Questions tagged [neurotransmitter]

Small molecules involved in the propagation of a nerve signal across the synapses.

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1answer
115 views

Do presynaptic neurons and postsynaptic neurons have different compositions of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters?

For example if certain neurotransmitter is released, will there be neurons that won’t be even potentially affected, because it doesn’t have such type receptors?
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0answers
92 views

Loss of nerves in asthma

This site says: VIP [vasoactive intestinal peptide] nerves are absent in severely asthmatic subjects. Mice with targeted deletion of the VIP gene exhibit histopathologic features of airway ...
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2answers
128 views

How does different sensory stimuli differ in nerve signal?

Every day, we experience different types of sensory stimulus, like heat, pain, cold, etc. However, in each case, the transmission of the stimulus to the brain through the neurones is carried on in ...
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1answer
417 views

What is a starter cell?

I am reading the paper Cooperative Subnetworks of Molecularly Similar Interneurons in Mouse Neocortex and a term "starter cell" apears there (page 6): This yielded tissue sections where SOM or ...
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0answers
934 views

Can human be emotionless?

Is it possible that a person can't produce, like, dopamine, serotonin, and other emotion hormones? Or, a part of the brain can't function to make one feel something?
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2answers
494 views

Do SSRIs downregulate or upregulate the 5-HT3 receptor?

What effect do SSRIs have on the expression of the ligand-gated ion channel, the 5-HT3 receptor?
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0answers
49 views

What are the on-rate and off-rate constants for 5-HT1 receptors binding 5-HT?

The class of 5-HT1 receptors binds serotonin (5-HT) reversibly (Wikipedia). I'm interested in the on-rate and off-rate constants $k_{\text{on}}$ and $k_{\text{off}}$ of this process. So my question ...
2
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1answer
79 views

Why do SRIs help in serotonergic neurotransmission?

Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) block the action of the serotonin transporter (SERT) which, according to Wikipedia, leads to an increase in serotonergic neurotransmission. Now this book ...
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1answer
7k views

How long does it take for dopamine to reach normal levels after a significant drop?

The building block sequence for is: Phenylalanine << Tyrosine << L-Dopa << Dopamine. It’s produced only in a few, very specific regions: Substantia Nigra and the Ventral Tegmental ...
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65 views

Charge distribution to neuron connections

How is charge generated by the action potential is distributed to all of the neuron connections? From what I understand the total charge transmitted by a neuron once it fires is same for every neuron. ...
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2answers
115 views

How long does a spiking signal last?

It is surprisingly hard to find information about the timing of neurons, in particular how long an action potential can contribute to the summation of a neuron. Is it on the order of milliseconds or ...
3
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1answer
261 views

How do sarcomeres coordinate contraction?

As can be seen from the figure if myosins from both sides apply equal force then how does muscle contract? And also how do actins resist tearing? Is there any kind of coordination between different ...
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1answer
5k views

What happens in your brain when you receive information which causes you to bristle?

I'm talking about moments when you watch a film and you bristle, or when you listen to music, etc. What kind of neurotransmitter flow changes?
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1answer
415 views

Why are so many recreational drugs serotonin 5-HT1A partial agonists?

I found out that many psychoactive drugs partially activate the 5HT1A receptor. Looking at Wikipedia, these include MDMA, LSD, CBD, Psliocybin/Psilocin, amphetamine and various other psychedelics, and ...
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2answers
304 views

Understanding the brain: how are neurotransmitters released in the brain?

I have a basic knowledge of how neural networks work. A potential difference is created that forces sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium ions to flow which carries an electrical signal to the end ...
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2answers
833 views

What is synaptic clearance?

Please explain what the term synaptic clearance means. For example, what would dopamine synaptic clearance be? It is important to me in context of dopamine signaling variation due to difference in ...
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1answer
81 views

What kind of changes “stays” in the neuron after the nervous impulse happened?

I often see in neuroscience textbooks about how the brain controls everything in the body with different tracts and etc, and it seems that information is always being transmitted, like there's no ...
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1answer
171 views

How does the brain manifest and realize the intention to resist sleep?

