Questions tagged [plant-physiology]

Study of the normal functioning of plants and plant cells

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Bacterium fixed nitrogen transfer mechanism

As it is well known, Rhizobium and other bacteria have the capacity to fix Nitrogen and thus perform a crucial role in the natrual nitrogen cycle. I am trying to find a reliable source on how the ...
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How can I determine statistical significance in seed length and width measurements?

I am researching seed size variation in cereals. I used ImageJ to measure the seeds and generated arbitrary values. Later I converted the measurements to micrometers. I took length and width ...
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Are there any plants that retrieve energy from the wind?

Many trees grow in windy places, but appear to have adapted to this by developing characteristics that provide resistance to wind. Are there any plants that appear to have been selected for the ...
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Water transport to the Shoot apical meristem in a seedling

I am familiar with how plants transport water from the roots to leaves. Specifically, Water evaporates from the leaf surface, generating a negative pressure gradient which pulls water up from the root....
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Can hybrids from closely related species with similar chromosomes reproduce?

Let's say the plant Triticum monococcum which has 2 sets of 7 chromosomes when diploid and 1 set of 7 chromosomes when haploid has the genome AA. When interbred with a different species that has the ...
Woo Luke's user avatar
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How many photosystems in a chloroplast?

I haven't been able to find any good order-of-magnitude estimates for how many photosystems (e.g. how many PSII complexes, how many PSI complexes) are in an average chloroplast (or perhaps per area of ...
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Explanation behind the observed chloroplasts in Elodea during Hypotonic vs Isotonic Solution

Me and my colleagues put the elodea leaf in distilled (hypotonic) and tap water (isotonic). We observed under the microscope that the elodea under the hypotonic solution became elongated and turgid, ...
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Why were vegetation coverages not assumed to be affected by precipitation, humidity or temperature?

I am trying to understand the graph topology of the structural equation model (SEM) given in Figure 1 of Bisset et al 2023. It is stated in the paper that it reflects an a priori causal structure. I ...
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Do Glycosides in plant seeds serve some other function than protecting the seeds?

Many plants have toxins like glycosides in the seeds and I think other parts of the plant and the accepted reason for this I believe is to discourage animals that ingest the seeds from digesting ...
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optimal spatial arrangement (distribution) of plants

Microalgae are organisms that can grow in aquatic environments and use light and carbon dioxide (CO2) to create biomass. Research showed that Microalgae's biomass can be used as a bio-fertilizer. My ...
Wissem Boujlida's user avatar
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Database or model for plant nutrient requirements with respect to soil and climate?

Microalgae are organisms that can grow in aquatic environments and use light and carbon dioxide (CO2) to create biomass. Research showed that Microalgae biomass can be used as a bio-fertilizer. My ...
Wissem Boujlida's user avatar
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Are there any genetically modified GMO squash with a vine growth habit which grow back from the root?

When I cut Scottish thistles with scissors, the thistle grows back from the tap root. When I accidentally step on squash vines, the squash vine dies. I was wondering if genetics research has produced ...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
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Why do sieve elements need to be alive

I am studying high school biology and I got these two pieces of information in khan academy and wikipedia: Sieve elements in phloem are living cells because the translocation includes active ...
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Induced mutation for fruit

If we induce a plant to be polyploidy would that affect other parts of the plant, for example when the plant produces a pollen grain would it still be (n) or would it be different?
Flora561's user avatar
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What is the nature of seedless fruits?

Can seedless fruit be produced in nature without humans interfering with the fruit? And would that be considered a spontaneous mutation?
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Which kind of inflorescence(s) does Sonchus oleraceus have?

Many capitulum inflorescences, several corymb inflorescences with capitulum inflorescences as the end nodes of each corymb inflorescence, or one compound corymb inflorescence with capitulum ...
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Do all plants have meristems?

Are there any plants that lack a meristem (at any phase in their lifecycle)? Searching for it on the web, the materials I find seem to assume no, but none say it explicitly.
sisima70's user avatar
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Sources of chlorophyll fluorescence

I have been reading this article recently, which claims that photoinhibition of photosystem II can have measurable impacts of chlorophyll fluorescence. This confused me, however, because ...
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Primary charge separation in Photosystem II

I was reading through an article about primary charge separation in Photosystem II when I came across the following graphic: I assumed that the axis is measured with respect to the unexcited system, ...
slithy-tove's user avatar
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Is a plant's own compost better for the plant?

