Questions tagged [muscles]

The contractile tissue of animals derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells.

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If electrical muscle stimulation activates muscles the same way a brain does, why doesn't it result in the same muscle mass increase?

I've been reading about Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS), (also known as neuromuscular electrical stimulation or electromyostimulation). All resources stress that the electrical signals used by EMS ...
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What is the relationship between muscle energy consumption, the period over which the contraction occurs and the mechanical work performed?

I'm asking this question with some basic knowledge of physics and general fitness. Suppose you are lifting a still object with mass $m$ from height $h_1$ to height $h_2$ with an arbitrary (straight or ...
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What are the roles of ATP and ADP in muscle contraction?

I've always known that the hydrolysis of ATP generates ADP, P, and energy, so I'd assume that if energy is necessary in a given process, ATP hydrolysis should occur (or another exothermic process). ...
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How do smooth muscles function without myoglobin?

Myoglobin serves important function of Oxygen storage in Skeletal and Cardiac muscles. However, It is absent in smooth muscles. Why is it absent in smooth muscles? Why smooth muscles don't need ...
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Is there a difference in flying technique or anatomy between birds and bats which means bats don't need a large sternum?

I know that birds have a large sternum in order to anchor the wing muscles. Bats also have wings, but don't have the same large sternum. Is there a difference in either flying technique or anatomy ...
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What is seperating one muscle from another in body?

I have been learning about gross anatomy and have been watching a lot of dissection videos online and this question has me a bit confused. I know that the human body have about 600 muscles. I know the ...
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Why doesn't muscle strength depend on its length?

In case of tug of war the more people participate the more strength they represent. And in case of muscles - the longer it is, the greater the number of myosin heads bind to actin when muscles ...
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Why does bicep activate during dead hang?

Hanging from a bar causes my bicep to feel much harder than when simply holding my arm straight above my head relaxed, without a bar. This was slightly surprising to me: I used to assume that since ...
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Is protein intake required for the formation of new myosatellite cells?

Hypertrophy of muscle fibers requires an adequate (significant, really) intake of protein, but what about just forming new myosatellite cells as a response to a stress applied to the muscle? Does that ...
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176 views

Do animal muscles atrophy slower than humans?

Suppose I consider the silver back gorilla as an example. I cannot imagine ever seeing one in the wild intentionally doing something akin to weightlifting like humans solely for the purpose of ...
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Most optically transparent muscle phantom?

I am trying to use Schlieren imaging techniques to visualize how a sound wave propagates through muscle tissue. In the past, when needing to experiment with muscle we would use an agar based muscle ...
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Does alcohol really helps to get substances get faster into the bloodstream? [closed]

I saw the video where Arnold Schwarzenegger cooks some protein cocktail and adds Austrian Schnapps to the mix, saying that it's to make everything get faster to the blood. Is it true or some kind of a ...
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Getting confused by neutralizer, fixator and stabilizer muscles

I know that neutralizers may also be classified as stabilizers because it is their ability to keep joints balanced that holds motion along a specific path. A fixator muscle is a stabilizer that acts ...
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What mammals can rotate and move their ears the most?

I found out that rabbits can rotate their ears 270 degrees, and also move them up, down and independently. Are there any other mammals that can control their ears' position that well, or even better?
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What does the term 'glycogen mobilisation' mean?

I read that glycogen is a mobilised store of glucose: Glycogen is a readily mobilized storage form of glucose. It is a very large, branched polymer of glucose residues (Figure 21.1) that can be ...
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Does Krebs cycle occur in fast glycolytic muscle fibres?

They have mitochondria. So they can have aerobic respiration. (?) Does Krebs cycle occur in their mitochondria?
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Why Can't Muscles Push When They Return To Their Original Length?

I understand that muscles can only contract and shorten and thus can only pull, but why can't a muscle push when it relaxes and returns to its initial length?
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What stops myosin during muscle relaxation?

I understand that when the muscle is relaxed tropomyosin blocks myosin binding sites on actin filaments thereby preventing muscle contraction. What I am concerned with however, is whether myosin ...
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Does ATP production increase with oxygen availability?

I'm not a biologist so pardon any ignorance on my part. I'm working on a speculative evolution project and I'm looking to understand how the partial pressure of oxygen effects the maximum aerobic ...
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Biological Neural Network Training for Babies [closed]

I am concerned by the fact that babies cant walk because the muscles in their limbs arent developed and tuned to give directional control, it takes years before babies gain mobility and dexterity. So ...
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What is the difference between a myofibril and a myoblast? (In skeletal muscle)

I read that a muscle fibre (myofiber) is formed when myoblasts fuse. https://teaching.ncl.ac.uk/bms/wiki/index.php/Skeletal_muscle#:~:text=The%20multinucleate%20feature%20is%20established%20in%...
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Question on thick filaments

In this photo, I know that the arrows pointing towards the M-line of sarcomere on actin filaments are due to the power strokes of myosin heads. However, what I don't understand are the arrows on the ...
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Summation on muscles

I am learning myology and encountered 2 problems in tetanus and summation: Unfused tetanus is just a continual summation of twitches if I am not mistaken. However, is it a MUST for summation / ...
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what powers power strokes

I am wondering what really powers the myosin head to undergo the power stroke to push the actin filaments towards the M-line. I have 2 thoughts: when ATP in the myosin head gets hydrolyzed, the ...
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What inhibits linkage between actin and myosin filaments

What is the mechanism behind the inhibition for cross-bridge linkage between actin and myosin filaments in the binding-tilting cycle? There are 2 possible ways that are in my mind: a. Tn-I (tropnin-I)...
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Why didn't more muscles evolve the endurance of heart muscle? [closed]

The heart is a muscle capable of both the quick contraction of white muscle cells, and also the endurance of red muscle cells. Why haven't more muscles in the body adapted the same combo of abilities? ...
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Pectoralis muscles as push muscles vs pull muscles

Pectoralis muscles are the adductors, flexors of arm in addition to medial rotators of arm. How does this action translate in to acting as helping in push ups or in bench press? I am having trouble ...
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Suspensory ligaments: why are they ligaments?

