Questions tagged [neurology]

The medical specialty involving the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of disease involving the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
17 views

How does the presynaptic terminal stay at the postsynaptic neuron? [duplicate]

I wondered about this because the two neurons never actually touch. The synaptic cleft is very small, but if there is no connection the neurons might easily separate... [in chemical synapses]
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Direction of impulse at Axo-axonic synapse and dendro-dendritic synapses

Do axo-axonic and dendro-dendritic synapses show some different impulse conduction directions than the usual dendritic (of carrying impulse towards cyton) and axonal nature (of carrying impulse away ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

How are thoughts biologicaly generated?

I want to know how thoughts are biologicaly generated. I know that electrical impulses can trigger formed memories in the brain but what I want to know is how the electrical impulse is generated in ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Why exactly does UMN lesion cause hypertonia?

The corticospinal tracts are excitatory in nature (Glutaminergic). So damage of the CST would mean less excitatory input to the LMN. By this logic, there should not be hypertonia. What is the ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

The Relationship between Copper and Alzheimer's Disease

I've been reading up about the research concerning the etiological factors behind Alzheimer's and I came across two papers - "Studies on Copper induced stability changes in DNA fragment (GCA ATC ...
2
votes
0answers
26 views

Can Inositol triphosphate (IP3)-mediated Calcium release on its own cause membrane depolarization?

This is about smooth muscles. I know that the Voltage-operated Ca²+ channels on the smooth muscle membrane can be opened by membrane depolarization to threshold. I also know that this depolarization ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Bundle of His and Atrioventricular Bundle difference

I see most definition using Bundle of His and AV bundle interchangeable including the wikipedia when you do a Google search for AV bundle But my text book treats as two different things. The action ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Why does the intelligence of an animal correlate with the brain to body mass ratio more closely than to the mass of the brain itself?

It seems counterintuitive that a large animal with a large brain is likely to be less intelligent than a small animal with a medium size brain. It would make more sense if the intelligence of the ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

How does the brain initiate the process of releasing the neurotransmitters?

Just reading up on the basics of neuroscience. Had a basic question on the signal generation. I understand the concepts of sodium, potassium pumps and how the action potential travels through the axon ...
4
votes
1answer
54 views

Can potassium ions depolarise neuron membranes?

I am reading a journal paper about the cell adhesion molecule NCAM2 and I have come across the following statement: To confirm the functionality of the reporters, neurons were time-lapse recorded ...
0
votes
3answers
270 views

If due to some reasons a small portion of our neurons die, how does our body remake them?

There are various reasons such as intake of neurotoxins, and possibly traumatic injuries, that can cause neurons to die. After several hundreds, or thousands of our neurons die, how does our body ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

What are kinesiological factors? [duplicate]

I am in search of a term that describes movement, or practice of motor skills, as a factor of laterality. Would "kinesiological" be appropriate? I'll leave my two previous questions down ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

When and Why does G0 phase occur?

I've asked this question, specifically because i've seen this question. As we see in this diagram , G0 phase occurs after M phase and at a specific point within G1 phase. Is there a meaning to ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Is there such a thing as transcranial magnetic inhibition? inhibit regions of the brain?

is there such a thing as transcranial magnetic inhibition? There is an instrument capable of inhibiting regions of the brain as does transcranial magnetic stimulation, but in reverse? By inhibiting, I ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

What type of factor is practice of motor skills?

I recently asked a question about the cause of motor laterality: What causes motor laterality/ side dominance? I understand that there can be genetic factors, epigenetic factors, or environmental ...
2
votes
1answer
19 views

Does the corpus callosum have a significant relationship with motor memories/ muscle memories?

With the corpus callosum located in the cerebrum, and motor memories having a closer relationship to the cerebellum (which I'm not quite sure about), is there a significant relationship between the ...
4
votes
0answers
37 views

What causes motor laterality/ side dominance?

