Questions tagged [neuroscience]

The study of the structure and function of the nervous system and its components.

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219 views

Neuronal coordinates of C.elegans

Is there a list of neural coordinates for C.elegans? I need it to build a 3D model. Update: What is available at the moment is: full connectome for example, at openconnectome; neuron description ...
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88 views

Behavioral change in dolphins during different hemispheres activity periods?

It is known that dolphins never sleep in the sense that we do, instead they have one hemisphere of the brain sleeping while the other one is awake. I wonder, do they show observable changes in ...
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690 views

Pharmacologically, can tricyclic antidepressants have a side-effect profile similar to neuroleptics?

Torticollis (wryneck, cervical dystonia) is a neurologic movement disorder causing involuntary muscle spasms in the neck. Often, neuroleptics can cause such a side effect. I'm wondering if this ...
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274 views

Origin of logarithmic sense responses?

It's my understanding that most human sensory systems obey an approximately logarithmic stimulus/response curve. This includes the visual system, auditory system, and the smallest perceptible ...
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198 views

Why do fishes have both a gustatory and an olfactory system?

I would like to know if there is a reason why fishes (and many aquatic species) have both an olfactory and a gustatory system. As far as I know, in all fish species the chemoreceptors, organs and ...
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354 views

Disproportion in cranial nerve innervation?

The cranial nerve innervation is highly disproportionate, as far as humans are concerned. I am not sure of the advantage of being innervated by cranial nerve versus being innervated by a normal ...
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518 views

Can acetylcholine leak away from the synapse and cause spasms?

I am currently studying Pharmacology and a question came to mind. We know that Acetylcholine is used as a neurotransmitter in the neuromuscular junction, both Sympathetic as Parasympathetic, but as I ...
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12k views

Can the human eye distinguish colors in the periphery?

In the back of my mind I have the idea that human eyes can't notice the color of objects in the far periphery, and that any subjective perception of colors is done by the brain that tries to fill in ...
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148 views

What controls gut motility?

I have two different papers. One claims that gut motility is reduced by stimulation of the Opioid κ and δ receptors. The receptors are activated by Morphine and certain derivatives, specifically ...
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1k views

Can turkeys run around when their head is cut off like chickens do?

Chickens may run around after their head is cut off if the head is severed near the base of the skull leaving the brain stem intact and missing the jugular vein. This usually only lasts for a few ...
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Why is it that I can understand speech through one ear better than the other ear?

First, I do a lot of music so I'm used to pick up details in sound and I have had hearing tests showing that my ears are quite well balanced, for my age, without any dead spots. When I am in a social ...
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What determines whether a substance can diffuse across the blood-brain-barrier?

What determines whether a chemical substance is able to cross the blood-brain-barrier via passive, transmembrane diffusion? What structurally differentiates these chemicals?
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Relationship between nerves and axons

I just wanted to get a realistic viewpoint of our nervous system. I understand arteries and veins, but I wanted to know how similar our nervous system is to that? I understand we have neurons (...
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1k views

What is the biological principle of this “holotropic breathwork” technique?

Holotropic breathwork is a non-drug technique developed by Stanislav Grof used in psychotherapy. The therapy as a whole is usually called holotropic breathwork (at least by Grof himself) and will most ...
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280 views

What structural features make a molecule a potent opioid receptor agonist?

For instance, take morphine. It is used as a baseline for measuring the potency of opioid agonists. Its structure looks like this: But then, take heroin, around three times as potent, its structure ...
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97 views

Are there any known rules that neurons always follow while transmitting/receiving signals?

I'm new to neurobiology so I don't know much about it. However, I have worked on artificial neural networks. Man-made AI networks all follow a handful of simple rules. I was wondering if biological ...
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885 views

What would happen if you “rewired” your eyes with your nose?

The nose sends sensory input through transduction of chemicals in the air via the olfactory nerves/tracts to the primary olfactory cortex. The eyes send sensory input through transduction of light ...
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278 views

How does the synaptic cleft exist?

I'm not asking why the synaptic cleft exists, i.e. what function it holds, rather how. So I know that the neurotransmitter diffuses across it, it is 20-40 nm wide and contains basal lamina (in NMJs at ...
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11k views

Effect of closed eyes on balance?

Suppose you want to stand on one leg. Doing it eyes open is not that difficult, but doing it eyes closed seems to be difficult. Why?
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502 views

Hebbian theory “fire together” clarification

Donald Hebb states it as follows: "Let us assume that the persistence or repetition of a reverberatory activity (or "trace") tends to induce lasting cellular changes that add to its stability.… ...
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1k views

What exactly is the neural receptive field?

Neural receptive fields map the spatial or temporal distribution of the data to individual neuron excitation, if I understand correctly, but I do not understand if receptive fields (especially in the ...
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Can children restore brain cells?

By "children" I mean young people at the age of 10 or lower. I know that the adult brain cannot restore brain cells, but what about children? I mean, the brain must develop from a few cells to a 90 ...
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312 views

Do smaller intelligent animals have a higher neuron density to account for their seeming intelligence? Otherwise, what?

It seems like there's a lot of very small animals that have a much higher intelligence than what you would expect if you linearly projected intelligence as a function of brain size. There's ravens, ...
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Can the dendrites of sensory neurons be a meter long?

The typical textbook structure of neurons is a cell with a short dendritic tree and a long axon. The dendrites receive information and send it to the axon via the cell body (soma). The axon is a long ...
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241 views

Brain + ethanol experiment suggestions needed

I need to demonstrate the effects of ethanol on a human brain (or other brain with developed telencephalon) in vitro; ideally the effects on vigilance and/or memory. Could you please suggest such an ...
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140 views

What color does the other cone in Tetrachromacy correspond to?

