Questions tagged [pathology]

The study of diseases, including their causes and effects.

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Portal hypertension

"Portal hypertension is more frequent and manifests in more complex ways in chronic liver failure than in acute liver failure (Fig. 14.7). It stems from increased vascular resistance coupled with ...
Drita Raci's user avatar
1 vote
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Does aerobic exercise increase the incidence of disease via free radicals?

Aerobic respiration produces ROS, atleast one of which (the hydroxyl radical) cannot be neutralized by any known antioxidant and is always damaging surrounding tissue. I know ROS plays a role in ...
Samid's user avatar
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Do humans produce an immune response to their own antibodies?

As far as I know, T and B cells form a part of the adaptive immune response in humans. In their early stages, these cells undergo genetic recombination to produce a diversity of antigen receptors/...
Bruno. T's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
44 views

Prevention of disease spreading in animal kingdom

It's my first question on here, so I'm not sure If my question fits the theme. Please refer me to the appropriate one, If I have made a mistake. So a question that I wanted to ask has to do with ...
Đumić Branislav's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
299 views

Can plants be pathogenic towards humans?

In googling this question you’ll only find articles about plant pathogens jumping over to humans eg candida auris and pseudomonas aeruginosa. My question is, like fungi can be infectious to humans (...
imrobert's user avatar
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What diseases affect small arteries similar to atherosclerosis in aorta?

I have read about artherosclerosis and I understand that it is a phenomenon caused by external lipidic cells coming into the body and creating a plaque that, when it breaks, will obstruct the artery. ...
totalMongot's user avatar
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0 answers
31 views

Are there autoimmune disorders caused or mediated only by T cells?

I have frequently read that 'most' or 'the vast majority' of autoimmune disorders involving the adaptive immune system are caused by autoantibodies. These comments imply that there are known disorders ...
Kurt Hikes's user avatar
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30 views

How does one prove that a particular bacterium causes a disease if we've found it in the blood of all infected people?

Let's say we have a new disease and are trying to identify the cause. We isolate, though culture, a new microbe from the blood of all infected people. Is it enough to say that it isn't present in ...
user73107's user avatar
13 votes
1 answer
841 views

Does the recent concern over several papers about Aβ*56 call into question the association of Alzheimers Disease with any amyloyd beta oligomer forms?

The news item by Charles Piller just published in Science BLOTS ON A FIELD? A neuroscience image sleuth finds signs of fabrication in scores of Alzheimer’s articles, threatening a reigning theory of ...
uhoh's user avatar
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What is the conjugation capacity of the liver?

Our liver conjugates 250-300 mg bilirubin per day under normal circumstances but it is capable of conjugating much more. What is the upper end per day after which it won’t be able to conjugate leading ...
Aman Karimi's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
72 views

How do predators avoid "food poisoning"?

How do predators avoid becoming ill in cholera, diarrhoea, dysentery and similar diseases? They aren't exactly careful when eating a kill, especially pack animals where there can be quite a fight over ...
d-b's user avatar
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What are the different factors involved in ageing?

This is a big edit of the previous question Thanks to first comments and answers of the previous question, here is a more specific question: An organism faces ageing. This ageing is linked with ...
totalMongot's user avatar
1 vote
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Phenotype of a possible gene mutation

I have noticed multiple cases where patients had similar body characteristics : decreased ability to gain weight (slim) they are capable of sleep only 6 hours or less with normal functioning (...
mohamed's user avatar
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0 answers
76 views

How does Propionibacterium acnes survive the antibacterial effects of sebum?

Sebum has antibacterial properties due to sapienic acid and oleic acid according to this article on sebum. According to the same article, desaturation of fatty acids increases acne development. ...
green onion's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
70 views

How typhoid fever severe case's intestine perforation occur? (non trauma)

In typhoid severe case, intestinal perforation occurs. As stated here [4, 6]. Intestinal perforation is a serious complication of typhoid fever My question here is, how does the bacteria (Salmonella ...
Cerebral cortex 's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
67 views

Is unihibited exhalation beneficial for someone with a contagious respiratory disease?

If someone has a contagious respiratory disease (I'll refer to as CRD - eg. COVID, FLU, etc.) I'm wondering if the process of exhaling could be beneficial for them. My first thought is that exhaling ...
Yehosef's user avatar
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1 vote
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Monogenic disorders vs multifactorial inheritance disorders

There's a condition called SYNGAP1-related intellectual disability which is caused by mutations to the SYNGAP1 gene. I believe that this is called a monogenic disorder, while disorders that are caused ...
Derek H's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
110 views

Can enzymes be externally administered?

