Questions tagged [neurology]

The medical specialty involving the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of disease involving the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
15 views

What is the effect of lesion of dorsal nerve root?

Dorsal nerve root or dorsal horn of the spinal cord is sensory in nature. The primary afferent neuron or secondary afferent neuron ascend via the dorsal horn of the spinal cord to form the reflex arc ...
3
votes
1answer
51 views

What differentiates neurons in different parts of the brain?

For example: what makes a neuron in the hippocampus of the brain different from a neuron in, say, the amygdala, or the frontal lobe, or anywhere else in the brain? Do neurons in different parts of the ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Does loss of dopaminergic neurons totally eliminate voluntary muscular control?

Breathing is a function that is not only autonomic, but can also be temporarily overridden and placed under voluntary control. In fact, you are now breathing manually. Now, suppose that someone has ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

How much is the motion speed of calcium ions in ion channels and neurons?

As far as I know, calcium ions moving in a Brownian manner are responsible for the performance of neurons and neuro-transmitters. My question is, how much kinetic energy these calcium ions have and ...
2
votes
2answers
215 views

How do organophosphates actually work?

The common explanation as to what the primary mechanism of action for organophosphates (and carbamates) is is the inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase and resulting buildup of acetylcholine ...
1
vote
0answers
40 views

What substances can selectively destroy certain cells?

Recently, I've watched a documentary about how, in the 1980s, people were buying and using drugs from the streets and then becoming paralyzed a few days afterwards. The drugs that they were using were ...
4
votes
0answers
28 views

What phosphorylates tau protein & and what causes tau to be phosphorylated?

I want to know what phosphorylates tau protein and its 6 isoforms. I know kinases cause phosphorylation events, and in tau it can be phosphorylated in a healthy neuron in the trans conformation, but ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Can motor neurons in the brain stem start movements?

Supposedly (consciouss) movement is started in the cerebral cortex. But some time ago I've read a research which stated it might be possible some movements (not specified which ones, probably mean ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

Do non-human primates have mental disorders like humans?

I was at the zoo today and watched a gorilla pick at a scab on its finger, compulsively, until it started bleeding. Is this OCD or is it just a nervous thing that non-human primates do at the zoo? Do ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Are there toxins that cause heart attack and/or stroke in multiple individuals in short time frames?

Are there any known environmental factors that would cause more than one person to have a heart attack or stroke within a short period of time (e.g. 2-3 months) of one another? I'm particularly ...
2
votes
1answer
131 views

Can cerebrospinal fluid pass through the pia mater or ependymal cells of the ventricles?

During a lecture, a professor commented that the cerebrospinal fluid and interstitial fluid of the brain parenchyma have similar composition because they can exchange with one another. This struck me ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Can nervous disorders be cured? Will enough research be the answer? [closed]

I have searched every nook of the internet and I couldn't find a clear and to-the-point answer. Well my story is that I am a young BSc student who wants to do research on neurological conditions ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Neurons and nerves [duplicate]

What is a nerve compared to a neuron? Is it a collection of axons alone or does it include cell body too? I'm pretty confused of what actually the "nerve" is composed of. I had imagined that the nerve ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

Is there still a convincing argument/evidence that adult neurogenesis does not exist/play an essential role in NON-Human Primates?

Adult neurogenesis in human-being is a debated topic, and will probably take several years to get resolved. I am under impression that it is relatively easier to settle the debate on non-human ...
-1
votes
2answers
92 views

Why biologic systems tends to become more complex?

From elements, chemical compounds, cells, multicellular organisms, society evolves and with each step possibilities increase and things get complex. We are builing structures like ribosome builds ...
0
votes
1answer
164 views

Can upper motor neuron lesions cause hypotonia?

