Questions tagged [microbiology]

Microbiology is the study of extremely small organisms. This includes organisms like bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses.

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How are logarithmic trendline equations used to determine antibody concentrations in ELISA?

For example, say you have plotted a standard curve and managed to obtain a logarithimic trendline equation like: y = mln(x) - b And you are working with data that includes: a) standards,their ...
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sperm reaction of virus infected

we know when a human body cell infected by a virus , create interferon 1 to call other cells that surrounded it , but red blood cells couldn't do this because they loose their nuclear and other ...
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Paper shows 2 hours of high humidity and hot temperatures kills corona virus, does this stop the spread of the virus?

I found this paper (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2863430/) which says these corona virus strains live for months at 4 degrees C, 20% relative humidity. But at 40 degrees C and 80% ...
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Does parasitism, one of Bacteria's lifestyle?

The parasite is an organism that lives in or on a host. It depends on its host for survival. Bacteria lives in decaying organic matter, within human organism (colon, oral cavity). It can be a ...
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Where can I obtain Sputnik virophage samples?

I'm working on a project where I'm trying to use virophages as viral vectors in introducing CRISPR-Cas proteins into other viruses. I was wondering where I might be able to find replication-defective ...
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Immunity to one's own microbiome

It seems that a human bite can be very dangerous, because of the myriads of bacterial species found in saliva. This leads to several questions that, perhaps, may have the same single answer. But, I'...
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A question about dicumarol

I know that dicumarol was discovered in moldy sweet clover as it caused hemorrhage in cattles, but if someone had thromboembolic disorders causing uncontrolled thrombosis,would it be fine to eat moldy ...
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Virus Mortality Selection

This question is related to the recent Wuhan outbreak. Currently, mortality rate for the virus is somewhere around 2-3%. This is much lower than say, SARS (9.5%) and MERS (34.5%). As a thought ...
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What's the purpose of segregating a virus from the blood and growing it in the lab?

I heard that the scientist in Australia found a way to segregate the 2019 NovCoronovirus from the blood. Does this mean they are one step closer to the cure? Why is virus segregation crucial in ...
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Are there any known microbes capable of living in almost pure carbon dioxide?

Some bioengineering is investigated in high carbon dioxide environments. Are there any microbes like bacteria or Archaea capable of living and multiplying in such environments?
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What are the constraints on an operon?

From what I understand, the term operon is loosely defined to be a collection of genes that are found to be in the same proximity in a genome. Some definitions enforce that an operon is only ...
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Is PrEP used for anything other than HIV?

In the field of HIV prevention, PrEP is an abbreviation of pre-exposure prophylaxis. This is a very generic term. Are any diseases other than HIV prevented using a similar approach? Do they use the ...
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What makes iodine an effective antiseptic?

I'm thinking about tincture of iodine, potassium iodide (Lugol's), and povidone-iodine (PVP-I) specifically, which, as is my understanding, work by solubilizing elemental iodine in an aqueous solution....
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Can microbes become “overweight”?

Just out of some weird thoughts, can a microbe (any single-celled organisms, accepting answers for both prokaryotes and eukaryotes) ingest too much food (e.g. via absorbing too much involuntarily ...
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Why do archaea survive better in extremes than bacteria?

Why have bacteria not evolved to fill the extreme environments to the same extent as archaea? What has enabled archaea to colonize these areas when bacteria do not?
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A theory about the possible connection between protists and first animalia

I learnt that organisms within Kingdom Animalia can be either microanimals or (nonmicro)animals. a microanimal is any Kingdom Animalia organism that in general cannot be seen by a human eye without ...
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Why did isopropyl alcohol not work as a disinfectant for E. coli in this experiment?

I recently performed a lab to test different concentrations (20-99%) of isopropyl alcohol and its inhibition of E. coli growth. My control was an antibacterial disk, and what I did was I dabbed the ...
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Using autoclaved store-bought distilled water for labwork?

I'm a high school student who's working on a molecular biology project in my school's lab. I need pure water for making culture media, buffers, running a BCA protein assay, running digests, cleaning ...
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How do mutations of viruses lead to drug resistance?

For instance, after starting zidovudine monotherapy against HIV, resistance develops against the drug because of a point mutation in the RNA transcriptase enzyme to which the drug binds. So how does ...
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What is the simplest way to demonstrate the germicidal property of UV light?

This is intended for a high school project. I am familiar with the one that studies growth of e coli over time in a petri dish but I a bit concerned about as to how safe a demonstration of this nature ...
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Why does atrazine kill photosynthetic bacteria and not nonphotosynthetic bacteria?

Atrazine was found to bind to Qb, which is involved in electron transport to create ATP in photosynthetic bacteria. Why does this herbicide kill photosynthetic bacteria, while having little to no ...
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Can a bacterium express a virulence gene and not produce toxins and what may be the cause of this?

I am preparing a seminar on viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in bacteria, mainly foodborne pathogens and I just saw this line in a journal article by Lothigius et al that "the expression of the ...
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Ideas for microbiology lab. Antimicrobial properties of cutting boards

I am an undergraduate student in Biology and I am trying to design a microbiology lab that will takes 3 weeks to carry out (1-2 day each week). I am going to examine the antimicrobial properties of ...
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Does more ATP present mean that a microbe can ferment more and decrease the pH? [closed]

I noticed that EMP produces 2 ATP and EDP produces 1 ATP. Does that mean that if more ATP is present that would give more energy for fermentation and lowering the pH of a system?
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Which culture media is suitable for cheek epithelial cells?

