Questions tagged [nutrition]

The study of the appropriate provisions required to sustain life in an organism or the provisions themselves.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
8 views

How much myrosinase do mustard sprouts contain?

It is known that ground mustard seeds contain active myrosinase, but what about soaked or sprouted mustard seeds?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Why is it (allegedly) dangerous to feed ducks with breadcrumbs and pieces of bread?

I used to go down to the local lake all the time with leftover bread and throw little pieces of it to the hungry duckies, who very eagerly fetched it and ate it while happily quacking away. I thought ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

How much fat can the body absorb? Implications for daily fat distribution

This question is named analogous to this research: How much protein can the body use in a single meal for muscle-building? Implications for daily protein distribution http://ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

Do humans emit more carbon through respiration or defecation?

Where does most of the carbon we ingest go? I understand that a large amount is exhaled as carbon dioxide, but what percent is defecated (and theoretically deposited in the ground)?
3
votes
2answers
94 views

What is the cause of a protuberant belly in kwashiorkor?

Kwashiorkor is a PEM characterised usually by a pot belly. Of course, the obvious question, why is there a pot belly in the case of a malnutrition? I had been searching the cause of this for a while ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

What does a hornet nest foundress feed on?

After wintering, hornet queens will build a new nest from scratch. Once the new workers have hatched, they will fly out and collect carbohydrates to feed themselves and the queen and will also hunt ...
5
votes
2answers
118 views

What vitamins exist for other animals but not humans?

As you probably know, humans are among the minority of animals that require Vitamin C and don't produce it ourselves. For whatever reason (multiple theories exist), we lost the ability. Meanwhile, the ...
2
votes
0answers
31 views

How do Apes get their Omega 3s in the wild given so few plant sources? Are they able to convert it to DHA?

Given so few plant sources(around 6-7) of ALA, how do Apes get ALA in the wild? Are they able to convert it into DHA in satisfactory amounts?
1
vote
0answers
87 views

What kinds of fish tend to have a rapid death after being caught?

I am asking this question because I am trying to make my diet less cruelty-oriented, for this reason this question can be related to trolley problem since I am coping with an ethical problem trying to ...
0
votes
0answers
64 views

Can microbes become “overweight”?

Just out of some weird thoughts, can a microbe (any single-celled organisms, accepting answers for both prokaryotes and eukaryotes) ingest too much food (e.g. via absorbing too much involuntarily ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Is brewer's yeast a good source of protein for humans?

I read that brewer's yeast protein is not a "real protein" and is not usable by non-ruminants. Is that true? If yes, how can I know what kind of protein is good for humans (especially athletes)
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Why are nutrients from food absorbed more efficiently? [duplicate]

It seems to be common knowledge that micronutrients such as vitamins are more easily absorbed by your body when in your diet versus supplements such as pills. I am wondering what the reasons for this ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Which lipoprotein has the highest protein content?

I know that HDLs have the highest protein/lipid ratio but know that the HDLs are very small molecules too and I couldn’t find the exact answer for this question. I mean, by amounts which of these ...
1
vote
0answers
173 views

Which white beans have phosphatidylserine?

Many articles online say that plant foods are poor sources of phosphatidylserine, except for white beans, which have 107 mg per 100 g.¹ ² ⁴ Honestly though, I think they might just be repeating a ...
0
votes
4answers
133 views

Is there any organism that is born with all the nutrients and resources needed for their entire lifetime?

I understand that adult mayflies have no mouth, but they do take in oxygen through openings in their exoskeleton. Is there any organism that does not need to ingest any type of nutrition and does not ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Is the salt obtained from meat (as the primary diet) nutritionally sufficient?

This post is derived from that one, where someone says if you meant salt as a nutrient such as carbs, protein and all, there is salt in the stuff one eats already. The background is "Naked and ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

How many types of bacteria?

