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Questions tagged [neurology]

The medical specialty involving the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of disease involving the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle.

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Does DNA contain genetic memory?

A family member can have similar phobias. I guess these are related. Does the DNA contain the memories of our ancestors?
T Faustina Oviya's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
26 views

Is Regenerative Brain Tissue Technology In The Near Future?

I got 99% of my information from articles I found in NIH's library; I can't cite anything now because I am on a timed session in a public library. I've been reading material from research papers in ...
Salus's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Can cells straddle different anatomical systems in the body?

I'm reading Periphery by Moses V. Chao, and the author explains that the peripheral nervous system consists of the portion of the nervous system outside the brain and spinal cord. But, if I understand ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
13 votes
2 answers
2k views

Do the foldings in the brain vary person to person?

Can the gyri and sulcus, which are the foldings of the cerebrum, vary from person to person? If that is true, then can we say different people have different types of thinking skills? I believed that ...
Vidushi Aggarwal's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Can an axon recieve signal from other neuron or axon of other neuron?

As there is a very complex network of neurons in our brain so could it happen that an axon can recieves a signal from another parallel axon ?
Vidushi Aggarwal's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
89 views

Does communication with new parts of body requires internal changes in brain?

I am not a biological scientist and have low biology knowledges in general, but I want to know some thing. Most of us probably can't even imagine what it feels the sixth finger to be touched. Because ...
Stdugnd4ikbd's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

What is regional homogeneity in neurology?

newbie to.neurology here. For context, I'm studying this article (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-89166-8#Sec14) which relates the gut microbiome to brain structure in schizophrenia ...
Specs_Goldfish's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
215 views

What are the factors affecting reaction time and/or reflex velocity?

So there was this video of a cat killing a snake: Cat reaction time and another of a bobcat killing a rattlesnake Bobcat kills rattlesnake And then this from wikipedia on sand cats: In the Ténéré, a ...
Aurelius's user avatar
  • 197
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21 views

Stroke research question - has there been research in mirroring muscle electrical signals from a good limb to the bad one?

Transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation is an established tool to help stroke victims recover use of a paralyzed limb by engaging neuroplasticity. Has anyone here heard of research where you wear ...
mj_'s user avatar
  • 369
0 votes
1 answer
61 views

What specific molecules cause the difference in spectral sensitivity in the cones?

What causes the difference in their spectral sensitivity of the S, M and L cones. I'm guessing that the opsin or photopigments are different, but haven't been able figure out conclusively from my web ...
vxs's user avatar
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13 votes
1 answer
848 views

Does the recent concern over several papers about Aβ*56 call into question the association of Alzheimers Disease with any amyloyd beta oligomer forms?

The news item by Charles Piller just published in Science BLOTS ON A FIELD? A neuroscience image sleuth finds signs of fabrication in scores of Alzheimer’s articles, threatening a reigning theory of ...
uhoh's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
22 views

What is the relationship between stress granules and circular RNAs?

I have read that circRNAs act as sponges for miRNAs and that stress granules help reduce chronic cellular stress and they are composed of proteins and RNAs. I'm interested in the relationship between ...
Shadan Alrawi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
80 views

How does a neuron change its function, without changing its synaptic connections?

How does a neuron change its characteristics in order to change its function, without changing its connections with the neural networks? Basically, do any organelles change their properties and are ...
eengeeneer's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
83 views

Abnormally fast nerve conduction

Is there any neurological condition or disease where nerve conduction becomes abnormally fast? We know that myelinated neurons conduct impulses much more rapidly than non-myelinated ones as the myelin ...
Arkajyoti Banerjee's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
68 views

What is the probability for an offspring to inherit schizophrenia? [closed]

If an European male (i.e. white) is diagnosed with schizophrenia, but an European female (also white) 2-3 years younger than the male is healthy, what is the probability that their first child will: a)...
mercury0114's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
69 views

How is Vitamin D deficiency linked to multiple sclerosis? [closed]

Numbness and tingling in various parts of the body can be linked to the deficiency if vitamin D in one's diet. Also, multiple sclerosis has Vitamin D deficiency as one of its risk factors. How exactly ...
Arkajyoti Banerjee's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
152 views

Appropriate cell lines to study depression

Short introduction I'm studying depression from a biochemical point of view. My interest lies in the study of protein biomarkers and I was wondering which cell lines may be appropriate for this ...
Sam's user avatar
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-3 votes
1 answer
63 views