The question title says it all. What happens in my brain when I resist sleep? I would appreciate explanations on neurotransmitter changes, what areas of the brain activate to resist sleep, what can an ...
13
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1answer
429 views

Do mammals develop tolerance to anticholinergics?

I know that first generation H1 antagonists, commonly known as antihistamines have anticholinergic effects. Their sedative side effects go away due to tolerance, but as for their anticholinergic side ...
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0answers
112 views

Epigenetics and serotonin?

In this article http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v17/n9/full/nn.3778.html it states that Increased promoter methylation of the serotonin transporter gene predicted increased threat related ...
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0answers
669 views

Acetylcholine and muscles- excitatory or inhibitory? (muscle atonia and myasthenia gravis)

I have heard that acetylcholine can be excitatory or inhibitory, but I am confused as to which it is when it comes to muscles. On the one hand, I believe that muscle atonia during REM sleep is ...
3
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2answers
825 views

Can dietary monosodium glutamate intake induce restlestness?

The question is all in the title. More context: I like phở soup. I have noticed that I get restless after eating the phở soup at some restaurants. The effects are similar to the ones resulting from ...
3
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1answer
122 views

Neuroscience behind the crash

After experiencing things like stress, intense exercise, or using drugs such as caffeine and amphetamine, subjects often assume a depressive and lethargic state afterwards, known as a "crash." What is ...
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1answer
127 views

Oscillatory electrical system using a chain of neurons

Many daily activities that we perform are result of inbuilt oscillatory circuits in our body. For example walking, breathing, heart beat, blinking, etc. The coding and decoding of stored memory also ...
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2answers
1k views

What happens in the synapse when cocaine administration occurs in the human brain

As far as i know when you accept cocaine in your blood some cocaine molecules reach some synapses in your brain and fill some Reuptake tunnels preventing the cell to simply "do not know that fired ...
14
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4answers
9k views

Is there a correlation between total neurons and intelligence?

Thanks for looking. First off, I am not a biologist, just a curious layman, so I apologize in advance if this isn't a "good" question. Please don't downvote me into oblivion. I read today that the ...
2
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1answer
129 views

Is Norepinephrine beta2 adrenomimetic?

I know that it has alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 effects. It has beta2 receptor where epinephrine can effect. However, to say that it is beta adrenomimetic, I am not sure. That is ligand binding beta2 ...
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2answers
822 views

What are the physiological roles of Hydrogen sulfide?

I am thinking why hydrogen sulfide has its effects in the body. For instance, it is one Salmonella's virulence factor. I am not sure if such a balance equations holds H2O + H2S ←→ ... Actually, I ...
2
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4answers
8k views

Are neural connections one-way?

I'm trying to think about how two neurons communicate, typically shown in pictures as an electric pulse traveling along a long, thin connective tissue. Is this depiction somewhat accurate, and if so, ...
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0answers
40 views

Gastroenteritis virus causing mutation of the Enterochromaffin cells

I am working on the solution to a worldwide problem: IBS or chronic diarrhea following a viral gastroenteritis infection. I think I have an answer. The only missing piece to the puzzle I found in a ...
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4answers
626 views

Why has evolution made neurons use spiking?

I'm going to be forward and say that I'm not a biologist. I don't claim to fully understand the functionality of a neuron from an electrical/chemical perspective... I'm curiously gazing from the ...
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1answer
54 views

Modern research or study on patterns in nerve signals

I am trying to find any recent study on pattern recognition in nerve signals. It does not really matter the part of the body where the research is focused on. It can be anything from studying activity ...
2
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2answers
487 views

Resting and action membrane potential..?

In the resting membrane potential of neurons the inside of membrane is kept negative and outside of membrane is kept positive by the utilization of energy through Na-K Atpase pump, While during action ...
2
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0answers
39 views

Is it reasonable to assume that RNA polymerase would bind preferentially to the promoter of the long allele of the SERT gene?

