Questions tagged [pharmacology]

Pharmacology is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function.

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60 views

What are necessary parameters for a tissue scaffold to be biodegradable?`

I am a mechanical engineer with little biological experience, but I have recently been looking at tissue scaffoldings. My current understanding is as follows, but may be flawed. I would appreciate ...
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154 views

If D1 receptors stimulate adenylate cyclase (through GPCRs) and D2 receptors inhibit it, then why do mutations in both have similar effects?

D1 and D2 both refer to specific types of dopamine receptors. I'm sure it has something to do with the fact that the D1 receptors are in regions different from D2 receptors. I know that adenylate ...
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112 views

How does taking drugs speed up the development of drug resistant or viruses?

First, here is what I know: Some infectious illnesses, such as HIV or Hepatitis B, can be treated with the help of some drugs. The problem is that the virus sometimes undergoes mutations which grant ...
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1answer
2k views

What constitutes FDA's First in Class designation for New Molecular Entities?

What constitutes a First in Class designation for new molecular entities? I've seen this term on FDA documents, as well as in databases (Chembl for example), but I was curious if there are any set ...
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318 views

How does glucose delivered intraperitoneal (i.p.) get into the peripheral circulation?

Intraperitoneal delivery of drugs or fluids is something that occurs much more frequently in veterinary medicine than clinical medicine. In veterinary medicine or scientific studies using animals, ...
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What determines if a compound is primarily uptaken by the lymphatic extensions rather than the portal vein blood supply in villi of the intestine?

I am currently studying the intestinal absorption/transport systems, but confused about one part specifically. There are hydrophilic and lipophilic compounds (to varying degrees), and they get ...
2
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27 views

A question about dicumarol

I know that dicumarol was discovered in moldy sweet clover as it caused hemorrhage in cattles, but if someone had thromboembolic disorders causing uncontrolled thrombosis,would it be fine to eat moldy ...
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2answers
236 views

Is it true that ethanol can have some positive effects?

I recently was reading this inforgrafics about excessive alcohol use. It is written: No one should begin drinking or drink more frequently based on potential health benefits I am surprised. Is ...
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53 views

Pharmacokinetics and cell-membrane permeability of Adenosine triphosphate disodium hydrate

【My Question】 (1) Please tell me the pharmacokinetics of this ATP (or Adenosine triphosphate disodium hydrate) when it is administered orally or intravenously. In particular, Does this material has ...
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362 views

What's the difference between veterinary and human snake antivenom?

Recently, out of curiosity, I looked online if snake antivenom for humans were actually sold for individuals. I found out they aren't. Not only that, but bills can get really high on countries that ...
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58 views

Could certain drugs enable one to consistently eat above TDEE or BMR without fat gains?

I heard anabolic steroids and stuff like DNP and ephedrine and etc. can somewhat enable one to eat more and get away with it without much or any fat gain, despite eating more than the body would ...
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60 views

Hematuria due to Nitric Oxide

Drug interactions between properly dosed NO and other medications are not expected, but side effects may include noisy breathing, hematuria, or possibly atelectasis. (pg.no:577; Goodman and Gilman ...
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463 views

Why do new atypical antipsychotics like Zyprexa cause TD at lower rates?

When the d2 receptors are blocked for long periods of time they tend to up regulate. This is what causes tardive dyskinesia. Why do the newer atypical anti psychotics cause such at a lower rate? ...
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59 views

What happens to the brain during meditation?

I've read several experiments on the internet according to which it is possible to reach a psychedelic state without taking any psychedelic drugs like DMT, LSD and other tryptamine derivatives. It ...
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746 views

Drugs with unknown mechanism of action

I want to get a list of FDA-approved drugs with unknown mechanism of action. I think that there should be a database where for each drug there is a short field "mechanism", but I haven't find one. Do ...
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42 views

How do organoarsenics improve digestion efficiency in poultry?

It struck me as very surprising that these organoarsenic compound with structure looking not very compatible with living system is widely used as food additive to increase weight gain and improve food ...
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75 views

Genotype-Phenotype databases?