A month ago, I tried isolating cheek cells from saliva and the experiment was a success, however, I was wondering if it is possible to cultivate these cells in vitro. I'd say it's possible, but I wasn'...
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Can I sterilize the equipment for experiments without an autoclave?

If I don't have access to an autoclave, can I sterilize my equipment in a regular pot. If so, what time is needed at about 110°C (I measured inside) for a proper sterilization?
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Which bacteria takes the longest to double?

Currently I am writing a lab report on the enumeration of bacteria. E.coli takes about 30 mins to double. That is going from 1 bacteria to 2 bacteria. I want to know which bacteria takes the ...
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What is meant by Physarum polycephalum having 720 sexes?

There is currently some media hype about the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, which will soon be exhibited in the Paris zoo. This was my first time hearing about slime molds, but so far so good. ...
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How can Haemophilus influenzae survive and grow alone in the human body?

Haemophilus influenzae gets its name from the fact, that it requires nutrients from blood in order to grow. More specifically, I see it mentioned that in vitro they often exhibit the pheomenon that ...
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Cleaning Masterclave

When i finish operation. My masterclave has smell, I think has media moulecular bind into the surface and microbial can live in. My labs don't have SOP to clean it. I promote use detergent but wonder ...
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Why is synthesis of tetanospasmin advantageous to C. tetani?

The tetanospasmin is a neurotoxin synthesised by some strains of C. tetani. It is the factor causing tetanus, but what is its role for the bacteria itself? I do not believe the main objective of C. ...
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How do I prepare a Basal medium for autotrophic mutant creation

Minimal medium (MM) was prepared by adding 2.0 g sodium nitrate (NaNO3) to 1 L of basal medium (BM) fol- lowing Correll et al. (1987). Chlorate resistant sectors (CRSs) were generated on two media i.e....
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Bacterial Growth Formula

What are the units of $N$: the colonies of bacteria or the viable cell count? This is in regards to the bacterial growth formula used during serial dilutions, $$ N =N(0) e^{kt} \quad . $$
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Autoclaving media Question

1.When I autoclave media should I close the cap tightly or slightly? I put all tools in plastic bag when I autoclave, should I close slightly the plastic and when it finish I close tightly the ...
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Are most pathogenic bacteria facultative anaerobes?

I know that S. aureus and most gram-negative rods are facultative anaerobes. In terms of number of species, are most human pathogen-associated bacteria facultative anaerobes?
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Which species of rotifer is this?

If found this in a moss sample.
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How could be the concentration of airborne pathogens in a specific indoor space be measured?

I wonder if it is possible to measure the concentration of airborne pathogens in a specific indoor space in order to extract a percentage value. This value would be helpful to determine specific ...
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Is there a minimum load below which an infectious agent will not cause disease?

Suppose a single smallpox virus is injected in an human adult's body. Will it cause disease in the host? Is there a minimum microbial load below which it will not cause disease?
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Why don't we have vaccination against all diseases caused by microbes?

People can be vaccinated against certain diseases. Principle of vaccination is to use live attenuated load or inactivated. My question is - why we dont have vaccination against all diseases which are ...
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What disease does Saccharopolyspora erythraea cause?

For an examination assignment I have to find a disease caused by the bacterial species Saccharopolyspora erythraea, but I have searched the internet and have found no report of patients being infected ...
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Water sample preservation

I am taking my students to collect water samples from different bodies of water. These bodies of water include the local river, a park pond, and water accumulation from recent rain. Once we gather the ...
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Growth rate oscillation in the a population of non-interacting bacteria

I have come across this theoretical paper claiming that if you start a batch culture from a single E. coli cell, the exponential growth rate of the population defined as $$k = \frac1N \frac{dN}{dt}$$ ...
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Is bacillus strain 2-9-3 really 250 million year old?

I've read that in the last decade (I believe) some scientists discovered a microorganism, which they dubbed bacillus strain 2-9-3, in a crystal of salt that they think is 250 million years old and ...
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Diffussion coefficient of blood

What it the diffusion coefficient of blood in, e.g. water? It is needed for microchannel length calculations I have found a bit different nubmers: 0.94 and 1.66 microns^2/ms, but not sure
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Is there any double staining method to visualise separate colour for plant tissue and fungal tissue?

Is there any double staining method for developing separate colour on fungal tissue and plant tissue when the said 2 types of tissues are intermingled? Unlike my previous question, this question not ...
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How DNA probe binds

I am studying about southern hybridization now and I've a doubt.After the DNA has been fragmented using restriction enzymes and obtained on nitrocellulose blot , it is still double stranded (the ...
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How do carbon 13:12 ratios confirm the biological origin of oldest microfossils?

I was reading this article about how Schopf and Valley’s findings in 2017 confirmed that the 3.5 billion–year-old microfossils found in the Apex chert of Western Australia are indeed remnants of ...
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Can exposure to blood make pathogens resistant to the immune system?

If a drop of my blood is dropped into a pool of pathogens. Does that act as "reverse-vaccination" for said pathogens? I see this it as a potential risk for bacteria/viruses to compete or get ...
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Species diversity in cheese and yoghurt?

There have been studies on the number of species on humans and in various other environments. I was wondering how many species including: viruses, bacteria, yeasts, and fungi inhabit ordinary farm ...
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What enzyme or bacteria could dissolve plastic?

What enzyme or bacteria could dissolve plastic aside from acetone? Preferably, low-cost and environmentally friendly. Any suggestions would be helpful. I'm targeting for thin plastic (low-density ...

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