Questions tagged [plant-anatomy]

The study of the form and internal structures of plants.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
20
votes
5answers
5k views

What determines the spiral direction of plants?

Some plants and vines spiral clockwise as they go along (right direction) and some spiral anticlockwise (left direction). What determines which direction they spiral along? At first, I believed it to ...
15
votes
2answers
16k views

Is this a grass cell?

I found this picture online claiming it was a grass cell. Clearly it is a cross section image but I was hoping you could tell me if this is actually grass, or something else if anything.
13
votes
2answers
5k views

Using anatomical terms for human organs and parts of plants

I know how to apply anatomical directional terms (e.g., dorsal/ventral, anterior/posterior, etc.) for animals as a whole (bipeds and quadrupeds). Recently, I've been studying plant physiology, and I ...
12
votes
1answer
4k views

Why do some plant species have lobed leaves, while similar species in the same habitat don't?

Some plants have lobed leaves, like the English oak (Quercus robur), while other plants growing the same deciduous woodland habitats, and very often growing alongside oaks, such as the European beech (...
11
votes
2answers
253 views

Why do cucurbits produce so much fluid when their stems are cut?

When carrying out some germination tests on species in the Cucurbitaceae, I notice that young plants of this family produce a lot of clear fluid when they are dissected. Most plants I dissect do not ...
11
votes
1answer
1k views

How do pineapples and lemongrass grow?

You can't plant the leaves, you can't plant the fruit, but, if you plant the part where leaves and fruit meet you will grow a whole pineapple plant. The part of the pineapple where the leaves meet ...
11
votes
2answers
499 views

Why aren't plants' roots as diverse as leaves?

I have been doing some gardening recently and I suddenly realised that all plants have superficially identical non-woody roots of the same size from gigantic trees to small fruiting plants and ...
10
votes
4answers
13k views

Why do plants store energy as carbohydrates and not as fats?

In my introductory biology class, we are learning about biomolecules. The textbook says fats are a more efficient energy store than carbohydrates. So my question is - why would plants store their ...
10
votes
1answer
190 views

Gender and age-specific mutation rate in plants

Background General concept According to Cochran and Harpending (2013), mothers transmits on average a number $x$ of new mutations to their offspring. This number $x$ is independent of the age of the ...
10
votes
1answer
204 views

What predates on cactus in the Atacama desert?

Introduction Last week, I was in the Atacama desert where I've seen many cacti. Some / many of them were seemingly suffering from predation. Most of predation seemed to be on cardón, often restricted ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Why do many fruit trees have five-petaled flowers?

Peach, pear, apple, cherry, and many other fruit trees seem to have flowers comprised of five petals. Assuming there is no evolutionary advantage to confusing students of trees, is there a plausible ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

Why does spraying water on plants help them survive in case of frost?

I've heard that spraying water on plants will help them survive the frost. Why is that? Some say that you should do it in the morning right before the sun rises, and others spray water the whole time ...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

What could cause spiral tree growth?

While hiking through one of the areas burned in the 1988 Yellowstone fires, I noticed that some of the trees appeared to have grown in spiral patterns. Most downed trees have crack patterns that ...
9
votes
3answers
53k views

Why should plants transform glucose into sucrose before transporting it to other parts?

I've learned that plants transform glucose into sucrose before sending it into phloem. But the process seems to be complex and energy comsuming. Why should plants do it? Is it really necessary?
9
votes
1answer
7k views

How can a monocot get so massive?

Some monocots (such as palms) are impressively thick and massive, yet botanists maintain that they don't have secondary growth. Why do botanists say this? How can it get so big without secondary ...
9
votes
2answers
196 views

How well does the radius of a tree correlate with its age?

I'm looking for a cheap non-invasive ways to approximate the age of a tree (a birch). Measuring the radius pops up in the mind as the first alternative. How would one do that? Measure at multiple ...
8
votes
1answer
161 views

Why can't we breed watermelons without any remaining seeds in the flesh?

Watermelon is just starting to come in season in the northeastern U.S., and having a seedless watermelon is convenient. The only downside is, the "seedless" almost always still have the immature, ...
8
votes
1answer
8k views

How do lilies sense day and night and open and close their flowers?

We have lots of lily flowers inside our garden. Their flowers are open in day and closed in night. How do lilies sense day and night and open and close their flowers?
8
votes
1answer
187 views

Is there a model perennial plant species?

Most of plant science is conducted on small annual species with short life cycles; predominantly Arabidopsis thaliana, but also a handful of others like Oryza sativa and Medicago truncatula etc. Is ...
8
votes
1answer
3k views

Regulation in plants bearing cleistogamous and chasmogamous flowers

In most plants bearing cleistogamous flowers, chasmogamous flowers are also borne by the plants. For example, Viola, Oxalis and Commelina contain both these kinds of flowers.( I am unaware of a ...
7
votes
2answers
137 views

Is the xylem like a tissue paper?

I am a 5th grader learning about the plant transport mechanics and I learnt that the xylem is made up of dead cells.So if water travels up the xylem and water travels only 1 way, is it like how water ...
7
votes
2answers
4k views

What chemicals and structures control the *direction* of plant growth in leaves, stems and roots?

If you want a specific plant, let's say the snap peas I am growing that I bought at Agway. I noticed that they grow towards the light source through the nearby window. Also I think roots work the same ...
7
votes
3answers
695 views

Identifying three species of Datura

I have found a large, wild patch, some 200m long, of mainly Datura Stramonium, in our street. I have always been keenly interested and well read on the shamanic, and - very rare - medicinal uses of ...
7
votes
1answer
455 views

Does a plant have to be alive for its roots to prevent erosion?