Bacteria are classifed on the base of food. Two types of bacteria, autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. Autotrophic bacteria that prepare own food or energy. Heterotrophic which cannot prepare own ...
4
votes
1answer
128 views

Does body absorb nutrients less efficiently if we ingest the same amount at the same time, opposed to spreading over a larger period?

I would like to understand if ingesting a certain amount of nutrients will result in different absorption from my body, depending on whether I ingest that amount spread over time or everything at once....
2
votes
1answer
64 views

Does the arrangement of amino acids in a protein matter for nutrition?

Let's say there are two diets, consisting of entirely different proteins. If you split up all of the proteins from one day of each diet, you'll get the same set of amino acids and the same count of ...
1
vote
1answer
212 views

Are casein proteins in UHT milk digestable for infants or toddlers?

As a novice cheesemaker, I have read that Ultra High Temperature prosessed milk is unsuitable for cheesemaking, as casein proteins are denatured and cannot be curdled with rennet. I have verified that ...
1
vote
2answers
82 views

Does food lose some of its mass in form of energy during metabolism?

I had an argument with someone. I argued that when a cat eats 1 kg of food, the sum of subsequent output (poo + pee + sweat + change of body mass) must be equal to 1 kg. My opponent argued that the ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

What is the percentage of food that goes to a lamb fetus?

Does any one know the percentage of food eaten by a pregnant ewe that goes to the lamb fetus? Specifically how much does the mother take for her body from every one kilo of food and how much does ...
23
votes
1answer
7k views

How can a drink contain 1.8 kcal energy while 0 g fat/carbs/protein?

How is it possible that the Red Bull Zero contains 0 gramms of fat, carbs and protein, but it still has 1.8 kcal of "energy". I always thought that the human body can gain energy only from 3 kinds of ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Why doesn't the soil get depleted after repeated clearing of vegetation?

In my neighborhood, there is a hillside owned and maintained by the local municipality. The hillside is generally overgrown with vegetation. Work crews clear out the vegetation multiple times ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Why do we need to diversify our food sources to live healthy, where other animals live happy on one source?

We read about eating different food to get all vitamins and minerals our body need, and often you find people fail to get the daily amount of a certain thing. I wonder why we humans need to do this ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

What are the bare minimum nutrients required to survive as a human?

I am trying to determine the bare minimum nutritional requirements to survive as a human, ignoring energy (caloric) requirements. Another way to ask this question is: What elements can humans not live ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

What allows grass eaters to digest cellulose?

Scientists are saying that it was a small step for the Panda to move from a meat diet to a grass diet. The article only refers to differences in the Panda's skull, presumably for better chewing. I've ...
4
votes
2answers
174 views

Why are dietary recommendations for methionine consumption combined with cysteine?

I want to understand the amino acids missing in certain vegetables. I looked up the US recommendations for amino acids (source: wikipedia). I don’t understand why they pair Methionine + Cysteine: 25 ...
2
votes
1answer
177 views

Why is exclusive breastfeeding recommended for 6 months only?

The WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of a child's life. Review of evidence has shown that, on a population basis, exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months is the optimal ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Understanding food composition data from USDA for Vitamin A

When researching the nutritional value of carrots the Vitamin A comes in two measurements as RAE and UI: https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/11124?n1=%7BQv%3D1%7D&fgcd=&man=&lfacet=&...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

What is the consensus, if it exists, on the (absence of) biological effects of artificial sweeteners?

I tried to Google (and PubMed) the question, but it seems to be fairly polarized debate and there does not seem to be a consensus as to whether sweeteners like asparatme, acesulfame etc. have ...
2
votes
2answers
317 views

How does zoo and laboratory animal feeding work?

What steps are taken to ensure those animals are fed adequately? When dealing with larger populations of animals, how is it ensured that all of those animals received food during a certain time period,...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

How do people measure how many calories or proteins/fats/сarbohydrates are in some food?

