e.g. by an asteroid or a global nuclear war, there will come a day when humans ...
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0answers
38 views

Can improper/inadequate exhalation in humans trigger migraines? [closed]

Is there any relation between one's breathing pattern and occurrence of headaches? How does inadequate exhalation affect humans?
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2answers
154 views

Why do doctors use a new thread for each stitch?

Why do doctors use a new thread of the same kind for each stitch instead of using a single thread for the entire stitch?
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0answers
290 views

Do animals get “unhealthily” fat in the wild?

Looking at a picture of a seriously fat cat, apparently directly nurtured by humans, popping up in a language learning app, I started wondering: do animals "in the wild" (this might be ambiguous, but ...
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3answers
4k views

Why is insulin given in type 2 diabetes?

For this reason "insulin insensitivity", or a decrease in insulin receptor signaling, leads to diabetes mellitus type 2 – the cells are unable to take up glucose, and the result is hyperglycemia (an ...
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1answer
211 views

Is it possible to synthesize chiral version of an organism (incompatible with our pathogens)?

In theory, it should be possible to synthesize chiral (mirror image) version of some organism: with all molecules replaced with their enantiomers, e.g. L-sugars in place of our D-sugars. Direct ...
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2answers
127 views

Pneumonia in children after abdominal operations

This textbook says: Consequently, young children are prone to suffer from pneumonia after abdominal operations, because they resist breathing (being abdominal) due to pain. As a result the ...
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1answer
71 views

Where are epitopes located on HLA molecules?

Normally HLA molecules present cellular and extra cellular proteins to the immune system; presumably the proteins in this case are where antibody /t-cells etc bind. But when an organ is transplanted ...
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1answer
1k views

Anti malarial drugs and g6pd deficiency

Why does antimalarial drugs causes hemolysis in g6pd deficiency patients? I know that g6pd protects the cell from oxidative stress by maintaining glutathione in reduced state but how does the ...
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0answers
38 views

What risk does the insulin pump hack carry?

Recently, a OneTouch system was hacked, potentially allowing any malicious attacks, draining the pump into someone's bloodstream: Jay Radcliffe, a diabetic and researcher with cyber security firm ...
4
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1answer
13k views

Pathophysiology of pink frothy sputum in pulmonary edema

Pulmonary edema is a condition where fluid leaks into the alveolar spaces. This can be due to to hemodynamic causes like left heart failure and pulmonary venous obstruction or microvascular injury or ...
3
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1answer
705 views

How does hyperthyroidism cause diarrhea?

According to Robbin's Pathology, hyperthyroidism leads to an overactivity of the sympathetic system. It also goes on to mention that this sympathetic hyperstimulation in the gut leads to increased ...
3
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0answers
336 views

Difference between dysentery and bloody diarrhea

The difference between diarrhoea and dysentery is quite clear; but the appearance of blood in stool or bloody diarrhoea is a very confusing term when compared with dysentery. Are they different in the ...
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0answers
144 views

Diazepam with Aluminum Hydroxide

Some common medicinal preparations contain diazepam with aluminium Hydroxide, there may be other compounds [e.g. magnesium trisilicate and polydimethylsiloxane with Aluminum Hydroxide and Diazepam as ...
3
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4answers
998 views

Are there dichotomous keys for identifying medical conditions?

I know dichotomous keys are often used to identify flora and fauna. I was wondering if they are also used in medicine for identifying diseases -- are they? If not, why not?
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2answers
25k views

Why and where do red blood cells die?

Textbooks commonly state that red blood cells are removed by the liver and spleen. Do those organs destroy the red blood cells within capillaries that course through those organs or are they ...
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0answers
161 views

How does having an empty stomach affect absorption of compounds?

From personal experience, compounds such as nicotine, caffeine and alchohol appear to absorb much quicker into the blood on an 'empty' stomach', or after extended periods of fasting. If this is the ...
6
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1answer
293 views

Reason for variation in the site of onset of edema

What is the reason for the observed clinical difference in the earliest site of onset of edema in cases of different etiologies? For example, in Congestive Heart Failure, it appears initially as ...
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1answer
139 views

Accommodation mechanism. [closed]

Can anyone explain how contraction of the ciliary muscles causes relaxation of the zonules? Please explain it anatomically i.e. the attachments of ciliary muscles and its relation with the ...
5
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1answer
150 views

Are there diseases for which a placebo treatment is state of the art?

I was reading about the placebo effect, and I wondered if there exists or ever existed a disease with the following properties: There are no known treatments for the disease that perform better than ...