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Questions tagged [neurology]

The medical specialty involving the diagnosis and treatment of all categories of disease involving the central, peripheral, and autonomic nervous systems, including their coverings, blood vessels, and all effector tissue, such as muscle.

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What causes the range of severity of neurological deficits in Down's syndrome?

It's known that the severity of symptoms caused by a trisomy 21 varies from individual to individual. Part of the explanation for this range of severity is the finding that 94% of Down's syndrome ...
AliceD's user avatar
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18 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is the cause that angina pectoris is felt in your left arm?

When someone has heart problems sometimes they feel pain in their left arm. But why is the left arm painful?
Marijn 's user avatar
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14 votes
3 answers
2k views

How do we know the brain flips images projected on the retina back around?

Why do we turn images upside down again rather than dealing with them directly, still vertically rotated after passing through our lens? I don't see how that would cause any problems, and how we'd ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 243
13 votes
2 answers
2k views

Do the foldings in the brain vary person to person?

Can the gyri and sulcus, which are the foldings of the cerebrum, vary from person to person? If that is true, then can we say different people have different types of thinking skills? I believed that ...
Vidushi Aggarwal's user avatar
13 votes
1 answer
848 views

Does the recent concern over several papers about Aβ*56 call into question the association of Alzheimers Disease with any amyloyd beta oligomer forms?

The news item by Charles Piller just published in Science BLOTS ON A FIELD? A neuroscience image sleuth finds signs of fabrication in scores of Alzheimer’s articles, threatening a reigning theory of ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 5,598
12 votes
3 answers
399 views

Which part of the brain needs to be shut down to lose conciousness?

Whether it is mechanical (trauma), chemical (anaesthesia) or electrical - which part of the brain is shut down to cause loss of consciousness?
Ram Manohar M's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
1k views

How does methamphetamine (meth) damage neurons?

Meth is considered to be neurotoxic by forming reactive oxygen species and oxidizing the neurons. But unlike dopamine, which, by the way, is neurotoxic due to ROS induced dopaminergic stress, meth ...
kirill2485's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
4k views

What is a inhibitory tone when talking about neurons?

In this SE answer: Could an "overactive" brain increase the chances of Alzheimer's Disease? user @nico used the word inhibitory tone What does that ...
Gabriel Fair's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
1k views

Are there any types of cancer that cause neurons to divide?

After birth neurons generally do not divide. But is there any specific type of rare cancer or tumour where neurons divide? And if there is such a cancer, then how is it possible for a neuron to regain ...
saptarshi's user avatar
  • 101
10 votes
1 answer
828 views

Foveal ganglion cell density (Tay-Sachs Disease)

I’m currently reading on Tay-Sachs disease and have stumbled upon something regarding the typical “cherry red” macula symptom. On the one hand it is mentioned that the macula is almost devoid of ...
mivilar's user avatar
  • 288
9 votes
1 answer
979 views

Why do humans alone have the capability to have religious/spiritual experiences?

What is it in our brain that makes having such experiences possible? I assume other species don't have these. Sure there are instances in the natural world where you can see individuals of the species ...
deostroll's user avatar
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9 votes
4 answers
2k views

Is there any way a human could whistle and be unable to speak?

Is there any situation anatomically, where a human could understand the speech of others perfectly, without any capabilities of speech themselves, but would retain the ability to whistle with a tune? ...
Mike.C.Ford's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
789 views

Is brain transplantation possible?

Many organs can be transplanted nowadays, including the liver, lungs and kidneys. Can the brain be transplanted?
Irvan Santoso's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
4k views

How long can the brain survive during ongoing cardiac arrest?

There was this interesting discussion on CPR and defib in response to the question "Why can't we defibrillate the heart within 1 minute after ventricular fibrillation by electroshock?". Now I was ...
AliceD's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
615 views

Why do neurons lose the potential to regenerate and reproduce in adult animals?

I have read in several books that neurons in the central nervous system lose the power to regenerate after some developmental stage but why do they? Can we artificially induce regeneration?
Amit Rana's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
129 views

Are there any known rules that neurons always follow while transmitting/receiving signals?

I'm new to neurobiology so I don't know much about it. However, I have worked on artificial neural networks. Man-made AI networks all follow a handful of simple rules. I was wondering if biological ...
Rainer Plumer's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
2k views

Can rapid eye blinking induce epileptic seizures?

