Questions tagged [molecular-genetics]

The scientific study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level, particularly chromosomes and DNA.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
11 views

DNA complementarity against reverse complementarity

I am sorry to bother with this question (i study genetics for about few hours, because I need to understand my data) and I am really confused about these two terms, because I dont know if the books ...
-2
votes
0answers
27 views

Can microwave energy cause testicular cancer?

I've heard that contrary to popular belief, microwaves are not able to cause cancer as they are non-ionizing (i.e. everything from radiowaves to visible light) unlike UV light, X- rays, or Gamma waves....
0
votes
0answers
17 views

What are the effect of radioactivity on grey wolves in Chernobyl?

I am doing some research about the effects that radioactivity has and is having on grey wolves in Chernobyl and more particularly on their genetics, but maybe also looking at the populations in the ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

UCP1-3826 A>G rs1800592 different effects in moderately obese vs obese

UCP1 gene encodes an uncoupling protein which promotes the transformation of fatty acids into heat (thermogenesis) redirecting from oxidation to ATP. By merit of the fatty oxidation redirection, UCP1 ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Blood and plucked-feather sample storage

This next field season I will be collecting both blood and feather samples and I wondered how best to store the samples. The blood samples will be used for microsatellite and/or SNP analysis. The ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Exact average molecular weight of a dsDNA basepair

I am trying to calculate the exact weight of a given dsDNA. On the Internet and the literature, different values for the av. molecular weight of one basepair are given : 660 g/mol (probably wrong), ...
4
votes
2answers
117 views

What is the difference between non-coding and intergenic regions?

The initial question was about understanding what is in the downstream of a gene in a eukaryotic organism. I understand that this region is located 3' of a gene, and therefore I would expect to find ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Questions regarding transformation in bacterial cells

First off, in transformation the donor DNA aligns itself with the complementary bases in the recipient DNA. Now a "perfect" alignment of the donor DNA ( Sorry if my terminologies are ...
-2
votes
1answer
34 views

What is the difference between mutation per base pair and mutation per genome? [closed]

Isn't genome size considered to be the number of base pairs present in DNA? So what is the difference between the mutation per base pair and mutation per genome? Are they similar or different?
0
votes
0answers
26 views

How does the availability of a reference genome aid in microsatellite analysis?

I'm planning to use microsatellites to examine fine-scale population structure between several breeding colonies of birds. Most of my DNA will be extracted from feathers and the yield isn't sufficient ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Should I consider one or two DNA chains to find how many nucleotides are in a gene?

I am trying to solve an exercise. How many nucleotides does a gene contain if information about 287 amino acids is encoded in it? What is the molecular mass and length of this gene? AFAIK, I have to ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Why we need a plasmid for r-DNA technology [closed]

Recently I was studying Biotechnology. When I went through the texts, I had a doubt: both plasmids and gene of interest are made of DNA stretches and bacteria directly absorb plasmids in a test tube (...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

How do ribosomes know not to translate non-coding RNA?

I'm unclear as to the molecular mechanism whereby mRNA is translated into proteins, but non-coding RNA is not similarly translated. How do ribosomes know not to translate non-coding RNA?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Creating a phylogenetic tree from my selected publicly-available sequences (WGS) in NCBI

I'm currently writing a paper on the comparison of virulence genes for a group of bacteria. I got my data from publicly-available whole genome sequences in NCBI. Now, I want to create a phylogenetic ...
4
votes
2answers
62 views

Does the magnitude of gene-expression changes decrease the more downstream a gene is from the origin of change?

If I have a decrease or increase in expression in one gene, will the decrease/increase in expression in the downstream genes always be of a magnitude lower than the previous ones, or can they be ...
-2
votes
1answer
34 views

Could a mutation on neutral part of genome become deleterious?

I know that silent mutations are neutral because they dont affect function of the protein/gene, and a missense mutation would. But lets say both occur on a neutral portion, could one or the other ...
4
votes
2answers
82 views

Why is a solution of cesium chloride used in Meselson & Stahl's DNA replication experiment?

