Questions tagged [neuroanatomy]

Study of the anatomy and organization of the nervous system.

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Does brain activity generate heat gradients in the brain?

I'm reading this article on guiding axon growth using temperature gradient, and it mentions that the trajectory of growth of neuron connections can be influenced by temperature gradients as little as ...
Alex Stone's user avatar
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How do duplicate brain regions (ex: left/right amygdaloid body) operate together?

I frequently hear talk about parts of the brain like "Amygdala" or "Hypothalamus", so I looked them up in an app called "essential anatomy". What I see is that there's mirror symmetry, and most of ...
Alex Stone's user avatar
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How does expansion of the skin via mitosis influence the density of its specialised nerve endings

I found a reddit question Do nerves & nerve endings expand with skin or does skin expansion causes loss of nerve density where a user references the study Assessment of Epidermal Nerve Fibers: A ...
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Are the foramina of Magendie and Luschka genuine defects of the ependymal epithelium?

Question: Are the foramen Magendie (or the median aperture) and the two foramina Luschka (or the lateral apertures) genuine defects of the ependymal epithelium? So the ventricular lumen truly ...
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Question About the Physiology of Seizures

Absence seizures usually occur in children between ages 4 to 14 (Hopkins Hospital). Spontaneous remission occurs in 65–70% of patients during adolescence (Medicine Central). My question is what ...
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Spatial distribution of axons connecting distant groups of neurons

It would help me to shape my picture of the brain, if I knew the following: Consider two specified groups of neurons A and B in the brain that are well-located but quite distant from each other (e.g. ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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Development of the commissural fibers

Having a look at the corpus callosum one sees that the axons passing the corpus callosum (the commissural fibers) connect mirror-symmetric counter regions of the cortex (roughly). Is there a model ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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Evolutionary motivation behind number of neurons in DCMMP

I'm studying neuro-anatomy right now and I was surprised to learn that there are only three neurons along the Dorsal Column Medial Lemniscal Pathway (DMLP) which relays mechanical sensations from the ...
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How to choose which animals to study when designing evolutionary neuroscience research project

I am currently writing a reseach project for a scientific initiation and my idea would be a literature review identifying all empirical physiological and anatomical evidence for the presence and ...
Matheus C.'s user avatar
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Clarification for the anatomical terminology of the cerebellum

I've been trying to find descriptions for some of the fissures found on the inferior surface of the cerebellum, and so far the only source I've been able to find that provides an adequate description ...
Dahen's user avatar
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How sharp are the borders between Brodmann areas?

How does the border between two Brodmann areas look like in Nissl stains? How large is the transition zone where one cannot tell to which of the two areas a neuron belongs to? How many neurons are ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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Chief Sensory Cells

What makes the second order neurons of posterior grey horn of spinal cord to be called as "chief" sensory cells? Why don't we call 1st order, or third order neurons or other second order neurones in ...
JM97's user avatar
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Dorsal root fibres

How can dorsal root fibres be unmylinated though are responsible for conduction of pain and temperature? How is their conduction so fast without even being myelinated? Is presence of only one axon( ...
JM97's user avatar
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Real unipolar neurons do indeed exist in human?

I studied that the unipolar neuron in human body are not really unipolar but they're pseoudounipolar neurons. On the other hand according to what I understood from wikipedia (neuron) there are real ...
Alleged Biologist's user avatar
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Biology Experiment Data (Hodgkin-Huxley)

I'm doing research into the Hodgkin-Huxley Model from an electronics/mathematics perspective and I'm looking to find actual numerical results from experiments on squid axons. I want to compare the ...
c_rafter's user avatar
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Biological reason for "deadlift face"?

Always when I deadlift at the maximum load, my face looks more or less like this: or this: The same applies for when I do other heavy-weight exercises. But what biological mechanism causes that? ...
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If blood vessels mostly aren't supplied by parasympathetic nerves, how effects through M3-ACh receptors are mediated?

