Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [molecular-genetics]

The scientific study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level, particularly chromosomes and DNA.

2
votes
1answer
64 views

If post transcriptional modification happens , how can a gene code for amino acids in a particular order? [duplicate]

Post transcription, introns are removed and exons are rearranged randomly. If that's the case (which it is according to the book EDEXCEL SNAB A2 topic 6) then shouldn't the protein produced be ...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

Organisms that use more than the 20+2 commonly occurring amino acids?

I know scientists have created synthetic bacteria, with a genetic code containing 6 letters instead of 4, with the aim of creating more complex proteins (using amino acids outside of the standard 20+2,...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Is the holiday model an anomaly in terms of the general genetic principle?

In terms of the holiday model, the chromosomes can form a cruciform structure. When nicked vertically, both arms of the chromosomes contain crossover DNA (see part f of diagram). However, it is ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Cloning a coding gene into a non-expression vector

Does it make any sense to clone a CODING gene into a NON-expression vector? doing this will only give us multiple copies of the gene, while we could run PCR instead (Let's say we know the gene ...
5
votes
2answers
82 views

Are redundant codons used in translation?

I am learning about redundancy in genetics and I came across this statement in my textbook: more than one codon for an amino acid means that some codons are redundant - the process of protein ...
1
vote
1answer
18 views

Will DNA nanostructures be useful for medical applications?

There is a lot of work being done on developing small nanomechanical structures and even small nanomechanical actuators built with DNA. I have heard researchers motivate this research with claims ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

How does DNA code for the actual *shape* of individual body parts/areas (NOT segments or Hox genes)?

Just to save the trouble - I am not asking for general information on how DNA codes for proteins and definitely not how Hox genes work. I have a very good understanding of the evolutionary process and ...
5
votes
1answer
99 views

What are the potential dangers (if any) facing the twin girls recently born in China with their CCR5 gene modified?

According to this Nature news article, a Chinese researcher claims to have made the world's first genome-edited baby using the popular CRISPR–Cas9 genome-editing tool. A gene called CCR5 was modified ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Why does the HLA show a high degree of polymorphism?

I know how the HLA undergoes high degree of polymorphism (random genetic rearrangements), but I have not understood why it undergoes rearrangements. What is the advantage offered when HLA shows a high ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

Name of dsRNA (or dsDNA) where all strands are identical

What is the name of dsRNA (or DNA) where all component strands are identical (i.e. where the complex consists of multiple copies of the same ssRNA)? Example: 2 identical ssRNAs forming a dsRNA ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Gene activation vs Homology Directed Repair

In the context of gene therapy or similiar genetic modifications, is HDR the only way to achieve gene activation? Take CRISPR for example. Gene knockout is often discussed, but not activation. Does ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

How exactly does heterozygous sickle trait help patients survive malaria

Heterozygous sickle cell anaemia trait is known to increase the survival rate of carriers to malaria attacks. How does a recessive gene not expressed in the phenotype allow for such an advantage? Is ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Are there E-sites on eukaryotic ribosomes?

One of my professors mentioned something about the e-site (the exit site for the t-RNA) on a eukaryotic ribosome. There was a student in the class who objected, saying that there is no e-site on ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Does the deletion of Chromosome 20 cause immunity against prion disease?

I was reading recently about prion disease and it caught my attention that a normal prion protein is coded n chromosome 20, therefore, in order for an infectious prion protein to attack, there must be ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Agrobacterium tumefaciens risks vs effectiveness

Are there genes in Agrobacterium that are analogous to lacZ found in enteric bacteria, and if so what genes are they. Does A. tumefaciens have orthologs for starch and glucose use? How risky is ...
2
votes
0answers
45 views

Is there any example of genetic mechanism of delayed onset toxic effects?