I'm trying to come up with an idea for a school project (a hypothetical research study). I'm looking at depression and the serotonin transporter gene, which is highly expressed in the human ...
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1answer
911 views

What is meant by “neurotransmitters flooding the brain”?

I frequently hear expressions like "Dopamine flooding the brain" or "X neurotransmitter flooding the brain" used to communicate with general audiences. For example: "Following [orgasm]? oxytocin ...
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2answers
2k views

How does the brain know where a signal came from? What is the addressing system

I am an electronic engineer so I am thinking about this from an electronics outlook. How does the addressing system work, As I see it, the nervous system is small parallel branches attached to larger ...
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2answers
615 views

Do humans have a “dominant” neurotransmitter system/sensitivity within their brain?

I've recently heard a podcast, in which Dr. Helen Fisher suggests that there are "4 broad personality types", and each one is associated with a particular neurotransmitter: The corresponding ...
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1answer
8k views

What is the physiological difference between snorting/swallowing cocaine

I know that mucosa inside the nose absorbs cocaine molecules when snorting cocaine, but what difference is there compared to swallowing? Also more cocaine administration equals more cocaine molecules ...
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3answers
993 views

Mechanical cause of loss of consciousness

Consciousness is an electrical and chemical interaction in the brain, caused by neurons firing and chemical interactions. How does a mechanical "force" cause this to stop working? i.e. How does a ...
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1answer
5k views

Molecular cause of cramps, spasms and strengthening in muscles? (incl. intro to muscle contraction)

When motor neurons are stimulated to trigger an action potential, this potential propagates down the spine, eventually reaching a neuromuscular junction, causing the release of acetylcholine (ACh). ...
3
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1answer
876 views

How do muscle relaxants work?

Do they act directly on the muscle and actually relax muscle tissue and ease spasms, or do they just prevent your brain from receiving signals that inform you of tight muscles? In the latter case, ...
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2answers
443 views

Inverse of dopamine reuptake inhibitor?

The wikipedia article on the dopamine transporter gives examples of some drugs whose effects are mediated by the inhibition of the dopamine transporter, such as cocaine and amphetamines. Are there ...
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2answers
3k views

Physiological indicators of happiness and well being

If I understand it correctly, levels of serotonin in the brain can indicate if a person is happy. What other physiological measures indicate happiness or well being for a humans? I am looking for ...
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1answer
92 views

Are there any neurotransmitters that trigger all neurons?

I'm reading into the basics of the nervous system, and am intrigued by neurotransmitters. I understand that certain neurotransmitters can trigger more than one neuron type, and may be used as ...
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1answer
2k views

Does one neurotransmitter travel all the way through the nervous system?

Nerve impulses of course go really fast, but the neurotransmitters have to travel through millions of nerves, so how can it go that fast? Is it a sort of relay with lots of neurotransmitters taking ...
3
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1answer
176 views

Do serotonergic (5-HT2A-mediated) psychedelics elicit stimulant effects?

I know that 5-HT2A partial agonism is the key mechanism of action of serotonergic psychedelics but I also know that some research (e.g. the selective (no activity on any other known receptor sites) 5-...
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0answers
79 views

Are all Autoreceptors Downregulated by their Respective Endogenous Ligands?

I know that the 5-HT1A and $\alpha$2 adrenoreceptors receptors serve as autoreceptors for serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine respectively and are down-regulated by repeat exposure to their respective ...
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0answers
48 views

What Effect Does the Endocannabinoid System have on Monoaminergic Neurotransmission?

I know that Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and other cannabinoids increase dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens and that this is what results in the euphoria experienced by cannabis users. ...
3
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1answer
276 views

What is the cannabinoid autoreceptor?

"Is there a cannabinoid autoreceptor? And if so what is the cannabinoid autoreceptor?" (i.e. is the cannabinoid autoreceptor CB1, CB2 or is it one of the G protein coupled receptors, GPR18, GPR55 or ...
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33 views

Does regulate always mean suppress when it comes to heteroreceptors?

Do heteroreceptors always suppress the release of the neurotransmitter they regulate upon their (the heteroreceptor's) activation?