Blood vessels throughout the body mostly aren't supplied by any parasympathetic fibres. But the effects of ACh through M3-ACh receptors would infact release NO (which acts on VSM and causes ...
ANA negative's user avatar
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Brain centers vs areas (and how they relate to nuclei)

I'm looking for a reputable source that can provide succinct definitions differentiating the following terms in the central nervous system (CNS; particularly in the brain): Area Center Nucleus ...
theforestecologist's user avatar
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Electrical transmission vs Chemical transmission

"The advantage of electrical transmission, apart from speed, is it can favour synchrony in firing. For example, in the brain stem a nucleus called the inferior olive can generate oscillations due to ...
Lia Ahmed's user avatar
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Are there "old" neuron types in the neocortex?

"Old" may mean a neuron type that appeared early in the tree of life, and it may mean – going together – that it comes early in the lineage tree of neuronal cells, rooted in the fertilized ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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Are there nuclei with "real" interneurons?

In Kandel's "Principles of Neural Sciences" in the chapter about the anatomical organization of the brain one reads (p. 323, 4th ed.): »Although a variety of [relay] neurons are involved at each ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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What trajectory do action potentials take, from initial visual stimulus all the way to motor function?

Say we see a mosquito, and our brain tells us 'hey that's a mosquito, you should kill it.' Then we move our hands and slap/clap it. The initial visual stimulus is translated to an action potential ...
chompion's user avatar
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What is the outer boundary of oligodendrocyte myelination?

The sensory and motor neurons comprising the spinal cord and brain stem have the interesting property that different structural components belonging to the same neuron can occupy both the PNS and CNS. ...
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VC06 neuron of c.elegans

My understanding was that all neurons and their synapses of worm c.elegans are already listed. As source of this map I'm using following databases (both should contain same information): ...
pasaba por aqui's user avatar
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An introduction to nuclei in the pons?

I have a couple of questions regarding the nuclei in the pons, thus I figured it would be best to frame the main question in the way that I did. My main question, however, is whether the basal pontine ...
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How are the axons in the white matter bundled?

I wonder if the following question concerning the axons in the white matter does make sense. It is common knowledge that white matter is "composed mainly of bundles of myelinated axons" resp. is "...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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What does synapses hold together?

From three answers to the same question at Quora I've learned of three forces that keep synapses together: They are held together by cell adhesion molecules (e.g. neurexin and neuroligin). They are ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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If we had children wear an apparatus swapping e.g. Red and Blue colors, would their perception adapt?

In the context of neuroscience and philosophy, one difficult question is what makes colors so peculiar and vivid if they're just signals encoding light intensity coming from certain receptors -- an ...
Real's user avatar
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Longest pathway from sensory to motor neurons

How long is the longest pathway a neural signal can take starting from a sensory neuron and ending at a motor neuron (without loops)? [This is a purely theoretical question concerning only the ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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294 views

Does the vagus nerve supply the human thoracic diaphragm?

The vagus nerve (CN X) passes through the oesophageal hiatus of the diaphragm at the vertebral level T10. But does the vagus nerve actually offer any nerve supply to the diaphragm?
D.J. Lawson's user avatar
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Three foramen lying in one vertical plane

In the human skull we can see that 3 foramina named as supraorbital notch(foramen) , infraorbital foramen and mental foramen share a common vertical plane. Is there any surgical significance of for ...
JM97's user avatar
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Why do nerve fibres rotate?

Background: Lemniscus (Latin lēmniscus, ribbon) is a strap of second order nerve fibres which twist as they ascend to the brainstem. Why do these these nerve fibres rotate? What could be the ...
JM97's user avatar
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What is a unitary post synaptic potential?

I am reading the paper Cooperative subnetworks of molecularly similar interneurons in mouse neocortex and have encountered the term: "Unitary (excitatory or inhibitory) post synaptic potential". I ...
user135172's user avatar
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Is the central axon of pseudounipolar neurons in dorsal root ganglia typically myelinated

As I understand, sensory nerve cells in the dorsal root ganglion are pseudounipolar neurons, with a sole protrusion from the soma branching into a central axon (or functional axon) and peripheral axon ...
EpicBroccoli's user avatar
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The first species having circle of Willis (circulus arteriosus cerebri)?