Centrifugation involves separating particles of different sizes, masses, density and etc. In the experiment, the DNA macromolecules are suspended in a solution of cesium chloride gradient and then ...
5
votes
1answer
144 views

A mutation question from the Indian National Biology Olympiad

DNA was isolated from wild type (Gal+) and mutant (Gal-) E. coli cells and separated by density gradient centrifugation technique. DNA from Gal- strain acquired a lower position. This indicates that ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Clarifying distinction between genetic recombination , translocation. and transposition

Having thought about the distinciton between these terms I have come up with the following definitions, are these correct? Translocation describes the relocation of a chromosomal segment to a ...
26
votes
1answer
2k views

Specific mechanism behind lethality of yellow coat color in mice

Our high school genetics chapter has some extra information about L.Cuenot. It only covered his research, and the fact that mice homozygous for yellow coat color would die before birth. It was an ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Inbreeding of selfing and outcrossing plant

I am reading John H. Gillespie's Population Genetics A Concise Guide Section 4.3 Inbreeding. I do not understand these two paragraphs quoted below concerning selfing and outcrossing. The first ...
4
votes
0answers
59 views

Reason for partially double-stranded DNA of Hepatitis B virus

According to my school biology textbook and also Wikipedia, hepatitis B is the only Hepatitis virus to possess partially double-stranded DNA. I found an image from here What is the reason for the ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Meaning of “gene expression heterogeneity” of embryonic stem cells

What does it mean if a gene has a heterogeneous expression? Does it describe the differences of patterns of expression of that particular gene in a population of cells that are identical? The papers I ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Biochemical Mechanism behind red hibiscus flower on a cream hibiscus plant

I have two 3-4 yrs old cream hibiscus shrubs in my garden. The shrubs seemed normal enough, giving cream colored petals with a red center. But soon I noticed that there are specific branches, which ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Estimate mutation rate in UVC treated cells

I am wondering how to get a coarse estimate of the number of mutation I obtain doing UVC treatment on eukaryotic cells (microalgae) starting from information such as the survival rate, genome size, ...
0
votes
1answer
76 views

Which was the first DNA-based genome to be sequenced?

The Wikipedia article on phi X 174 states that: The phi X 174 (or φX174) bacteriophage is a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus that infects Escherichia coli, and the first DNA-based genome to be ...
3
votes
0answers
37 views

Why is my DNA band bulging?

This is the only image my the TA was able to get for us. And, we're using it for our lab report. The image isn't even ours. It's another group's image that we're sharing. But I don't understand why in ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

Use of restriction endonucleases to analyse Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTRs)

The textbook I’m using states that “Ends of VNTR have conserved sequences. These can easily be cut by restriction endonucleases.” But restriction endonucleases cleave palindromic sequences. Does this ...
2
votes
1answer
86 views

How can we determine which chromosome came from which parent? [closed]

In this article there is a graph (figure 1) describing different levels of methylation in the maternal and paternal chromosomes after karyogamy. How can the researchers identify which chromosome ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

What would happen if we place denatured DNA in acidic medium?

DNA can be denatured at high temperatures or in alkaline solutions. But DNA can be annealed at low temperatures. I want to ask, could it be annealed in acidic medium?
4
votes
1answer
89 views

Why are Chromosome Territories important?

Chromosomes occupy discrete regions of the nucleus, referred to as 'Chromosome Territories'. This spatial organization is emerging as a crucial aspect of gene regulation and genome stability in health ...
-1
votes
1answer
31 views

Truncated ORF3a protein of SARS-CoV2! Why? How does it formed?

Across the world so far, we have three truncated ORF3a proteins in SARS-CoV2 in India only. Can you illuminate me how does a protein (here accessory protein of SARS-COV2) generally get such nonsense ...
1
vote
3answers
121 views

Evolution: Can the genotype frequencies change, but the allele frequencies remain constant?