I would like to understand what leads up to motor laterality, or side dominance of motor skills. I made this assumption that it depends on neuroplasticity and the side in which one first learns the ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Myelination of 1st Order Neurons in Spinal Cord Ascending Tracts

When a 1st order sensory neuron enters the Dorsal Column Ascending Pathway (i.e. Spinal Cord), does it get its myelination from Oligodendrocytes (as inside CNS) or it retains Schwann Cell myelination?
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Is grip force a reflex?

When we reach for an object, for example, a cup, is the force used to hold it a reflex? Which sensorial information is used to select the force to hold it? Why I am interested in this question With ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Are “tremors” and “ tetanic contractions” the same thing?

Do these two expressions have the same meaning? 1- Tetanic contractions in the skeletal muscles 2- Rythmic shaking of the hands (These two expressions are supposed to be two symptoms of Parkinson’s ...
-2
votes
1answer
36 views

Alternative hypothesis for learning in brain beyond the hebbian rule

I was reading on wikipedia that there are exceptions to the hebbian rule, and I was curious about the possibilities of other hypotheses of how learning occur in the brain. So I would like to know: ...
5
votes
2answers
74 views

How do anticholinesterase pesticides kill nematodes?

Compounds that inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase are commonly used as pesticides. In animals with centralized respiratory systems controlled by the nervous system, poisoning with an ...
-2
votes
3answers
98 views

If the Brain can store as much information as a billion hard disks why cant i memorize a single word document of random letters?

I read a lot of articles on this and all seem to agree that the brain storage in neural connections is tremendous but that doesnt explain why we forget things so easily and have such a modest memory ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Is downregulation of neurological receptors fully reversible, i.e. complete upregulation and resensitization?

Are down/upregulation truly reciprocal mechanisms? After a binding ligand or agonist is removed, such as a prescription medication, is upregulation and resensitization able to occur to a level that ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

static versus dynamic equilibrium when bending over

When a person stoops/bends over, is the equilibrium functioning static equilibrium or dynamic equilibrium? I am not sure, because on the one hand the person is not moving (static), however, his/her ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Can a brain be damaged by overstimulation?

I am wondering what, if any, long term health effects there are from high levels of brain activity. I don't mean cases where a brain is being artificially stimulated, but rather where there is a high ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

How does an electrical impulse spread in a muscle fiber spread from the motor end plate?

Does this impulse in skeletal muscle spread much in the same way it does in neurons, with an initial potential change that spreads to its immediate surroundings and is then re-amplified or is it the ...
2
votes
1answer
421 views

What causes sodium channels to open?

What triggers the opening of sodium channels in a neuronal membrane? Is it acetylcholine that activates sodium channels in the postsynaptic membrane? Are sodium channels like receptors that have to ...
3
votes
2answers
64 views

Speed of electric signal vs chemical diffusion

I'm currently reading the book, "An Introduction to Nervous Systems" by Ralph J. Greenspan. On page 20, there is a sentence that confused me. It was, "Electrical signaling has the advantage of being ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

What differentiates neurons in different parts of the brain?

For example: what makes a neuron in the hippocampus of the brain different from a neuron in, say, the amygdala, or the frontal lobe, or anywhere else in the brain? Do neurons in different parts of the ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Does loss of dopaminergic neurons totally eliminate voluntary muscular control?

Breathing is a function that is not only autonomic, but can also be temporarily overridden and placed under voluntary control. In fact, you are now breathing manually. Now, suppose that someone has ...
2
votes
2answers
267 views

How do organophosphates actually work?

The common explanation as to what the primary mechanism of action for organophosphates (and carbamates) is is the inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase and resulting buildup of acetylcholine ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

What substances can selectively destroy certain cells?

Recently, I've watched a documentary about how, in the 1980s, people were buying and using drugs from the streets and then becoming paralyzed a few days afterwards. The drugs that they were using were ...
5
votes
0answers
51 views

What phosphorylates tau protein & and what causes tau to be phosphorylated?

