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Questions tagged [neurology]

The medical specialty involving the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of disease involving the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle.

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Why can't dopamine cross the blood brain barrier but l-dopa can?

Levodopa can cross the BBB and is less lipid soluble then dopamine, so dopamine should be able to cross the BBB more easily then l-dopa, but for some reason dopamine cant cross the BBB. Both dl-...
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1answer
925 views

Why a brain's hemisphere controls the opposite side of the body? [duplicate]

As a physics student with very little understanding of biology, in a course about physics foundations diagnostic techniques I have come up with this question. I don't even know if it does make sense ...
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85 views

What is the current consensus on the Loveheim Cube of Emotion [closed]

I recently encountered the Lovheim Cube of Emotion. I was wondering what level of supporting research there is to go with it and whether or not there is a concensus at this stage. If I'm perfectly ...
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2answers
848 views

Why does our face get red during anger?

My attempt: This site says that it is due to flight or fight mechanism, which results in more amount of blood being passed to face causing red face. But isn't it wasteful for our body to send more ...
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1answer
761 views

Small vs Large neurons

What is the criteria for classifying neurons as small and large? Is this classification based on gross size or the length of axon? Do they have any physiological difference? For instance it is said ...
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0answers
51 views

Why do palpitations happen when someone is nearing something rewarding? [closed]

When you are nearing something rewarding (IE: winning a prize, or winning a game), why do you experience tachycardia? For example, if someone entered a raffle with the number 9284938, and the ...
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1answer
902 views

How does methamphetamine (meth) damage neurons?

Meth is considered to be neurotoxic by forming reactive oxygen species and oxidizing the neurons. But unlike dopamine, which, by the way, is neurotoxic due to ROS induced dopaminergic stress, meth ...
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1answer
333 views

How spinal cord play its roles in human beings sex? [closed]

I know most people can't enjoy sex if their spinal cord injured. How spinal cord play its roles in human beings sex?
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108 views

Why do myelinated axons conduct impulses faster? [duplicate]

How does the myelination help in better conduction? I would prefer answers that are not too technical please.
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2answers
801 views

What is the specific role of the cerebellum when it comes to 'coordinating movement'?

In elementary biology (high school level in the UK - A levels), we are told that the cerebellum is the part of the brain that 'coordinates movement'. Literally nobody takes the time to explain what ...
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0answers
91 views

Loss of nerves in asthma

This site says: VIP [vasoactive intestinal peptide] nerves are absent in severely asthmatic subjects. Mice with targeted deletion of the VIP gene exhibit histopathologic features of airway ...
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1answer
39 views

Why do polyneuropathies affect the extremities first?

Polyneuropathy is an anatomic pattern of nerve damage most commonly seen in Diabetes mellitus. To quote Robbin's Pathology, In most polyneuropathies, axons are affected in a length dependent ...
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1answer
467 views

Indirect pathway of movement and Parkinson's?

So Parkinson's disease leads to the loss of dopaminergic neurons. I understand how the direct pathway (an excitatory pathway) is inhibited, leading to a loss of movement. However, how can the loss of ...
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1answer
60 views

Why can nervous inflammation radiate symmetrically in the limbs?

I have had carpal tunnel syndrome in my hands this week, when the nerve in the pith of your palm, through thumb and index, is pinched, and swells, inside the wrist ligament tunnel. In a few days, ...
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0answers
360 views

High frequency tone/ringing in movies/music and its effects [closed]

I was watching a horror movie and I noticed during a scene that there was a high pitched noise playing in the background. It had been playing for a while before I noticed it and when I took notice it ...
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1answer
414 views

What is a starter cell?

I am reading the paper Cooperative Subnetworks of Molecularly Similar Interneurons in Mouse Neocortex and a term "starter cell" apears there (page 6): This yielded tissue sections where SOM or ...
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1answer
66 views

Does the effect of light on melatonin release adapts to light level over long periods of time?