How are electrodes working? (EEG) [closed]

How do electrodes receive signals from the brain when using/doing an EEG? Is there some "circuit" for it? Is it harmful if you have many (more than 50-100) on your head? I found out that ...
Jakob's user avatar
  • 19
1 vote
1 answer
53 views

Read neural activity only having access to the brain from the "outside"

Is it possible to read neural activity from the outside of the head and if you had an machine learning algorithm that could learn what the signals "mean" (for example moving the right arm)? ...
Jakob's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
19 views

I just do not understand how myelination speeds up action potentials [duplicate]

first off, I've watched like 7 youtube videos, read a bunch of articles, and the explanations for why myelination actually increases action potential propagation differ each time are very vague. I've ...
William's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
72 views

How are thoughts biologicaly generated?

I want to know how thoughts are biologicaly generated. I know that electrical impulses can trigger formed memories in the brain but what I want to know is how the electrical impulse is generated in ...
Ganesh Shakti Kozak's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
180 views

Why exactly does UMN lesion cause hypertonia?

The corticospinal tracts are excitatory in nature (Glutaminergic). So damage of the CST would mean less excitatory input to the LMN. By this logic, there should not be hypertonia. What is the ...
ANA negative's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
92 views

The Relationship between Copper and Alzheimer's Disease

I've been reading up about the research concerning the etiological factors behind Alzheimer's and I came across two papers - "Studies on Copper induced stability changes in DNA fragment (GCA ATC ...
AOD's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
36 views

Can Inositol triphosphate (IP3)-mediated Calcium release on its own cause membrane depolarization?

This is about smooth muscles. I know that the Voltage-operated Ca²+ channels on the smooth muscle membrane can be opened by membrane depolarization to threshold. I also know that this depolarization ...
Chemo-Mike's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
78 views

Can potassium ions depolarise neuron membranes?

I am reading a journal paper about the cell adhesion molecule NCAM2 and I have come across the following statement: To confirm the functionality of the reporters, neurons were time-lapse recorded ...
ceno980's user avatar
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0 votes
3 answers
283 views

If due to some reasons a small portion of our neurons die, how does our body remake them?

There are various reasons such as intake of neurotoxins, and possibly traumatic injuries, that can cause neurons to die. After several hundreds, or thousands of our neurons die, how does our body ...
Fghj's user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

What are kinesiological factors? [duplicate]

I am in search of a term that describes movement, or practice of motor skills, as a factor of laterality. Would "kinesiological" be appropriate? I'll leave my two previous questions down ...
AgentMFaith's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
779 views

When and Why does G0 phase occur?

I've asked this question, specifically because i've seen this question. As we see in this diagram , G0 phase occurs after M phase and at a specific point within G1 phase. Is there a meaning to ...
JKR's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
35 views

What type of factor is practice of motor skills?

I recently asked a question about the cause of motor laterality: What causes motor laterality/ side dominance? I understand that there can be genetic factors, epigenetic factors, or environmental ...
AgentMFaith's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
24 views

Does the corpus callosum have a significant relationship with motor memories/ muscle memories?

With the corpus callosum located in the cerebrum, and motor memories having a closer relationship to the cerebellum (which I'm not quite sure about), is there a significant relationship between the ...
AgentMFaith's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
49 views

What causes motor laterality/ side dominance?

I would like to understand what leads up to motor laterality, or side dominance of motor skills. I made this assumption that it depends on neuroplasticity and the side in which one first learns the ...
AgentMFaith's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

Myelination of 1st Order Neurons in Spinal Cord Ascending Tracts

When a 1st order sensory neuron enters the Dorsal Column Ascending Pathway (i.e. Spinal Cord), does it get its myelination from Oligodendrocytes (as inside CNS) or it retains Schwann Cell myelination?
ANA negative's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
55 views

Is grip force a reflex?

When we reach for an object, for example, a cup, is the force used to hold it a reflex? Which sensorial information is used to select the force to hold it? Why I am interested in this question With ...
Odano Naotake's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
114 views

Are “tremors” and “ tetanic contractions” the same thing?