Human with normal vision possesses 3 cones, which correspond to blue (S), green (M) and red (L). What about tetrachromacy, where people have 4 cones in their retinae? What is the fourth cone exactly, ...
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142 views

Is synesthesia caused by crossing the circuitry of different sensory inputs?

I have a question about human perception. After reading the book "Sensory Perceptual Issues in Autism and Asperger Syndrome" and knowing about synesthesia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia) ...
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2k views

Why does the “all-or-none” principle hold true for only single nerve cell, and not a bunch of nerve cells?

I've read this from wikipedia: ... This relationship holds only for the unit of tissue; for nervous tissue the unit is the nerve cell, for skeletal muscle the unit is the individual muscle fiber ...
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Why does the refractory period of neurons only allow signals to pass in one direction?

My textbook states that the advantages of the refractory period is that it means that action potentials are discrete and also that it results in signals only being able to pass one way, but provides ...
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685 views

Dopamine paradox in schizophrenia

If there is more dopamine action in the mesocortical pathway in schizophrenia, then schizophrenics should always be in euphoric state. Instead, schizophrenics often lack motivation and do not ...
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237 views

Zombie Ant Fungus?

Ophiocordyceps unilateralis is a parasitoidal fungus that alters the behavior of the infected. Source: Wiki page. How is the fungus able to alter the behavior of the infected to such specfic ...
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169 views

Bugs' love for light

Do bugs love light bulbs because they resemble the stars or is it the sun? How do they sense the bulb? What is the purpose of this "brightophilia" that has evolved in insects?
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1k views

Why do living things go belly up as they die? [closed]

I have seen birds, lizards, frogs, fish, etc in various places on their back dead. May be insecticides cause them to flip over but I do not believe every upside down creature died by poison as stated ...
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508 views

Can low temperatures induce a withdrawal reflex?

I read in "Essentials of Pathophysiology: Concepts of Altered Health States By Carol Porth" that "The thermal pain receptors are stimulated only by extremes of temperature such as "freezing cold" ...
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764 views

How does the brain train its neural network?

One question that came up learning how artificial neural networks are working was how the brain can train its neural network? When we say we have an artificial neural network, the problem behind it ...
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272 views

Why does ALS start in middle age?

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) often starts at middle age, but I didn't find any suggestion why. Something seems to trigger the symptoms in middle age. If I am not mistaken, the sporadic ALS is ...
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Case study and speculations on the brain of Edward Mordake

I am very interested in the case of the man named Edward Mordake who lived in the 19th century. In particular, he had two faces. If you have not heard of this man, please, search this up as there are ...
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2answers
2k views

How does the brain know where a signal came from? What is the addressing system

I am an electronic engineer so I am thinking about this from an electronics outlook. How does the addressing system work, As I see it, the nervous system is small parallel branches attached to larger ...
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606 views

If a dead snake reflexively attacks itself, why does it not always attack itself?

Recently there has been this video going around of a snake that had been decapitated. Its body swung around to the decapitated head and the head attacked the body on "reflex". Now we know that most ...
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1answer
142 views

Why do larger diameter myelinated axons have greater conduction velocities than small diameter myelinated axons?

A canonical statement I have frequently read is that "large diameter axons conduct action potentials at faster velocities than small diameter axons". After recently learning the effect of increased ...
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150 views

Can light function as a neurotransmitter?

Any animal with an eye has photoreceptors, which are essentially light-sensitive neurons. Green algae have channelrhodopsin, which are ion channels that open and close in response to light. Clearly, ...
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144 views

Are there any organisms, extant or extinct, that have only one neuron?

Nervous systems are useful in one way because they allow for integration of complex information. They are also useful because they transmit information very rapidly, over a large distance. However, ...
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247 views

Does some form of self organizing map exist in the brain?

Self organizing maps (SOM's) are an extremely interesting and powerful tool in the field of artificial neural networks. My question is: Does something similar exist in the brain? Or are these systems ...
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3answers
5k views

What are tail currents?

This is a voltage clamp on an ion channel. When the voltage is stopped there is a still a current at the end (the tail current). I understand that the gates aren't completely closed because of which ...
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429 views

How does the brain recall information?

In computers, finding a single word is realized through serial attempts across all available connections to find a specified target. How does the brain solve this? How does the whole process, from ...
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266 views

What is the core mechanism behind neuroplasticity?

Specifically I am looking at reopening of the critical period of plasticity. Modern neuroscience has started to unlock the secret of neuroplasticity. A common experimental setup is with mice. They ...
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2answers
576 views

Are there neuron mediated reactions faster than reflexes?

I'm interested in how fast the human body can respond to a stimulus. I know the fastest reflex, the blink reflex, operates around 100ms from stimulus to reaction. I also know that the blink reflex ...
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364 views

Criteria for compound action potential thresholds

As opposed to action potential thresholds (which are binary yes/no events), electrophysiological thresholds of compound action potentials are arbitrary. Mostly a certain noise level is picked and when ...
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269 views

Why Goldman Equation cannot be used to calculate dynamic changes of membrane potential

I'm reading about Goldman Equation and I've seen in some resources that it calculates the resting potential (not membrane potential in general) and that this equation cannot be used when membrane ...
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563 views

Does a generator potential pass along a nerve the same way an action potential does?

I have read that a generator potential is a localized depolarization of a membrane. Does that mean that it does not pass along a neuron the same way an action potential does ? If not, then how do ...

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