Questions tagged [plant-anatomy]

The study of the form and internal structures of plants.

50 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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4
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4answers
1k views

Stomata during night (respiration)

How does carbon dioxide from respiration diffuse out of the leaf during the night? Do stomata close completely during night?
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0answers
137 views

Is this pollen?

The small round "pockets/buns" in the image. I am almost sure it is, but maybe someone knows more. Sample comes from (50.156992, 12.532546) (Google coordinates). It is a re-cultivated tailing in the ...
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0answers
376 views

Aloe species identification

I am trying to find out which species these are. Someone claimed they were Aloe Vera, but I am skeptical as I have never seen Aloe Vera with that kind of growth. These look more like Aloe Juvenna to ...
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0answers
998 views

Pits and Pores in Vascular Tissue

What purpose is served by the pits and pores in xylem and phloem cells? I cant find what purpose that these components serve in the vascular tissues in plants
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381 views

Why are trichomes important for both the roots and shoots of plants?

In what ways are trichomes vital to the plant? Why have them on the plant shoots as well?
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0answers
186 views

Why roots have radial vascular bundles while stems have conjoint?

Why not the whole plant has the same arrangement of vascular bundle, why there is a difference of arrangement in roots and stems (radial in root and conjoint in stem) , what is the purpose of this ...
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0answers
49 views

What are the microscopic mechanisms of plant branching?

For a long time I've been idly interested in how the shape of a complex organism gets determined during development at a microscopic level. Recently I've realized that plants could be a good place to ...
3
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0answers
23 views

Why do certain ferns have roughened spore surface?

Ferns such as Anemia phyllitidis, Blotiella lindeniana, Ctenitis hirta, Cystopterix fragilis, Hemionitis palmata and many others have roughened splity spore surface. I ask, why is it evolutionary so?...
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48 views

Names for the degrees for symptoms from drought (or other damage) done to trees

Looking out my window, I see trees suffering from drought. I once knew the name for the degrees visible, but I have forgotten and can't find it on the net. Attempt at describing "level of dryness" ...
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0answers
34 views

Why plant tissues end in -enchyma?

Many plant tissue types end in the affix -enchyma. Etymology: enkhyma "infusion," from en- "in" + khein "to pour" Examples are parenchyma, collenchyma, and sclerenchyma (meaning "to pour beside," ...
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24 views

Why does the iron content differ in different species on seeds?

Iron can be affected by pH of the soil but why does each species actually have a different iron content. What causes it? What genes cause it?
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0answers
107 views

Mint twisted like a spiral

My friend has a mint plant with a spiral-shaped stem, and the leaves are positioned like this: Why could such deformation happen? Other mint plants, growing in the same pot, are normal.
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0answers
28 views

What is a 1-flowered raceme?

PlantNET describes the inflorescences of Daviesia acicularis as: Racemes reduced to 1 flower How is a 1-flowered raceme different from a single flower?
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63 views

What attaches plant cells to the cell wall?

In animal cells integrins span the plasma membrane and attach the cell membrane to the extracellular matrix. I was wondering how are plant cells attached to the cell wall? Is it just the middle ...
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0answers
26 views

Where would the majority of the Indoleacetic acid (IAA) be in the shoot and what would the effect be?

If I propose that a plant is 2D and then a light source was shone on both horizontal side of the shoot, in which direction would positive phototropism occur (or would positive phototropism occur at ...
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0answers
1k views

Is it possible to simulate the effects of high altitudes for plants?

Note- I considered asking this on gardening.stackexchange.com but i believe it is better suited for this site since it deals with more complicated material. As I understand it, certain plants (...
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0answers
94 views

Why do conker flowers grow upwards?

Most trees I know that have their flowers in groups hang these groups down. I noticed, however, that conker flowers grow upwards! I guess that growing against gravity requires special effort, so ...
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0answers
19 views

Near-zero water loss in a closed hydroponics system?

I know there are a lot of factors that would impact this... Plant type. Plant neediness (i.e., even sibling plants will possess different needs, defects, etc). Automation efficiency. Water & ...
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0answers
171 views

Does the Histogen Theory apply to plant roots as well as stems?

My school textbook briefly mentions a certain "Histogen Theory" (von Hanstein) of plant growth/development. However, I can't find any authoritative source on this matter online. According to my book, ...
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0answers
813 views

Location of male and female reproductive organs in fern (prothallus)

I can't seem to find an authoritative answer to this anywhere else online. Basically, my school text-book says the antheridium (male organ) is located on the lower surface of the fern prothallus and ...
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0answers
86 views

How exactly does a plant know where water and light are?

I actually researched on this, but nothing was found regarding this. The only thing I found is that auxins grow on the farthest side causing it to elongate. Yes, but how exactly do the plants know ...
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0answers
110 views

What type of subsoil root structure provides better plant anchorage?

Which type of root is better for good anchorage for small plants: tap roots or fibrous roots?. How about for trees: tap root or a fibrous system?
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0answers
894 views

Why does spiral or annular thickening occur in water conducting plant vessels?

From what I behold, spiral and annular thickening of xylem and trachied cell walls leaves a lot of not thickened regions of cell wall. Lignin is the material which prevents water from escaping these ...
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0answers
108 views

Separation of sister chromatids diring anaphase without Centrosomes in plant cell during mitosis

As in animal cell during mitosis sister chromatids are separated from each other during Anaphase by the pulling of kinetochore fibers toward their originating poles of centrosomes but as we know that ...
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0answers
109 views

How does P-protein (phloem) help in sealing of wounds?