One argument often given in favour of saving current and planting additional plants/saplings is the roots hold soil together and prevent soil erosion. Unlike plants that may be uprooted, a large ...
7
votes
1answer
5k views

Why do bananas grow curved?

This old common question is still not clear to me. I got this explanation: Bananas go through a unique process known as negative geotropism. Instead of continuing to grow towards the ground, they ...
6
votes
1answer
195 views

What are these bumps on tomato stem?

What are the bumps on this tomato stem? They are way off the ground so I doubt they are air roots. What are they, what function do they have and why do they form?
6
votes
1answer
731 views

Xylem in the centre of the root

I want to ask a question about xylem in the centre of the root. I am reading a book about transport in plants, and it reads this regarding the root structure: Roots are subjected to vertical ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Species Identification: Bulbous root on plant, Southern California, USA

In Southern California, I was pulling out some roots and grasses and weeds in our backyard, and I noticed something weird. It appeared like there was a grape-sized bulb of something connected to one ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

How do the flowers of Diphylleia grayi become transparent after rain?

Known as the skeleton flower, its flowers turn transparent in rain. How does it do so? How can it gain transparency in rain when water is already present in flower? Or is it because other components ...
5
votes
1answer
592 views

What causes leaves to be hydrophobic?

In my garden, I'm growing broccoli. I was spraying it with water the other day, and I noticed that water bounced off the leaves. When I just misted it instead of a full-on spray, the water beads ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Where do trees get their shape?

Does anyone know any good resources dealing with shapes of trees? For example, pine trees are cone shaped for optimal absorption of sunlight, but lone pine trees growing in isolation (and other ...
5
votes
1answer
4k views

Sporophyte and gametophyte

My textbook says that in both groups of seedless plants (vascular plants, non-vascular plants) the gametophyte is a free-living plant, independent of the sporophyte. I don't understand this statement ...
5
votes
2answers
164 views

Can anyone ID this flower plant by the photo?

Can someone identify this plant? It has big red flowers when it flowers! Not sure if it is native, but it is in my grandmothers garden in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Does a plant have to have leaves to produce fruit?

Is it possible that a plant can still produce fruit, even though it may not have leaves? Are there any plant species that can produce fruit without leaves?
5
votes
2answers
8k views

Difference between thylakoids and lamellae in a chloroplast?

I'm slightly confused as to the difference between thylakoids and lamellae. My understanding was that thylakoids are 'discs' that are stacked into grana and there is a membrane between the grana ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

Why will happen if plant phloem does not contain sieve plates?

What are the primary functions of the sieve plates that make them so crucial? I've done a bit of reading online and found "Sieve plates are perforated end walls separating the component cells (sieve ...
5
votes
1answer
138 views

What's going on when roots turn green and grow into the air?

You're looking at a hibiscus and an orchid growing in the same pot. I'm curious why the hibiscus started growing green roots into the air. Or am I looking at a third plant that somehow made its way ...
5
votes
1answer
107 views

Is it normal for corn to have multiple ears in one place?

I have (out of a mistake) one corn plant in my greenhouse and it made 4 cobs in one place. Is that normal?! I never saw something like this before.
5
votes
1answer
130 views

How are Raunkiær's plant life forms viewed today?

At the beginning of the 20th century, Raunkiær proposed a typology of plant life-forms based on where they bear their buds, roughly as: cryptophytes: belowground hemicryptophytes: at the surface ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Where is pollenkitt secreted?

Where is the pollenkitt material secreted? I think the tapetum would be a good candidate, since it provides nutrition to the pollen grains.
5
votes
0answers
52 views

How does trees know to balance themselves so that they never fall down [duplicate]

Well i was flying kites today I saw a tree and its branches were spread around in random directions... I would like to know that how do these trees know to nourish their branches in some direction so ...
4
votes
2answers
666 views

Books for learning how plants function

Can you recommend a good, detailed book on how plants function? A book that explains plant processes on a molecular level from roots up to the fruit. I am interested in home crops production, such as ...
4
votes
2answers
299 views

Evolution theory - roses spikes - being more bulgy doesn't give you advantage

I've seen spike, huge spike. And I thought that development of such spikes could be contrary to the evolution theory. Being „little more” spiky doesn’t give you any advantage... So those individuals ...
4
votes
1answer
4k views

What does the empty space in the bamboo stem do?

Is the empty space inside a bamboo stem a xylem? And why is the space so large?
4
votes
2answers
749 views

How do researchers map root systems of plants?

For example, here is a picture of the root systems for some prairie grasses: (Click image for higher-resolution PDF) from: http://www.conservationresearchinstitute.org/educational-offerings.html How ...
4
votes
2answers
566 views

Is it possible to grow any kind of plant soilless (hydroponics)?

Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil. [wikipedia] My question is if is it possible to grow any kind of ...
4
votes
1answer
344 views

Why do Lapidaria margaretae look like stones?

Previous Research I stumbled across a trending reddit post "Lapidaria margaretae looks like stones" (as of 3rd Februrary 2015); but I could not find discussions as to reasons behind why. Question/s ...
4
votes
1answer
116 views

What is this growth on a Rosa rugosa stem?

I saw many of these on my big old Rosa rugosa bush yesterday. What are they?
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Do flowers transpire?

I have googled this out but no where found a satisfactory answer. The definition of transpiration states that it is the evaporative loss of water from the aerial surfaces of the plant but I am really ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Do aquatic plants have stomata?

I am wondering if aquatic plants have stomata or not. I know that non-aquatic plants have stomata to release water(transpiration) and oxygen, and to take in carbon dioxide. Do aquatic plants also have ...