We know that exposure to many toxic chemicals during embryonic development may show toxic effects later in life. It is called Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHAD). Most of the ...
2
votes
1answer
39 views

How to find idea for essay [closed]

I'm studying microbiology in Iran The university that I'm studying in doesn't provide that much help in research areas and we don't get to research or write essays that much ,while I'm trying to write ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Insertion Confirmation Cloning Strategy

So I am in a bit of a time constraint. Essentially, I inserted a DNA fragment via molecular cloning which contains a unique RE site. I need to confirm whether my colony has or does not have the ...
19
votes
4answers
3k views

Are mutations a source of genetic variation?

Here is a question from the book SAT II Success Biology E/M (where the SAT is the exam taken by the American high school students): Which of the following statements is true about mutations? (A) ...
10
votes
3answers
540 views

Why did scientists think humans had 100,000 genes (before the Human Genome Project)?

One of the major results of the Human Genome Project (HGP) was that humans have far fewer separate genes than previously thought. From a 2004 article about the HGP: Francis S. Collins, director of ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Ratio PD:NPD:TT in tetrad analysis

In tetrad anlysis in yeast it is often used that if two genes are unlinked and far from centromere, the expected PD:NPD:TT ratio is 1:1:4, i.e. we are getting PD and NPD each with probablity 1/6 and ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Meting temperature of PCR products and product expected size

I know the Melting temperature of my primers but I would like to know if the melting temperature of my product match with the melting temperature I get in the melting curve when doing a qPCR, in order ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

What does “novel, predicted deleterious, within autozygome” mean in genetics?

I am a medical student and just got involved with a genetic lab and research. I read a lot phrases like: "Although no mutations have been reported in this gene, we think this variant is interesting ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Is it theoretically possible to safely eliminate most viruses in the atmosphere, hence preemptively cure all the viral diseases? [closed]

Could we create a genetically modified virus or bacteria (with inability to mutate into something dangerous for animals) that would quickly spread all over the planet and selectively kill most of the ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

EJ138 bladder cancer cell line

My question is about EJ138 bladder cancer cell line. Is there any mutation in this cell line, esp in TP53 gene?
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Thousands of Reporters Integrated in Parallel (TRIP) barcodes

Has anyone worked with constructing barcodes for TRIP? How does constructing of barcodes work in general? I don't seem to be able to grasp the basics of constructing these barcodes.
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Why are okazaki fragments of eukaryotes smaller? [duplicate]

Prokaryotes have bigger fragments as compared to eukaryotes. Why so ?
4
votes
2answers
152 views

How does transcription end?

In rho-dependent termination in prokaryotes, how does RNA polymerase “know” that it has reached the end of a gene and that it has to stop so that the rho-factor can bind mRNA’s rut site? Is there a ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

Young family members to learn genetics - Amino Labs? [closed]

I'm an engineer but want to learn about biology with a niece and nephew who are early teens. I saw Amino Labs (https://amino.bio/) and thought because I work a lot with my hands, doing hands on ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

How do PrP mutations lead to prion disease?

My understanding is: The PrP gene in human cells is expressed as both PrP-c (normal protein) and PrP-sc (prion disease protein). This happens post transcriptionally, that is, the normal and the ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

What is the role of CRISPR-dCas9 in gRNA-dCas9 transcription regulator complexes?

In this paper, I read that mutant versions of Cas proteins such as a deactivated Cas9 (dCas9) are used alongside a guide-RNA (gRNA) to form variants of CRISPR tool that can function as transcription ...
0
votes
2answers
143 views

Can a viable embryo develop from the fusion of two egg cells?

For a zygote to form, two haploid gametes undergo meiosis and fuse during fertilisation. Since two egg cells (or even two sperm cells) are both haploid, is it theoretically possible for them to make ...
5
votes
1answer
106 views

How does DNA codon (5`-3`) convert to mRNA?

There is a problem I stumbled upon when doing a lesson on molecular genetics (Grade 12 level). The lesson contains many tables in this format: I don't understand how it got to the mRNA codon ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

About The Selfish Gene Book - How Replicators Molecules forms duplicates?