Beyond the Stanford HIV database, what other databases out there provide a dataset linking virus/bacterial genotype to quantitative phenotype? I'm looking for high quality datasets to test machine ...
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86 views

Birth control hormones in the water? Or not?

This prior question talks about natural estrogen (TL;DR: Months to years): How quickly do estrogens break down in the environment? Ref: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/485441a A lot of media has said, "...
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24 views

Source of journals collecting titles of scientific publications regarding clinical trials with dogs fed medicinal herbs

After some time researching on the web, you can find a lot of websites telling you that some herbs may have or have specific properties(unfortunately most seem to be "advertised" as if they were ...
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66 views

Why is there only adrenoreceptors and no active adrenergic innervation in bronchus and uterus?

Our bronchus and uterus has beta adrenoreceptors, but they have no active sympathetic nervous system innervation in these organs. Was there a sympathetic innervation in trachea and uterus, earlier, ...
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4k views

What are potential side effects of myostatin inhibitors?

Myostatin inhibitors, which are being developed to treat muscle wasting diseases like muscular dystrophy, are likely to be abused by athletes. What are the potential long-term side-effects of taking a ...
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113 views

What's the Efficacy of Ampakines in the Treatment for ADHD?

What's the Efficacy of Ampakines in the Treatment for ADHD? Ampakines are a class of drugs that serve as potentiators of the AMPA glutamate receptor. By so doing they serve as nootropic, anxiolytics ...
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29 views

Is it advised to calculate QED parameters for salts?

QED (quantitative estimation of drug-likeness) is a score which helps you to predict if a small molecule is desirable as an orally absorbed drug, described in the Quantifying the chemical beauty of ...
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17 views

If blood vessels mostly aren't supplied by parasympathetic nerves, how effects through M3-ACh receptors are mediated?

Blood vessels throughout the body mostly aren't supplied by any parasympathetic fibres. But the effects of ACh through M3-ACh receptors would infact release NO (which acts on VSM and causes ...
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33 views

Why does warfarin decrease biological activity of protein C?

Warfarin inhibits VKOR. Hence it disrupts vitamin K dependent $\gamma$-carboxylation of Fc- II, VII, IX, X. But what exactly it does to Protein C and Protein S? How does it also affect anticoagulant ...
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Can you find the mass of drug X remaining in the body after an oral dose with only bioavailability and half-life?

I'm reviewing this question and think you can't find the answer with the information given. A patient receives 1g of drug X as a single oral dose. Drug X has a half-life of 12 hours and an oral ...
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23 views

How exactly does chemotherapy cause anemia?

I’ve been trying to figure this out for the past few hours but I still can’t find something as in depth as I’m looking for. So far all I’ve found is that chemo drugs kill bone marrow cells and some ...
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18 views

how does acetic acid induce pain?

how does acetic acid induce pain? I am finding the whole mechanism of it but cannot find any papers or writings. please help. If you have links that would be nice too.
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71 views

Is this trial that reversed aging in humans worth taking seriously?

In September 2019 Fahy et al. published results from the TRIIM (Thymus Regeneration, Immunorestoration, and Insulin Mitigation) trial. Their stated goals were to investigate whether they could restore ...
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69 views

What disposition means in the context of registering clinical studies?

I was diving into the AACT database, and in the studies table I had noticed some columns containing the term disposition such as: ...
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41 views

What is the relevance of the constant in the clearance equation?

I have seen the equation for drug half lives described variously as (0.7xVd)/Cl, (0.693xVd)/Cl, and (ln2xVd)/Cl. What is the origin of this numerical constant in the numerator? What does it signify?
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37 views

Why do some texts say that noncompetitive antagonist dose no change in ED50 of agonist in Dose-respond curve?

Competitive antagonists increase the ED50 while the Emax remains the same. Non-competitive antagonists do not change the ED50 while decreases the Emax. I wonder how does this happen as Non-...
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38 views

What physiological pathways lie behind inhalants hallucinogenic effect?