Photosensitive epilepsies are characterized by visually-induced seizures. Flashing-light stimuli are known to induce seizures in some (but not all) patients. My question is whether people with this ...
zordman's user avatar
  • 183
7 votes
0 answers
100 views

What phosphorylates tau protein & and what causes tau to be phosphorylated?

I want to know what phosphorylates tau protein and its 6 isoforms. I know kinases cause phosphorylation events, and in tau it can be phosphorylated in a healthy neuron in the trans conformation, but ...
user3665690's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
448 views

Why Is Gray Matter Gray?

When I researched I found different reason for this, the popular ones are 1) white matter is mylinated .this reason was given in reference books and this website while others say 2)cell body ...
Sudhanva's user avatar
  • 327
6 votes
1 answer
3k views

Why is it that I can understand speech through one ear better than the other ear?

First, I do a lot of music so I'm used to pick up details in sound and I have had hearing tests showing that my ears are quite well balanced, for my age, without any dead spots. When I am in a social ...
Thomas's user avatar
  • 1,103
6 votes
2 answers
4k views

Is it possible to process electrical signals from the brain and interpret the results as exact thoughts?

If the brain uses extremely low voltage signals to communicate (from what I understand around 100 mV), what sort of breakthroughs would be necessary to intercept these signals and interpret them as ...
greenMamBa's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the biological principle of this "holotropic breathwork" technique?

Holotropic breathwork is a non-drug technique developed by Stanislav Grof used in psychotherapy. The therapy as a whole is usually called holotropic breathwork (at least by Grof himself) and will most ...
Void's user avatar
  • 161
6 votes
4 answers
573 views

Hebbian theory "fire together" clarification

Donald Hebb states it as follows: "Let us assume that the persistence or repetition of a reverberatory activity (or "trace") tends to induce lasting cellular changes that add to its stability.… ...
kalfasyan's user avatar
  • 385
6 votes
1 answer
411 views

Long term effects of "brain freeze" on the cerebral vasculature

According to one theory, ice cream headaches are caused by an increase in blood volume of the anterior cerebral artery: Another theory into the cause of ice-cream headaches is explained by increased ...
jonsca's user avatar
  • 4,761
6 votes
2 answers
38k views

Calcium levels and nerve hyperexcitation

Why does lower blood calcium levels (or lower calcium levels in ECF) cause nervous hyperexcitaton? Why does it cause over stimulation of nerves and muscles and spasmic contractions of muscles? This is ...
user4059's user avatar
  • 211
6 votes
3 answers
38k views

Mechanism of Decorticate & Decerebrate Posturing? Also why is only Decorticate Rigidity a misnomer?

I read these two from various books, and got confused. The confusion is - Reticulospinal tracts control gamma motor neurons. Gamma motor neurons control tone of muscle. In decerebrate rigidity, the ...
gautampw's user avatar
  • 141
6 votes
1 answer
529 views

Nocioception (pain perception) in subcutaneous tissue

There seem to be no nocioceptors (pain and temperature sensitive nerve endings) in subcutaneous fat. there are nocioceptors and other receptors in veins running through fat, but these can be avoided. ...
John's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
771 views

Neuron connectivity- how are they connected physically

If Neurons are only connected through synapse and there is no physical connection, how are they just suspended in brain layers?
Anon's user avatar
  • 51
5 votes
1 answer
6k views

Action potential and sodium channels

In this video on electro tonic potential, the tutor says that when the potassium channels open the potential drops from +40mV to -80mV, where the sodium channels have already closed at +40mV. Now in ...
Shefali's user avatar
  • 464
5 votes
1 answer
564 views

What is synaptic bias?

In non linear model of a neuron there was a mention about bias (Bₖ) which was the summation of the synaptic weights. I want to understand what synaptic bias is and their application/use in neuronal ...
Shiva's user avatar
  • 51
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is the specific role of the cerebellum when it comes to 'coordinating movement'?

In elementary biology (high school level in the UK - A levels), we are told that the cerebellum is the part of the brain that 'coordinates movement'. Literally nobody takes the time to explain what ...
Mathematician's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
104 views

How do anticholinesterase pesticides kill nematodes?

Compounds that inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase are commonly used as pesticides. In animals with centralized respiratory systems controlled by the nervous system, poisoning with an ...
user73910's user avatar
  • 409
5 votes
1 answer
4k views

Why can't dopamine cross the blood brain barrier but l-dopa can?