Do these two expressions have the same meaning? 1- Tetanic contractions in the skeletal muscles 2- Rythmic shaking of the hands (These two expressions are supposed to be two symptoms of Parkinson’s ...
user261947's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
44 views

Alternative hypothesis for learning in brain beyond the hebbian rule

I was reading on wikipedia that there are exceptions to the hebbian rule, and I was curious about the possibilities of other hypotheses of how learning occur in the brain. So I would like to know: ...
Raphael Augusto's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
104 views

How do anticholinesterase pesticides kill nematodes?

Compounds that inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase are commonly used as pesticides. In animals with centralized respiratory systems controlled by the nervous system, poisoning with an ...
user73910's user avatar
  • 409
-2 votes
3 answers
139 views

If the Brain can store as much information as a billion hard disks why cant i memorize a single word document of random letters?

I read a lot of articles on this and all seem to agree that the brain storage in neural connections is tremendous but that doesnt explain why we forget things so easily and have such a modest memory ...
SOSXX's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
36 views

Is downregulation of neurological receptors fully reversible, i.e. complete upregulation and resensitization?

Are down/upregulation truly reciprocal mechanisms? After a binding ligand or agonist is removed, such as a prescription medication, is upregulation and resensitization able to occur to a level that ...
jbarr89's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
0 answers
26 views

static versus dynamic equilibrium when bending over

When a person stoops/bends over, is the equilibrium functioning static equilibrium or dynamic equilibrium? I am not sure, because on the one hand the person is not moving (static), however, his/her ...
dalta's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
1 answer
91 views

Can a brain be damaged by overstimulation?

I am wondering what, if any, long term health effects there are from high levels of brain activity. I don't mean cases where a brain is being artificially stimulated, but rather where there is a high ...
spraff's user avatar
  • 513
3 votes
1 answer
123 views

How does an electrical impulse spread in a muscle fiber spread from the motor end plate?

Does this impulse in skeletal muscle spread much in the same way it does in neurons, with an initial potential change that spreads to its immediate surroundings and is then re-amplified or is it the ...
Dahen's user avatar
  • 323
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

What causes sodium channels to open?

What triggers the opening of sodium channels in a neuronal membrane? Is it acetylcholine that activates sodium channels in the postsynaptic membrane? Are sodium channels like receptors that have to ...
stressed out's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
135 views

Speed of electric signal vs chemical diffusion

I'm currently reading the book, "An Introduction to Nervous Systems" by Ralph J. Greenspan. On page 20, there is a sentence that confused me. It was, "Electrical signaling has the advantage of being ...
AP2261's user avatar
  • 392
3 votes
1 answer
227 views

What differentiates neurons in different parts of the brain?

For example: what makes a neuron in the hippocampus of the brain different from a neuron in, say, the amygdala, or the frontal lobe, or anywhere else in the brain? Do neurons in different parts of the ...
user73910's user avatar
  • 409
2 votes
1 answer
104 views

Does loss of dopaminergic neurons totally eliminate voluntary muscular control?

Breathing is a function that is not only autonomic, but can also be temporarily overridden and placed under voluntary control. In fact, you are now breathing manually. Now, suppose that someone has ...
user73910's user avatar
  • 409
2 votes
2 answers
403 views

How do organophosphates actually work?

The common explanation as to what the primary mechanism of action for organophosphates (and carbamates) is is the inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase and resulting buildup of acetylcholine ...
user73910's user avatar
  • 409
1 vote
0 answers
48 views

What substances can selectively destroy certain cells?

Recently, I've watched a documentary about how, in the 1980s, people were buying and using drugs from the streets and then becoming paralyzed a few days afterwards. The drugs that they were using were ...
user73910's user avatar
  • 409
7 votes
0 answers
100 views

What phosphorylates tau protein & and what causes tau to be phosphorylated?

I want to know what phosphorylates tau protein and its 6 isoforms. I know kinases cause phosphorylation events, and in tau it can be phosphorylated in a healthy neuron in the trans conformation, but ...
user3665690's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
46 views

Can motor neurons in the brain stem start movements?

Supposedly (consciouss) movement is started in the cerebral cortex. But some time ago I've read a research which stated it might be possible some movements (not specified which ones, probably mean ...
Pablo's user avatar
  • 2,891
1 vote
0 answers
66 views

Do non-human primates have mental disorders like humans?

I was at the zoo today and watched a gorilla pick at a scab on its finger, compulsively, until it started bleeding. Is this OCD or is it just a nervous thing that non-human primates do at the zoo? Do ...
Thashika Dilmin's user avatar