Or do you go to bed with low levels of melatonin when you stay behind a computer screen all day?
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40 views

Dorsal root fibres

How can dorsal root fibres be unmylinated though are responsible for conduction of pain and temperature? How is their conduction so fast without even being myelinated? Is presence of only one axon( ...
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1answer
700 views

What are different firing rates in different regions in the human brain?

Could it for example be that neurons that are concerned with high-order thought and medium-term planning fire more slowly, or is it expected that all neurons rather fire more or less at the same rate? ...
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1answer
164 views

Can neurons divide if somehow centrioles are introduced in nerve cells?

I am a biology student, so i know that centrioles are required for cell division, and i also know that nerve cells lack centrioles. My question is that if somehow compatible centrioles were ...
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1answer
272 views

How does stimulus reach neural threshold?

I understand that when the stimulus into a neuron is greater than the threshold it triggers the action potential. Do all the contributing stimulus have to occur at the same time, or can they occur ...
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1answer
102 views

Minimal viable EEG equipment for dissertation research on BCI / BMI

I am planning out a dissertation study of Brain-computer Interface (a.k.a. Brain-machine Interface, BCI, BMI, etc) applications. One of the 3 papers in that dissertation will involve collecting ...
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0answers
230 views

FitzHugh–Nagumo system with diffusion

I was studying the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with diffusion and I quite do not understand the meaning of it. If we consider the system without diffusion, \begin{equation}\label{FHN}\begin{cases} \dot{u}=...
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2answers
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What is the cause that angina pectoris is felt in your left arm?

When someone has heart problems sometimes they feel pain in their left arm. But why is the left arm painful?
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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on science fair [closed]

My friends and I would love to make a TMS machine and apply it to make famous "god helmet". We know that magnetic stimulation may cause visions of angels, gods etc. My question is: what are the ...
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2answers
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What causes the range of severity of neurological deficits in Down's syndrome?

It's known that the severity of symptoms caused by a trisomy 21 varies from individual to individual. Part of the explanation for this range of severity is the finding that 94% of Down's syndrome ...
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1answer
72 views

What other cognitive behaviors in bees, outside of navigation, are affect by neonicotinoids

It is conclusive that neonicotinoids alter navigation in bees when locating food sources. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0091364 But if so, shouldn't cognition also ...
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1answer
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Synaptic pruning and selective elimination during adolescence

How does Synaptic pruning occur during pre-adolescence, adolescence and post-adolescence, after there is blooming overproduction of synaptic connections until the years of late childhood, and how does ...
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0answers
120 views

How much should one smoke in order to prevent Parkinson's? [closed]

There are studies who claim that nicotine has a neuroprotective effect against Parkinson's(such as this: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11772120) What would be the minimum amount of nicotine(...
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55 views

Of people who develop Alzheimer disease, are those people genetically predisposed to it?

I have read a lot lately about microbiological pathogens that are found in blood vessels in the brain of patient's with Alzheimer disease (positive association). So, I am confused whether there are ...
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0answers
51 views

CNS lymphatic vessels around ventricles lat et 4th?

I am searching for precise locations of the lymphatic vessels of the CNS based on the applications of the article here. However, I did not find any when having a focus on the immediate region around ...
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0answers
162 views

Electrode locations for neuron study in stereo EEG?

I am thinking where to put optimally depth electrodes in stereo EEG outside sulci in studying the functioning of neural transmission of N neurons over one perivascular space in rodents, mice or rat, ...
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0answers
27 views

Is there an evolutionary reason why so many white matter tracts decussate in the brainstem and spinal chord?

From a developmental perspective, I would tend to assume that it would be much simpler for the fibers descending from (for instance) the pyramidal tracts, superior cerebellar peduncles, or ascending ...
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2answers
296 views

Can the spinal cord contain an “epileptic focus”?