I want to know what phosphorylates tau protein and its 6 isoforms. I know kinases cause phosphorylation events, and in tau it can be phosphorylated in a healthy neuron in the trans conformation, but ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Can motor neurons in the brain stem start movements?

Supposedly (consciouss) movement is started in the cerebral cortex. But some time ago I've read a research which stated it might be possible some movements (not specified which ones, probably mean ...
1
vote
0answers
54 views

Do non-human primates have mental disorders like humans?

I was at the zoo today and watched a gorilla pick at a scab on its finger, compulsively, until it started bleeding. Is this OCD or is it just a nervous thing that non-human primates do at the zoo? Do ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Are there toxins that cause heart attack and/or stroke in multiple individuals in short time frames?

Are there any known environmental factors that would cause more than one person to have a heart attack or stroke within a short period of time (e.g. 2-3 months) of one another? I'm particularly ...
2
votes
1answer
162 views

Can cerebrospinal fluid pass through the pia mater or ependymal cells of the ventricles?

During a lecture, a professor commented that the cerebrospinal fluid and interstitial fluid of the brain parenchyma have similar composition because they can exchange with one another. This struck me ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Can nervous disorders be cured? Will enough research be the answer? [closed]

I have searched every nook of the internet and I couldn't find a clear and to-the-point answer. Well my story is that I am a young BSc student who wants to do research on neurological conditions ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Neurons and nerves [duplicate]

What is a nerve compared to a neuron? Is it a collection of axons alone or does it include cell body too? I'm pretty confused of what actually the "nerve" is composed of. I had imagined that the nerve ...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

Why biologic systems tends to become more complex?

From elements, chemical compounds, cells, multicellular organisms, society evolves and with each step possibilities increase and things get complex. We are builing structures like ribosome builds ...
1
vote
1answer
350 views

Can upper motor neuron lesions cause hypotonia?

I have been taught that hypotonia is always caused by lower motor neuron lesions while hypertonia is by upper motor neuron lesions. However, I recently learned of an entity called central hypotonia, ...
1
vote
1answer
907 views

Rod and cone photoreceptors are neurons?

i mean the photoreceptors have axon and dendrite and body cell or it is not neuron any more . can we say outer segment of photoreceptor cell is dendrite ? of course these have body cells but i am ...
6
votes
1answer
276 views

Why Is Gray Matter Gray?

When I researched I found different reason for this, the popular ones are 1) white matter is mylinated .this reason was given in reference books and this website while others say 2)cell body ...
3
votes
1answer
50 views

Flow diversion for cerebral aneurysms or stabilizing the hemodynamics?

I'm doing research of flow diverter for cerebral aneurysms applications and I'm wondering the reason behind stent placement underneath of cerebral aneurysms is to divert the flow or stabilize the ...
3
votes
0answers
75 views

What is the signal that indicates which neurons Schwann cells should myelinate versus which should remain unmyelinated?

Schwann cells are neuroglial cells that produce myelin in the peripheral nervous system. However, not all axons are myelinated - some will remain unmyelinated. There must be some signal that ...
1
vote
0answers
98 views

Why Cerebrospinal fluid is not heated for VDRL?

For performing VDRL of serum , we heat serum to inactivate complement proteins which may otherwise interfere , but why don't we do same for CSF even though it too has complement proteins in it? Is it ...
3
votes
1answer
79 views

Why there is no neurovascular drug-eluting stent?

I'm researching on neurovascular stents and I'm wondering why there is not much about drug-eluting neurovascular flow diverters in the literature? I read in an article that it's because of complex ...
5
votes
2answers
662 views

Neuron connectivity- how are they connected physically

If Neurons are only connected through synapse and there is no physical connection, how are they just suspended in brain layers?
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Are there humans which the brain sends signals to the limbs faster than the average?

I have done some researches on the time taken by the brain to send signals, but I didn't find whether that time is the same amongst all humans or there are some differences, and I have based my ...