I searched through the web and surprisingly I found pretty much nothing on the physiology of hallucinogenic effects of inhalants. Any idea how people get high with inhalants (household and industrial ...
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71 views

Do antimuscarinic drugs increase cAMP or cGMP

Activation of muscarinic receptors M2 and M4 inhibits adenylate cyclase which reduces cAMP levels. It would be expected that antimuscarinics such as ipratropium would increase cAMP levels. However, ...
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89 views

How does alcohol interact with sympathomimetics to affect the cardiovascular system?

There is a fair amount of information on the cardiovascular effects of alcohol, and of sympathomimetics. How do they work? And how do their mechanisms interact? We know that similar pathologies ...
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36 views

What exactly causes SSRIs, SNRIs, and tricyclics to induce akathisia?

Such as too high neurotransmitter levels (serotonin/dopamine/other) or the method of drug delivery or some other reason? Please keep in mind I know very little about this subject, I apologize for the ...
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34 views

What are some good examples of open-source articles in which the synergy of two medicines is demonstrated?

I am doing research on Stochastic Cooperative Game Theory (a subfield in mathematics), which I will henceforth call SCGT for convenience. In this theory, entities can work together to receive a bigger ...
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75 views

Physiological Effect of Mannitol

Which Starling Force is affected by Mannitol? I am either thinking hydrostatic pressure of interstitial fluid (because it increases interstitial fluid volume) or hydrostatic pressure of capillary (...
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131 views

Why was the intramuscular route selected for palivizumab administration to infants, instead of the subcutaneous route?

The majority of monoclonal antibodies administered by an extravascular route to adults are administered subcutaneously. Does anyone know or have hypotheses about the reasoning behind why palivizumab ...
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34 views

Can one refer to pieces of proteins produced by enzymatic digestion as "enzymatic lysates"?

A Russian text I'm translating says this: The location of post-translational modification (PTM) sites was determined using the “bottom-up” approach commonly used in this field. In accordance with ...
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23 views

Multi-protein drug treatments

Apologies if this an obvious question - I am very new to this. I am, as of now, under the impression that multiple SNP variations interact to create multiple mutated proteins, which ultimately results ...
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63 views

Is 7-nitroindazole neuroprotective against meth because it oxidizes peroxynitrate?

So 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) prevents methamphetamine (METH) induced neurotoxicity AND completely prevents meth induced dopamine depletion, but doesn't prevent meth induced hyperthermia. Strangely, a ...
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64 views

Generating all possible conformations of an Intrinsically disordered protein

I want to simulate interaction between the bHLH-LZ domain of c-Myc encoded protein and a test ligand. Since the domain is intrinsically disordered, I want to generate all possible conformations of the ...
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186 views

Why is RAS undruggable?

Why can't mutated RAS get inactivated by GTPase? Why don't we have any inhibitors for RAS-GTP binding? Why is RAS undruggable? How can mutated RAS be inactivated? I had been researching on the topic ...
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173 views

How does having an empty stomach affect absorption of compounds?

From personal experience, compounds such as nicotine, caffeine and alchohol appear to absorb much quicker into the blood on an 'empty' stomach', or after extended periods of fasting. If this is the ...
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48 views

Can I explain the kinetics of a ligand looking at the ligand-protein co-structure?

Can I explain the kinetics of a ligand binding to a target protein (association and dissociation rates) by looking at the protein-ligand co-structure? Editing my question after a few comments: I ...
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4k views

IC50 and area under the curve

I was hoping to get some clarification on how drug response data (i.e. IC50) are presented. On publicly available datasets like Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer, area under the curve (AUC) ...
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74 views

Imidazoline receptor agonist in clonidine?

I am thinking which pathway is more important in hypertension, ADHD and withdrawal of clonidine: alpha-2 agonist imidazoline receptor agonist (maybe) Alpha-2 is the classical one. Pubchem starts to ...
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2k views

negatively charged albumin as major carrier of acidic/negative charged drugs in blood

I reading that orsomucoid (alpha-1-acid glycoprotein) is the major carrier of positively charged (basic) drugs in the blood, while albumin carries negatively charged (acidic) and drugs with neutral ...
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323 views

Why can't sodium butyrate be delivered orally in humans and other mammals?

I think I know why -- bioavailability problems but since I have no firm evidence to support this theory I thought I would ask the biology stackexchange community for their input. I'd like some firm ...