If a population isn't evolving because it's in Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium, then I know that both genotype and allele frequencies must stay constant. My question is, can evolution still not occur ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Different Mutations Leading to Same Allele?

Can different mutations lead to the same allele? In my genetics books, I always see alleles referenced as, eg. Aa where A = dominant and a = recessive, but are these strictly binary phenotypes? Since ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Are Flippase Recognition Target sites read through during transcription?

I believe it is quite straight forward, but if i have a FRT site following the last exon of a gene (with the stop codon removed), would the transcription factors read through the FRT site and ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Why is the 5′ end of DNA a monophosphate?

According to my textbook: While the 5′ end of a DNA strand is typically a monophosphate, the 5′ end of an RNA molecule is typically a triphosphate. Source: Biology: How Life Works, 3rd Edition How ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

What is the word for a group of genes inherited together?

I know the words haplotype and haplogroup, as well as genetic linkage, but... I recently came across a new phrase describing genes which tend to be inherited as a group, and wrote it down, but now ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Gene knockdown vs gene knockout vs knocksideways? [closed]

How are the techniques: Knock-sideways, knockout & knock-down different?
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What exactly is a DNA molecule? [duplicate]

Are the two strands of the double helix collectively called the DNA molecule, or is each individual strand the DNA molecule?
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Meaning of “standard reactions” in a DNA extraction procedure description

From a DNA extraction procedure description (an in-house pharma document I'm translating into Russian): Preparation of Standards All the standard reactions should be prepared at least in duplicates. ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

How do the CFTR alleles interact within an individual with Cystic Fibrosis when mutations of different classes are present?

So mutations in CF are classified by the severity of the impact on the production of the CFTR. But an individual may have two different CFTR mutations. I assume that the least severe mutation of the ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Can base editors be anything else than SpCas9 and SaCas9 variants?

I found out that only variants of Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9) are used with adenine or cytidine base editors, and I was wondering why. Can Neisseria ...
-1
votes
1answer
34 views

gene inversion and DNA directionality

The directionality of the DNA goes from the 3-prime end to the 5-prime end. Thus, the inversion of a gene would connect a 5-prime to a 5-prime. How could that be? Maybe inverting a gene also ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

About genomic imprinting

In the context of genomic imprinting, how does a human cell "know" whether a chromosome is paternal or maternal(out of a homologous pair), in order to silence genes?
1
vote
2answers
36 views

Histone Deacetylase Inhibition

So I am trying to brush up on my knowledge of HATs and HDACs. I am reading the just the 1st paragraph of the background of this study I remember learning that HATs turn things on on, and HDACs turn ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

Mapping of genes: are genes for physically close things close to each other?

I am not sure how to google this but the question is pretty simple: would the genes for the index finger be located "near" the genes for the thumb? Would all genes concerned with the heart be ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Cloning using pET28a and Protein Expression in DH5alpha and BL21

Can someone please direct me to an e-resource or a book that will help a newbie like me learn in depth about Cloning using pET28a and Protein Expression in DH5alpha and BL21. Though I have done ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Can DNA be used directly to determine the age of a mutation?

I've studied that proteins found in a sample as biochemical evidences for evolution. Its variation in structure and configuration can be used to date the age when that mutation occured, effectively ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Questions regarding serial passage of virus through animals arising from the paper The proximal origin of SARS-CoV-2

In this answer on bioinformatics.stackexchange.com to the question inquiring about the validity of the paper Kristian G. Andersen et al, The proximal origin of SARS-CoV-2, the author asserts the ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

How do we know that the “original animal exposure event” of a human to the Covid-19 virus occurred between October and December 2019?

In a Yale med page (interview) on Covid-19 from January it is said that The molecular dating of the virus genomes indicates that the original animal exposure event happened sometime between late ...

1
2 3 4 5
12