I was reading about Tay Sachs disease - it is essentially the deficiency of the enzyme hexosaminidase. Why can't the disease be treated by administering the enzyme (prepared artificially/extracted ...
raavee's user avatar
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Vitamin B12 deficiency Megaloblastic anemic

I have two doubts regarding Megaloblastic anemia which shakes my mind (1) first is- I know that vitamin B12 is required for thymidine synthesis which is further required for DNA synthesis and so if ...
Rahul Dhillon's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
255 views

Longevity and extent of transfection after SARS-COV-2 vaccination with Janssen

The Johnson vaccine, unlike the RNA vaccines from Pfizer & Moderna, uses a vector containing DNA encoding for the SARS-COV-2 spike protein. This vector DNA needs to enter the cell, allowing for ...
AliceD's user avatar
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Pathological mechanisms in asthma

What is known about the precise molecular mechanisms involved in asthma? For instance, is it known why the bronchi tissue alteration cannot be reversed? Were any new mechanisms discovered in the ...
huurd's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
283 views

Why there aren't any pandemic diseases by prions?

Learning biology in school, I became interested in the fact that there aren't any diseases by prions which are globally infectious (as far as I know), unlike diseases by viruses (ex. COVID-19, SARS ...
kihoon's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
96 views

Is it possible to use PCR to test for Machado-Joseph disease?

Machado–Joseph disease (MJD) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disease that is caused by a mutation in the gene ATXN3. The protein encoded by this gene contains "CAG" repeats in the coding ...
Nova's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
133 views

Does the false positive covid-19 PCR % referred to by Surkova & Nikolayevskyy in The Lancet mean % of all tests, or % of positive tests?

In False-positive COVID-19 results: hidden problems and costs it is said: The current rate of operational false-positive swab tests in the UK is unknown; preliminary estimates show it could be ...
Fiksdal's user avatar
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1 answer
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How are vaccines mass-produced?

I have a background in product design and so am familiar with with how most things are mass-produced — food, machines, etc. But I've been able to find very little information on how vaccines are mass-...
RobertAKARobin's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
91 views

Can you recognize this larvae that came from a human nose? (probable nasal myiasis?

Those larvae came at least four different times from the nose (inside - from the mucosal) of a 60 year old man from a tropical area in South America. He lives and works in a city with a tropical ...
MPPV's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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In terms of Prions is there a possibility, that other proteins apart from PRPC could be misfolded [closed]

This is as from research PRPC seems to be the cause of all Prion related diseases. Thank you
Haris Mohammad's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
38 views

How good are the hematologic parameters (e,g, IL6 or others) in predicting which patients will develop a severe COVID-19 disease?

Clinical implications of the hematologic profile of COVID-19 patients including cytokine storm, coagulation profile and thrombophilic complications are starting to be recognized. Hypercoagulability ...
Octo's user avatar
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0 answers
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Why does touch the face make more likely to be infected?

Why is it risky to touch the face although there is no direct contact with into the nose, eyes and mouth? Is there any possibility that pathogens infect us from our facial skin? Suppose we have ...
Uğur Eren's user avatar
15 votes
1 answer
3k views

Why do diseases in the tap water of developing countries affect people from developed countries more?

My siblings and I went abroad to a country that doesn't have drinkable tap water, but we did not know this at the time as the people who lived there used to drink it all the time with no issues. One ...
James's user avatar
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26 votes
1 answer
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Specific mechanism behind lethality of yellow coat color in mice

Our high school genetics chapter has some extra information about L.Cuenot. It only covered his research, and the fact that mice homozygous for yellow coat color would die before birth. It was an ...
Amarylis Vaselaar's user avatar
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0 answers
24 views

Are there any examples of viruses that have jumped from reptile to human?

I know that there are plenty of examples of zoonosis occurring from reptiles to humans that involve bacterial pathogens, (e.g. Salmonella) but are there any instances of viruses being transferred from ...
nellapizza's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
840 views

Converting from RU/ML to AEU/ML

I'd like to know whether it is possible to convert from RU/ml to AEU/ml. I work in the ELISA department in our laboratory. We need to validate some kits by comparing results between our lab and ...
Mhleli's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
37 views

With the 5$ covid19 test - an antigen test - , would trials (most likely) be independent?