I have been taught that hypotonia is always caused by lower motor neuron lesions while hypertonia is by upper motor neuron lesions. However, I recently learned of an entity called central hypotonia, ...
0
votes
1answer
242 views

Rod and cone photoreceptors are neurons?

i mean the photoreceptors have axon and dendrite and body cell or it is not neuron any more . can we say outer segment of photoreceptor cell is dendrite ? of course these have body cells but i am ...
6
votes
1answer
158 views

Why Is Gray Matter Gray?

When I researched I found different reason for this, the popular ones are 1) white matter is mylinated .this reason was given in reference books and this website while others say 2)cell body ...
3
votes
1answer
41 views

Flow diversion for cerebral aneurysms or stabilizing the hemodynamics?

I'm doing research of flow diverter for cerebral aneurysms applications and I'm wondering the reason behind stent placement underneath of cerebral aneurysms is to divert the flow or stabilize the ...
3
votes
0answers
55 views

What is the signal that indicates which neurons Schwann cells should myelinate versus which should remain unmyelinated?

Schwann cells are neuroglial cells that produce myelin in the peripheral nervous system. However, not all axons are myelinated - some will remain unmyelinated. There must be some signal that ...
1
vote
0answers
79 views

Why Cerebrospinal fluid is not heated for VDRL?

For performing VDRL of serum , we heat serum to inactivate complement proteins which may otherwise interfere , but why don't we do same for CSF even though it too has complement proteins in it? Is it ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

Why there is no neurovascular drug-eluting stent?

I'm researching on neurovascular stents and I'm wondering why there is not much about drug-eluting neurovascular flow diverters in the literature? I read in an article that it's because of complex ...
5
votes
2answers
628 views

Neuron connectivity- how are they connected physically

If Neurons are only connected through synapse and there is no physical connection, how are they just suspended in brain layers?
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Are there humans which the brain sends signals to the limbs faster than the average?

I have done some researches on the time taken by the brain to send signals, but I didn't find whether that time is the same amongst all humans or there are some differences, and I have based my ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Is it possible to directly uploaded controlled imagery into a person's conscience?

I was wondering, is it possible to use electrical charges and/or EM waves to induce imagery directly into a person's mind? I got this idea because since almost everybody dreams, and dreams are ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

is it possible to use electroshock to temporary stop gross motor functions directly on the neural pathway?

Is it possible to modify that procedure and use it to send a small electroshock on the specific neural pathway and temporarily stop that gross motor function? When the microphone detects unwanted ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

How do our eyes see an inverted image? [duplicate]

How exactly do our eyes see an inverted image of what we are looking at? Does it have something to do with the shape of our lens (i.e. convex)?
3
votes
1answer
120 views

What parts of the visual system could be responsible for a fixed, monocular scotoma?

Light enters the cornea, crosses the lens, hits the retina. Electric sinal travels from retina through the optic nerve, reaches the chiasma, crosses and makes its way to the visual cortex. My ...
-2
votes
1answer
33 views

Can we send signals to nerve?

I want to know two things. Can we send a signal to a nerve using external source like electricity? Can we differentiate signals sent from receptors like pain receptors, pressure receptors etc.
2
votes
1answer
67 views

What are ECT parameters?

ECT or shock treatment is used to treat psychological disorders. How much voltage, current and duration is used for this? Wikipedia mentions a treatment of 0.8 Ampere for 5 seconds.
6
votes
1answer
90 views

Are there any known rules that neurons always follow while transmitting/receiving signals?

I'm new to neurobiology so I don't know much about it. However, I have worked on artificial neural networks. Man-made AI networks all follow a handful of simple rules. I was wondering if biological ...
1
vote
2answers
9k views

difference between neurotransmitters and hormones

I have been reading a lot about neurotransmitters and hormones but what's the difference between them both or are they the same? It's been confusing for a while now. Also, why do some ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

What happens to the brain during meditation?