Don't ligaments connect bone to bone? In the eye for example, the suspensory ligaments connect the ciliary muscle to the lens, which obviously aren't bones. Is this just one of those instances where ...
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In a skeletal muscle contraction, what happens after ACh binds to the nicotinic iontropic receptors on sarcolemma?

Does the bound ACh becomes unbound and then gets hydrolysed by acetylcholinerase?
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Are “tremors” and “ tetanic contractions” the same thing?

Do these two expressions have the same meaning? 1- Tetanic contractions in the skeletal muscles 2- Rythmic shaking of the hands (These two expressions are supposed to be two symptoms of Parkinson’s ...
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What happens to eyeball when you push your eye muscles harder?

I have myopia and I read that the rays of light intersect before the retina. When I can not see clearly I can push somehow my eye muscles and can see a bit clearly. The object gets clear but moves ...
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Humans best at long distance running: purely physiological or is it a function also of ability to pace?

I have read that although certainly other land animals are much faster over short distances, a human can run down any other animal over time, so that if a human is hunting like a gazelle, etc. ...
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Do people with higher body hair growth (eg. Women with hirutism) need more protein? [closed]

Hair is protein. Does that mean that the body of a woman with hirutism is using more than usual protein to make hair and thus she needs more for building and repairing muscles?
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Why does hypocalcaemia cause increased muscle contraction?

Calcium is needed for muscle contraction, so how does hypocalcaemia cause increased sustained contraction?
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Are changes in flexibility from stretching due to changes in the nerves or the muscles?

For many people, stretching repeatedly over a period of time improves their flexibility. I want to know whether this improvement commonly seen is due to a change in the nerves or the muscle’s material ...
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Why is muscle force more dependent on cross-sectional area than on fiber length?

I was looking up why smaller animals are proportionally stronger than larger animals. The answer that comes back everytime is that muscle force depends on the number of muscle fibers, which is ...
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Do multiple axons innervate a single skeletal muscle fiber?

The typical text-book illustration of innervation of muscle fibers shows branches at a single position along the fiber. Does any given muscle fiber have more axons that innervate it though, given that ...
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Are there any detrimental effects to long term electrical muscle stimulation?

I know that different types of electrical stimulation can be used in fields such as physical therapy to get muscles to contract. However, these electrical stimulation sessions are not prolonged and ...
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Can the human body store protein?

I am interested to know if a human body can store protein. Absolutely for the bodybuilders, does it really matter if they divide their protein consumption during the day or eat all of it in one meal ...
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Why do muscle spindles send impulses at a constant rate when the muscle is at rest?

According to my book, the sensory neuron around the muscle spindle is sending impulses at a constant rate, while the entire muscle itself is relaxated (at rest). So when the muscle stretches the ...
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Are (muscle) satellite cells the same as muscle stem cells?

In terms of muscle: are the terms 'satellite cell' and 'muscle stem cell' interchangeable? That is, are there muscle stem cells that are not satellite cells, or vice versa?
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How does an electrical impulse spread in a muscle fiber spread from the motor end plate?

Does this impulse in skeletal muscle spread much in the same way it does in neurons, with an initial potential change that spreads to its immediate surroundings and is then re-amplified or is it the ...
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Why do red muscle fibres have more mitochondria than white muscle fibre but less ATP than White muscle fibres?

This is a question given in my Anatomy book and I am really confused because logically the substance which have more mitochondria should have more ATP as mitochondria is the power house of cell.But ...
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Why is there a mass limit on biological powered flight?

So, this is a thing I never fully understood. There are a lot of reasons for a flying creature to be limited in mass (though I'm unsure if I'm familiar with all of them), from energy consumption to ...
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Is there a minimum amount a muscle can move? And thus, gaps in our movement?

Lately I've been thinking about something, based on my knowledge my chain of reasoning works like this... When you want to move a muscle your brain sends an electrical nervous impulse along the chain ...
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Why does flicking a finger generate so much more force than extending it quickly?

Flicking a finger (holding it back with e.g. the thumb while building up "pressure" against the thumb, then releasing) is much more powerful than just uncurling the finger quickly. I tried to do the ...
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Partial muscle fibre contraction

I'm being taught that: a muscle fibre spans the entire length of the muscle, from the originating tendon to the inserting tendon. The question is, can a muscle fibre contract only partially? Say, if ...
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Are your finger muscles and tendons interconnected?

Are finger muscles and tendons interconnected? If they are interconnected, then if i exercise one finger will it train the other fingers since they are interconnected and share the same muscles in the ...
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ATP and Muscle Contraction

I have a question regarding how molecular interactions manifest in physical actions - such as hanging from a bar. To the best of my understanding, when it comes to the contraction of muscles, ATP is ...
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What trajectory do action potentials take, from initial visual stimulus all the way to motor function?

Say we see a mosquito, and our brain tells us 'hey that's a mosquito, you should kill it.' Then we move our hands and slap/clap it. The initial visual stimulus is translated to an action potential ...

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