Actual question What would typically cause antigen tests to give a false positive or false negative and would these causes be typically independent (if we run the test twice it won't automatically ...
David Mulder's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
59 views

Can birds pass diseases to humans through contact surfaces?

My friend asked me the following question. She has a pigeon nesting on her window and the pigeon often touches the window, and my friend also sometimes touches the window (e.g. open and close it). The ...
Triceratops's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
99 views

Are “tremors” and “ tetanic contractions” the same thing?

Do these two expressions have the same meaning? 1- Tetanic contractions in the skeletal muscles 2- Rythmic shaking of the hands (These two expressions are supposed to be two symptoms of Parkinson’s ...
user261947's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
87 views

If Covid antibodies disappear after 2-3 months, will a vaccine still be effective?

It looks like there have been studies in China and also in Spain that suggest antibodies don't last very long or could disappear after some time. What does this mean for the effectiveness of a ...
iamjane's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
88 views

Could there be a pathogen which does not activate an immune response?

In order for the immune system to be stimulated to produce antibodies, there must be a surface protein of the invading pathogen which binds to a receptor on B cell surface somewhat loosely. We need ...
Meep's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
68 views

How can I obtain a uniform bacterial sample?

I'm currently doing a research project wherein I will be testing the antibiotic resistance of a bacterial sample. Due to a risk of contamination during transport, I'm not allowed to request a uniform ...
Ali's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
280 views

How is minimum infectious dose defined?

I'm a bit confused by the concept of a minimum infectious dose (MID). It seems from what my research so far has turned up, that while any dose greater than 0 could potentially cause an infection, for ...
Michael Fenwick's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
725 views

Why are men more susceptible to severe COVID-19?

It seems that globally, men are more susceptible to severe COVID-19 than women: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/26/men-are-much-more-likely-to-die-from-coronavirus-but-why This is seen in ...
johnO's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
26 views

How can poliovirus and other pathogens lead to permanent conditions if the bodies adaptive immune system is still functioning? [closed]

Wont the lymphatic system eventually create antibodies that completely eliminate the virus in the body?
Simon Martin's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is the cause of a protuberant belly in kwashiorkor?

Kwashiorkor is a PEM (Protein–energy malnutrition) usually characterised by a pot belly. Why is there a pot belly in the case of a malnutrition? I have found contradictory reasons. This paper says ...
Bipasha's user avatar
  • 954
1 vote
1 answer
894 views

What is the principle behind Microagglutination test (MAT)?

Could some one please help me understand the principle behind the MAT. Also, is it only used to detect leptospira or can it be used to detect other pathogens as well? Kindly share links to papers if ...
Carica Rubus's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
51 views

Edema and hydrostatic pressure

I'm currently studying Robbins basic pathology, and I'm confused about a specific statement: It states in the book that when hydrostatic pressure is low due to a lack of albumin synthesis, it leads ...
Kudo Anastasia's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
63 views

How a pathologist would analyse this H&E image?

I am working on a project which involves writing computer software to analyse histological images. A typical image looks like this: It is a Hematoxylin and Eosin stained biopsy of breast cancer ...
mercury0114's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
91 views

Can far-UVC light be safely used as germicide? (help understanding a paper)

I've been trying to familiarize myself with the literature on far UVC light as a germicide. My question mostly pertains to figure 4 of this paper. The paper investigates the efficacy of 207 nm light ...
aTree's user avatar
  • 143
3 votes
1 answer
199 views

What differentiates diseases like Covid-19 and Polio from the common cold

Why are vaccines required for our body's immune system to destroy viruses that cause the likes of Covid-19 or Polio, while viruses that cause the common-cold are self-limiting (go away on their own)? ...
jyp11711's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
71 views

Are there any diseases that can harm and kill flies and mosquitoes? [closed]

For decades I have heard about how flies and mosquitoes carry diseases around and infect humans and indirectly kill them in mass numbers. Somehow these diseases do not appear to harm these insects, I ...
quantum231's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is COVID-19 claimed to get less deadly over time? If so, why?

From a TV news report of a press conference from (I think) the German Robert Koch Institute, I remember hearing an expert declare that he was expecting COVID-19 to get less deadly over time. ...
gerrit's user avatar
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