How is the composition (in fats, proteins or carbohydrates) of a certain food estimated and how is the amount of calories provided by the food calculated?
6
votes
1answer
74 views

Why are plants unable to take up Phosphorus directly in their organic form like Phytic Acid?

I am researching acquisition strategies of phosphorus by decidious trees. I am reading a lot that plants take up nutrients as their inorganic form. In the case of P according to literature this is ...
7
votes
1answer
438 views

How does a glucose molecule enter the cell from blood vessel?

The transporters in the plasma membrane of the cells promote the entry of glucose molecules from the extracellular matrix to the cytosol of the cell. Could someone explain how does the nutrient ...
-4
votes
1answer
132 views

Why do ADULTS need protein in their diet, if they are not growing? [duplicate]

Why do ADULTS need protein in their diet, assuming they are not growing? What happens to the amino acids already present in the body? Why don't our bodies conserve them?
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Can supplements affect DNA? (Could 10,000% Methylcobalamin affect MTHFR genotype)

Originally titled "Could B12 supplementation affect dna test results for B12 need?" - B12 just seems like a good example question to frame the more general question of "Can supplements affect DNA?" I ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Why does protein have 4 calories per gram?

As I understand it, protien that isn't used for building and repairing the body is inefficiently converted into glucose in the liver (at a rate of roughly 3 grams of protein per gram of glucose ...
2
votes
0answers
72 views

Glycogen replenishment after exercise

In the body, the liver holds between 90-110 grams of glycogen in storage, while skeletal muscle storage makes up another 400 grams. If a person exercises and depletes both stores, when a carbohydrate ...
2
votes
1answer
298 views

How is the urea cycle regulated with respect to protein deficit?

Proteins cannot be stored in the body. Excess proteins from the diet are deaminated in the urea cycle that takes place in the liver. The liver is the first contact since these amino acids are ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Why does drinking milk lead to increased fractures?

Milk has always been associated with strong bones due to the high amount of protein and calcium in it. Yet reading it up on wikipedia, A study published in The BMJ that followed more than 45,000 ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

Is this answer about the limiting factor correct?

The graph shows the result of adding both phosphorus and nitrogen to different algae populations. I have a hard time figuring out why the correct answer is C, I thought that groups 4 and 5 would have ...
-1
votes
1answer
164 views

Where different types of proteins can be found in food?

According to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSKPgaSGSYA (created by one of the largest supermarket chains in the UK), different proteins have different roles in human body: (Group 1) They’re like ...
3
votes
3answers
97 views

How big is a baby's stomach?

There is a lot of contradictory information on baby feeding volumes on the internet. A common claim is that a baby's stomach is the size of a hazelnut or small marble, with a volume of 5-7 ml. But ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

sweet receptor's affect on insulin release

So I understand the basics of how the body releases insulin to keep blood glucose levels in check and (loosely) that higher insulin levels can lead to more (or at a faster rate) glucose being stored ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there a standard way of measuring culture nutrient levels in real time?

I am working on optimizing growth rates for a culture, and one thing I'm trying to monitor is nutrient consumption rates to pinpoint any bottlenecks, i.e. the culture goes through all the calcium in a ...
2
votes
0answers
89 views

Is biotin a hapten? If so, how does it work as a hapten in the human body?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hapten Hapten's aren't synonymous with allergens. It is defined as a foreign molecule that can bind to an antibody but does not evoke an immune response unless combined ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Ingestion of cellulose digesting prokaryotes? [duplicate]

If humans digest cellulose digesting prokaryotes, can we start digesting cellulose like cows?
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Carbohydrate diet and dental health

I read that human started carbohydrates rich diet after adopting agriculture before that meat was main energy source which has comparatively less carbohydrate. High carbohydrate started destroying ...
1
vote
1answer
463 views

Where do kombucha SCOBYs get nitrogen?

Kombucha can be brewed even with tiny amounts of inocculate, such as the little bit of sediment at the bottom of store-bought kombuchas. Over 1-2 weeks, this can grow into an inch thick film covering ...