I was wondering, is there a possibility of an something similar to an epileptic focus to exist within the spinal cord? Note I am using the terminology "epileptic" loosely here, principally for the ...
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1answer
323 views

What is the role of the tissue surrounding neurons in decision making and taking control of impulses?

How does the fatty tissue surrounding neurons supports and enhances the speed of electrical impulses? How does it stabilize connections that take control of impulses and decision-making? The cells ...
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1answer
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What neuro-motor diseases cause the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to malfunction?

Please note: This question is neither homework nor seeking medical advice. I'm simply asking for a factual, objective, biological explanation of the various neuro-motor diseases/illnesses that can act ...
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1answer
131 views

Can the Hebbian theory apply to Inhibitory Neurons

If I understand the basic Hebbian theory, when a neuron fires a pulse to another neuron and this pulse causes the target neuron to fire then the delta energy sent from the initial neuron to the target ...
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1answer
498 views

Neuroscience of mathematicians

I've tried to google this but everything that comes up are things like "mathematical neuroscience" rather than the other way around. Specifically, I'm interested in the workings of a mathematician's ...
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4answers
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Is there any way a human could whistle and be unable to speak?

Is there any situation anatomically, where a human could understand the speech of others perfectly, without any capabilities of speech themselves, but would retain the ability to whistle with a tune? ...
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2answers
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Is it possible to process electrical signals from the brain and interpret the results as exact thoughts?

If the brain uses extremely low voltage signals to communicate (from what I understand around 100 mV), what sort of breakthroughs would be necessary to intercept these signals and interpret them as ...
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1answer
109 views

What is an auditory upward sweep?

I was reading an article in nature communications, when I came across this sentence: "The ‘match’ rule was indicated by either a blue circle or a auditory upward sweep".So I tried googling what was an ...
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1answer
668 views

Is brain transplantation possible?

Many organs can be transplanted nowadays, including the liver, lungs and kidneys. Can the brain be transplanted?
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3answers
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Mechanism of Decorticate & Decerebrate Posturing? Also why is only Decorticate Rigidity a misnomer?

I read these two from various books, and got confused. The confusion is - Reticulospinal tracts control gamma motor neurons. Gamma motor neurons control tone of muscle. In decerebrate rigidity, the ...
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2answers
4k views

How long can the brain survive during ongoing cardiac arrest?

There was this interesting discussion on CPR and defib in response to the question "Why can't we defibrillate the heart within 1 minute after ventricular fibrillation by electroshock?". Now I was ...
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2answers
659 views

How do humans perceive time?

We can see length, and other physical quantities. We can perceive through our other senses like (temperature through thermoreceptors, weight through pressure receptors etc.). But how do we "sense" ...
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1answer
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Can rapid eye blinking induce epileptic seizures?

Photosensitive epilepsies are characterized by visually-induced seizures. Flashing-light stimuli are known to induce seizures in some (but not all) patients. My question is whether people with this ...
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2answers
172 views

Are Purkinje Action Potentials Neuronal and Cardiac?

I first thought that action potentials of His-bundle i.e. Purkinje fibers are Cardiac. However, I started to think that this is not enough. I think now that they are neuronal and cardiac. My ...
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0answers
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Recovering Coma patient with theoretical full knowledge of heart function

In coma, there is the medullary depression (stage of agony). Spontaneous respiration and circulation cease i.e. vasomotor center. There is no full circulatory and respiratory support. Assume you ...
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2answers
724 views

EM Brainwaves VS Brain Wave (EEG) [closed]

The brain purportedly produces very weak EM waves. EEG is a method of measuring electrical brain activity, it has classifications for the types of brain wave it can detect: Theta, Alpha, Beta, Gamma ...
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2answers
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What is the biological principle of this “holotropic breathwork” technique?

Holotropic breathwork is a non-drug technique developed by Stanislav Grof used in psychotherapy. The therapy as a whole is usually called holotropic breathwork (at least by Grof himself) and will most ...