I was reading The Selfish Gene. In the 2nd chapter - "Replicators" I read: Think of the replicator as a mold or template. Imagine it as a large molecule consisting of a complex chain of various ...
2
votes
0answers
78 views

True examples of common variation due to Mendelian Inheritance

Classic examples of mendelian inheritance are genetic diseases such as sickle-cell anemia, Tay-Sachs, cystic fibrosis, and xeroderma pigmentosa. For some of these diseases, it is believed that they ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How to calculate the Marker Index(MI) for a dominant marker such as RAPD and ISSR?

I am working in the genetic diversity analysis of a plant species and have used RAPD and ISSR markers. After scoring the data in a binary matrix, I am trying to find the marker index of the primers. I ...
2
votes
2answers
54 views

What dictates which protein to synthesize at a given time?

I understand how DNA is replicated and how it directs the synthesis of proteins from amino acids through RNA polymerase, RNA and ribosomes. Now I want to understand how it works in the big picture. ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Question Concerning Plasmid Transplant

Upon reading a report today, I discovered a interesting technic of plasmid transformation. Triparental Conjugation, a bacterial conjugation including three parts , a conjugative plasmid, a donor cell ,...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Increasing my PCR efficiency to be able to better visualise my bands

I run an electrophoresis in agarose gel and my expected bands are extremely week, is even hard to see them. It looks I need to increase my PCR efficiency. I have read about a Hot start setp, which ...
-1
votes
2answers
109 views

Do all retroviruses evolve into dna viruses? [closed]

Since even nonprocreative sex transfers genetic material it seems redundant for viruses to destroy the host. Retroviruses are sufficiently simple to fit into DNA. So why not just become DNA viruses?
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Isolation of Intact Granules from Mast Cells

How to isolate intact granules from mast cells without using sucrose and percoll?
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Is it Theoretically Possible to Create a Male clone from the donor Cell of a Female?

I understand that Dolly the Sheep was created without the presence of a sperm cell. Instead, nucleus DNA from somatic cells of adult sheep were used. Since Dolly was female, i am assuming that the ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

primer blast for BSP methylation

How can I blast my BSP(Bisulfite sequencing) primers? I designed in this way that C nucleotide converted to T and my primers just sit on the converted DNA! I blast it with Bisearch but I don't know ...
1
vote
1answer
15 views

Is there a biological explanation for a 0.5 difference in allele size with PCR product?

CONTEXT I am currently working on a set of diversity, this diversity in interspecific (within the same genus). I am using SSR markers, the primers were designed on one species and are working really ...
2
votes
0answers
33 views

how can I get stronger staining for my lymph node sections

I am using the same protocol and same antibodies that the literature says but still I cannot get good staining for my lymph node sections, I tried to change the fixation method and I am using now ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Control for Bisulfite sequencing

I am wondering how can I control my converted DNA! I converted my DNA with bisulfite then I amplified the converted DNA with specific primers of BSP and purified my product and finally sequenced the ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

Expected bands in polyacrylamide gel

I have something in my notes that doesn't seem right. If I use restriction enzymes on a PCR product how many bands should I see provided I know the restriction enzimes will cut the DNA? If I use two ...
2
votes
1answer
52 views

Antibiotic resistance

I have a biological puzzle that's been perplexing me for years. Can you review my logic and tell me where I'm wrong or if I'm on to something. As I understand it, most, if not all genetic ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

How do I reverse my insert within a plasmid?

I have a plasmid with: ...T7pro. -- RBS -- XBa1 cut site -- ProDpro. -- RBS -- AmilCP -- T -- Spe1 cut site -- T... How do I design primers to reverse the portion in bold, such that the T7 and ProD ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

What are the types of interactions in biological network (protein networks)?

In the KGML files, the types of relations between genes or proteins are precisely activation, inhibition, expression, repression, indirect effect, state change, binding/association, dissociation, ...