I've read several experiments on the internet according to which it is possible to reach a psychedelic state without taking any psychedelic drugs like DMT, LSD and other tryptamine derivatives. It ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Confusion about the construction of the rat's mental map

I'm reading the article "A Topological Paradigm for Hippocampal Spatial Map Formation Using Persistent Homology" by Y. Dabaghian, F. Mémoli, L. Frank, G. Carlsson I try to understand the following ...
3
votes
0answers
45 views

Question About the Physiology of Seizures

Absence seizures usually occur in children between ages 4 to 14 (Hopkins Hospital). Spontaneous remission occurs in 65–70% of patients during adolescence (Medicine Central). My question is what ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Why aren't the brains of most advanced life forms in the middle of their bodies? [closed]

This question is designed to be the successor to Why don't most animals have "heads" in the middle of their bodies? The previous question was flawed as it fails to accurately define ...
8
votes
1answer
287 views

Why do neurons loose the potential to regenerate and reproduce in adult animals?

I have read in several books that neurons in the central nervous system loose the power to regenerate after some developmental stage but why do they? Can we artificially induce regeneration?
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Implanted neural recording system vs Electroencephalography

Can someone help me to understand why in nowadays the scientists develop implanted neural recording system to measure and collect neural signals? Why the use of the electroencephalogram is not ...
3
votes
0answers
276 views

How long can one go with necrosis?

In general, when a limb dies, how long does it take before it falls off? Can you go years with a black and useless limb, or does it just.. fall off right away?
1
vote
1answer
138 views

If action potential is “all or nothing” then how are finely tuned signals sent from one neuron to another?

If the action potential is an "all or nothing" phenomenon, then how is one type of neurotransmitter secreted rather than another? Let's say, for example, if a neuron received an excitatory post ...
3
votes
1answer
97 views

Names for effects of sleep deprivation on the brain & body

When staying awake for a long period (3 or 4 days), some weird phenomena can occur. In my experience, it was always triggered by thinking too deeply and has in other occasions too. Do these things ...
5
votes
1answer
504 views

What is synaptic bias?

In non linear model of a neuron there was a mention about bias (Bₖ) which was the summation of the synaptic weights. I want to understand what synaptic bias is and their application/use in neuronal ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Neurons competing for survival

I was reading in a book that in the process of neurogenesis - when new neurons are born - neurons compete for survival. Or in other words they have to make themselves useful to the brain otherwise ...
1
vote
2answers
899 views

Is it possible to temporarily paralyze someone through the use of electric signals or focused ultrasound?

I've been reading about how it is possible to send signals to the brain using focused ultrasound or electrical impulses. It is possible to make someone see a certain shape or color by stimulating ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

Why is it that I can understand speech through one ear better than the other ear?

First, I do a lot of music so I'm used to pick up details in sound and I have had hearing tests showing that my ears are quite well balanced, for my age, without any dead spots. When I am in a social ...
4
votes
0answers
240 views

Would methamphetamine heal wounds, infections, and diseases?

Alright, so this sounds crazy but based on these research findings it is safe to assume that meth would allow wounds and diseases to heal faster by interleukin 6 . On the otherhand, using meth during ...
0
votes
0answers
212 views

Does the Spinoreticular Tract end in Brainstem?

According to this book on Springer spinoreticular tract is : As the name implies, the tract originates in the spinal cord and terminates in the reticular formation (RF) in the brainstem. While most ...
4
votes
1answer
189 views

Why don't neurons die during a stent procedure in the brain?

Stents are used to provide scaffolding to the blood vessels. When they are used in arteries or arterioles in brain, won't neurons die because of lack of oxygen during procedure?
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Why do nerve fibres rotate?

Background: Lemniscus (Latin lēmniscus, ribbon) is a strap of second order nerve fibres which twist as they ascend to the brainstem. Why do these these nerve fibres rotate? What could be the ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

What is two photon calcium imaging?

I have encountered the term "two photon calcium imaging" in a few papers. I have tried to look in the internet but can't understand what this technique actually is. I will be very happy for ...