Levodopa can cross the BBB and is less lipid soluble then dopamine, so dopamine should be able to cross the BBB more easily then l-dopa, but for some reason dopamine cant cross the BBB. Both dl-...
kirill2485's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
576 views

Neuroscience of mathematicians

I've tried to google this but everything that comes up are things like "mathematical neuroscience" rather than the other way around. Specifically, I'm interested in the workings of a mathematician's ...
SorcererofDM's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
351 views

Is it possible to be (briefly) aware you had been decapitated?

If a person's head was cleanly and rapidly decapitated by a sharp blade slicing through the neck, such as would happen on the guillotine, could that person remain conscious? If so for how long? Long ...
Bohemian's user avatar
  • 693
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

What neuro-motor diseases cause the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to malfunction?

Please note: This question is neither homework nor seeking medical advice. I'm simply asking for a factual, objective, biological explanation of the various neuro-motor diseases/illnesses that can act ...
smeeb's user avatar
  • 639
5 votes
1 answer
100 views

Is there a type of amnesia that separately affects long-term memory?

Is there a medical condition that affects the long term memory, but leaves the short-term and working memories totally or fairly intact?
karpuz's user avatar
  • 78
5 votes
1 answer
81 views

What other cognitive behaviors in bees, outside of navigation, are affect by neonicotinoids

It is conclusive that neonicotinoids alter navigation in bees when locating food sources. http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0091364 But if so, shouldn't cognition also ...
Chitinous Exoskeleton's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why does our face get red during anger?

My attempt: This site says that it is due to flight or fight mechanism, which results in more amount of blood being passed to face causing red face. But isn't it wasteful for our body to send more ...
JM97's user avatar
  • 4,836
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is two photon calcium imaging?

I have encountered the term "two photon calcium imaging" in a few papers. I have tried to look in the internet but can't understand what this technique actually is. I will be very happy for ...
user135172's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
552 views

Amount of neurons in the heart

Finding numbers for the amount of neurons in the brain is quite easy. Finding them for other human organs is harder. How many neurons are there in the human heart?
Christian's user avatar
  • 2,616
4 votes
1 answer
212 views

Why don't neurons die during a stent procedure in the brain?

Stents are used to provide scaffolding to the blood vessels. When they are used in arteries or arterioles in brain, won't neurons die because of lack of oxygen during procedure?
yjb's user avatar
  • 51
4 votes
1 answer
73 views

Why can nervous inflammation radiate symmetrically in the limbs?

I have had carpal tunnel syndrome in my hands this week, when the nerve in the pith of your palm, through thumb and index, is pinched, and swells, inside the wrist ligament tunnel. In a few days, ...
bandybabboon's user avatar
  • 10.4k
4 votes
2 answers
205 views

Reflexes & Pathologies including the Vagus Nerve

I only know the vasovagal reflex. I would really appreciate if someone could inform me about the other ones. About the pathologies, I already know the effects of direct nerve damage. I am talking ...
karpuz's user avatar
  • 41
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Will neurons live after the death of a human? If so, how long?

I don't know if this is correct or not, but I have heard this from a friend and I want to get a clear explanation about this.I hope there is some one who can help me.
Adma's user avatar
  • 41
4 votes
1 answer
78 views

Can potassium ions depolarise neuron membranes?

I am reading a journal paper about the cell adhesion molecule NCAM2 and I have come across the following statement: To confirm the functionality of the reporters, neurons were time-lapse recorded ...
ceno980's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
625 views

Effects of exercise on the brain

I am well aware of the phenomenon of neurogenesis induced by exercise, as well as the dopamine release that results from exercise. I am really interested in neuropsychology and the effects of exercise ...
Rustyn's user avatar
  • 180
4 votes
0 answers
49 views

What causes motor laterality/ side dominance?

I would like to understand what leads up to motor laterality, or side dominance of motor skills. I made this assumption that it depends on neuroplasticity and the side in which one first learns the ...
AgentMFaith's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
399 views

Would methamphetamine heal wounds, infections, and diseases?

Alright, so this sounds crazy but based on these research findings it is safe to assume that meth would allow wounds and diseases to heal faster by interleukin 6 . On the otherhand, using meth during ...
kirill2485's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
837 views

How do humans perceive time?

We can see length, and other physical quantities. We can perceive through our other senses like (temperature through thermoreceptors, weight through pressure receptors etc.). But how do we "sense" ...
Soham's user avatar
  • 201