While I was reading a book I found that "P-proteins in the sieve elements of phloem help in sealing of wounds along with callose". So how does p-protein do that, moreover how can it reach to other ...
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0answers
169 views

Botany -What are the main differences between tubers and primary roots?

What are the criteria to differ a tuber, from a primary root? As I am not a botanist, I would say that the main differences I recognize: Roots contain some unique receptors like B12 receptors. ...
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0answers
113 views

Moss CO2 consumption

I wish to calculate how much CO2 would a sq m of moss fixes to glucose in one day, taking about 20 degrees C average temperature, 55% humidity and a regular 8 hour day. Water and nutrients are at ...
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0answers
44 views

Can epiphyte share nutrient to host plant?

Sometimes plant share their nutrient with underground root network But if there are plant that grow on other tree. Is it possible that it would merge into another tree and sharing resource. I mean ...
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0answers
497 views

Why is it easy to separate the cotton wool from the roots of young plants grown in cotton?

In my book it is said that if we grow Maize and Gram seeds in wet cotton, after the seeds are sprouted it is easy to separate the cotton wool from the roots of young plants. My question is why is it ...
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0answers
279 views

Monocot stele in roots

Why do monocots have eustele in the roots instead of protostele like dicots? I thought the roots don't need the strength of eustele because the roots are supported by the soil. So what is the ...
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0answers
532 views

why monocot roots have a wide pith while dicot roots have a narrow pith?

Normally dicot roots have a nartow pith at the center but monocot roots have a wide pith. Is there any specific reason to this?
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0answers
720 views

Measuring a plant's electric activity any instructions where to place electrodes?

I would like to measure a plant's electric activity / voltage, I've looked online to find out where to place the electrodes and what type of electrodes to use but they seem to very wildly. Any ideas? ...
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0answers
88 views

Location of embryo development in angiosperms

What floral organ does the development of the embryos of angiosperms occurs in? Is it the ovary? The pollen tube grows down through the style and double fertilization occurs and the embryo begins to ...
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0answers
87 views

What are the white spots?

What are these white spots? It's like Braille writing or something. How is the appearance encoded in the plant? (which I think is a Pine, though I am not sure).
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0answers
79 views

Root hair formation in Arabidopsis

In arabidopsis, 2 cell types arise in the root epidermis : root hair cells and hairless epidermal cells. The immature epidermal cells that are in contact with 2 underlying cells of root cortex ...
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1answer
2k views

Reason for aquatic plant roots

My question is about why aquatic plants have roots. At first they seem a bit superfluous to me because leaves of the plants could just absorb nutrients directly from the water thereby skipping a need ...
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1answer
765 views

How do roots absorb water instead of presence of waxy - material suberin in the form of casparian strips on the wall of endodermis?

I found that in the endodermis, the tangential and radial walls have deposition of the waxy, and hence water-impermeable, material suberin in the form of casparian strips. The endodermis comes before ...
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0answers
12 views

What is the accepted theory of root and shoot apical meristem organization?

I learned many theories of root and shoot apical organization. Histogen theory, Haberlandt's division of eumeristem, Tunica corpus theory and cyto histological zonnation theory. But which is the ...
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0answers
16 views

Apoplast pathway, down a water potential gradient or not?

So, I was doing a AS level MCQ, the question tells us that water passes across the leaf tissues by different routes as a result of 1) differences in water potential 2) the pull transmitted by ...
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0answers
11 views

How do phloems have diffuse solids?

If phloems transport mainly sucrose and not water, then how does a phloem cell diffuse sugars up and down the structure?
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0answers
14 views

Pits, symplastic or apoplastic pathway?

After water has moved through the endodermis through the Casparian Strip, water continues to move down the water potential gradient into the xylem vessels through the pits, is movement through the ...
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0answers
8 views

How long can cytoplasmic streaming be in an isolated leaf?

Here is an interesting video demonstrating the effect of cytoplasmic streaming: cytoplasmic_streaming of a leaf We see the leaf has been isolated from its original body. I wonder how long can this ...
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0answers
95 views

What is the difference between pits and perforations in xylem?

What is the difference between pits and perforations in tracheids and vessel elements? Based on the diagram in this website, are they both simply holes? If so aren't pits and perforations (or pores) ...
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0answers
3 views

solute potential of guard cells in stomata increases with glucose but not with starch

In sugar starch theory and potassium ion inflow theory the solute or osmotic potential increases with glucose, in guard cells but not with starch why? The same case is with malic acid i-e the solute ...
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0answers
13 views

How does salt content affect flowering of halophyte?

My teacher told me that one adaptation of halophyte is that they flower at specific time e.g. rainy season to reduce salt exposure (as salt content affects flowering of plant thus affect the ...
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1answer
69 views

plant crossing for creating breeding population

I read some material about plant breeding. For a self-incompatible plant with high heterozygosity, it said that after selecting the plant population based on phenotype/desired trait, a cross was done ...
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0answers
139 views

What is the molecule responsible of the yellow color of the Agave americana?

Does anybody know what is the molecule responsible of the yellow color at the edges of this plant? I noticed also that the new forming yellow part at the begging stage is soft green until it is ...
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0answers
165 views

How does an increase in CO2 concentration affect Photosynthesis and Transpiration

I noticed a strange thing in my book. At one place it says that an increase in CO$_2$ concentration in the outside air decreases the rate of transpiration but at the other place it says that an ...
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0answers
15 views

What is the fuzzy growth or plant on the side of buildings and on the grounds in Cozumel Mexico?

I recently visited Cozumel Mexico and saw this furry growth on the grounds as well as on a 5,000 year old building. I was wondering if anyone could help me as of what it is? I have looked it up but ...
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1answer
93 views

Please identify this plant

I don't know anything about plants