I know mammals are not the only species that have this anatomical unit (i.e. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3982101/). But I was wondering what was the first species that had a similar ...
jacek.ciach's user avatar
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111 views

Where to go next with clustered C elegans neuronal time series

I'm doing some independent research with the C Elegans nervous system (with the OpenWorm project) and was looking for some guidance as to where I should go next. Right now, I'm dealing with calcium ...
theideasmith's user avatar
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22 views

Could there be some safe, hypothetical way of turning on and of thermoregulation?

This is something I thought of with the whole artificial gill concept. Could a modification to the brain/nervous system allow a human to turn off their thermoregulation in air/water of the right ...
Tom's user avatar
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Evolutionary reasoning behind redundancy of CST and RuST

According to my neuro-anatomy class, both the Corsticospinal Tract (CST) and the Rubrospinal Tract (RuST) control upper limb movement. What the evolutionary reasoning behind this redundancy and the ...
Seanny123's user avatar
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How were the synaptic areas identified in the somatic sensation pathways?

I'm studying the somatic sensation pathways in neuro-anatomy and I was wondering what was the experimental procedure for identifying the number and location of the synapses in these pathways? ...
Seanny123's user avatar
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1 answer
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What cell types comprise the median eminence and the tuber cinereum?

I have tried pretty hard to get a detailed description of what exactly the median eminence and the tuber cinereum are but to no avail. I am very familiar with their anatomical relationships (spatially)...
S.C.'s user avatar
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Proportion of cell layers in the different areas of human cortex

I am looking for any scientific paper or book which could help me find the different proportion of layers across the different areas of the human cortex. I am working on a research project which ...
Matheus C.'s user avatar
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29 views

How can nerves slide without tearing

While reading about an exercise called nerve glides I learned that nerves are quite inelastic. With all the nerve branches and relatively straight path how do nerves slide back and forth without ...
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Medical Physiology

I've come across the topic of the influence of inhaled ammonia (caustic ammonia) on breathing rate and some cardiovascular changes. All of this stuff is thought to be mediated through the fifth ...
Alexandr_Kabanets's user avatar
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What is the difference in the function of tractus rubrospinalis and tractus corticospinalis?

What is the difference in the function of tractus corticospinalis and tractus rubrospinalis? I know, that they begin in different parts of the brain, but from what have I read on the internet*, I can'...
doc. Chocholoušek's user avatar
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Any volumetric data for areas of the brain?

I was trying to write an overview of AI and wanted to quantify some numerical data about the brain. It is easy to find many sources quoting 100 billion neurons. However, I would like to get the ...
Dov's user avatar
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Distribution of the number of synapses per neuron

There is a mean number of synapses per neuron in the human brain which is not very well known, but is of order 10,000. (Some say, it's about 6,000, other say it's about 50,000.) What is known about ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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283 views

How many synapses are there in the different target regions of a typical cortical pyramidal cell?

I found the following pictures of axon trees: source source (axons are red) but didn't find a concise answer to the following question: How many (in relative terms) branches terminate and how ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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How many end segments does the axon of a typical cortical pyramidal cell have?

I tried to do some research - starting with a Google search for "typical axonal trees" - and found the following pictures: source source (axons are red) but didn't find a concise answer to this and ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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205 views

Evolutionary advantages of gyri

Sulci and gyri are complementary views on the very same brain-anatomical phenomenon (Note that there is the named concept of gyrification, but not of sulcification, but it's the very same process.) ...
Hans-Peter Stricker's user avatar
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Does the Spinoreticular Tract end in Brainstem?

According to this book on Springer spinoreticular tract is : As the name implies, the tract originates in the spinal cord and terminates in the reticular formation (RF) in the brainstem. While most ...
JM97's user avatar
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