Does it make a difference if a plant is composted and used for its own compost ? Meaning, let's say there is a plant "X" (example Cucumber) Would it grow better if the compost was made from ...
Anand Sunderraman's user avatar
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Does lower stomatal conductance of water influenced by elevated CO2 decrease overall evapotranspiration?

From what I understand, elevated CO2 levels decrease the stomatal conductance of water in plants. What I remember from irrigation sciences, higher temperatures should be more demanding on ...
Lukáš Tůma's user avatar
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Do monoecious plants have bisexual flowers?

I used to think that monoecious plants have male (unisexual) flowers and female (unisexual) flowers on the same plant but on different locations. But recently I learnt that monoecious plants also have ...
Tushar Singh's user avatar
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Why do highland/alpine plants require a drop in night temperatures to thrive?

There are mountain plants which require a drop in nightly temperature (many Nepenthes, Heliamphora and orchids for example). A non-specialist explanation is that the plants die of "starvation&...
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Caudex vs Xylopodium difference

I live in Brazil and many plants from the brazilian grasslands/prairies exhibit an structure called, by the brazilian literature, "xylopodium" (or "xilopódio" in portuguese) - ...
strange_bakery's user avatar
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How low potassium can potatoes have due to low potassium in soil?

According to Wikipedia 100 grams of potatoes has 2005 milligrams of potassium. But if there is low potassium in the soil where it grows, it may not be able to acquire so much potassium. How little of ...
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What are the most intelligent plants?

For intelligence lets adapt the definition from here: Perception of the surrounding environment Adaptation to environmental conditions Communication (in the case of plants, through chemical ...
discipulus's user avatar
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Are fairy rings documented as a growth pattern in ferns?

I planted an Onoclea sensibilis, a single plant, in my garden. After the first season, there was signs that a fairy ring was forming. A few years later it was mostly complete, but then was obscured in ...
KeithSmith's user avatar
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In traditional plant cloning, why do we require two different vectors (plasmids)?

So I was recently taught cloning in plants and I came to wonder what is the need to first put the gene of interest in the entry vector plasmid and then the final vector plasmid before finally ...
Sofía Herrera's user avatar
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Is there always a leaf(s) attatched to an auxillary bud?

I'm trying to create a 3D functional-structural plant model and I need to establish some axioms. Is it guaranteed or extremely likely that where auxiliary bud forms there's a leaf(s) attached? That's ...
Lambda's user avatar
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Photolysis of water

Photolysis of water releases $\text{O}_2$, $\text{H}^+$ ions and $\text{e}^-$. $\text{Mn}$ in the $\text{O}_2$ evolving complex also produces $\text{e}^-$. What provides $\text{e}^-$ to P680:$\text{Mn}...
Asha Kiran Lima's user avatar
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Is it scientifically sound to pool repeated measurements?

I am measuring specific phenolic compounds in leaves of A. thaliana. I have many different varieties, and different treatments. Initially I was measuring one leaf per plant for three plants for each ...
Rivered's user avatar
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scientific reasons behind a a sudden yet temporary growth sprout of the plant when the soil has No depth?

Sorry, I'm kind of naive when it comes to plant biology. Mark 4:5-6( New American Standard Bible 1995 ) 5 Other seed fell on the rocky ground where it did not have much soil; and immediately it ...
crazyTech's user avatar
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Difference between "biotroph" and "parasitic"

In the studying process for my exam I learned about ways of life of pathogenes in plants. There, it was mentioned, they can live nekrotrophic, hemibiotrophic or biotrophic. As far as I understand, a ...
Natalie's user avatar
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Calculation of solute, pressure and water potential

What would be the water potential (Ψw), solute potential (Ψs) and pressure potential (Ψp) at equilibrium when a cell with Ψs= – 0.7 MPa and Ψp= 0.7 MPa is placed in a solution with Ψs= – 0.5 MPa? (...
Neerav Singla's user avatar
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How long can zooxanthellae survive on their own, after being expelled from coral after a bleaching event?

So many sites (and books and journals and such) discuss how long different types of coral can survive without their dinoflagellate algae (zooxanthellae), but... How long can the poor little symbiotic ...
Kurt Hikes's user avatar
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How much sunlight is required for photosynthesis to peak?

I've read that photosynthesis peaks at some point over light intensities https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PI_curve According to https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/z9pjrwx/revision/5 suggests At very ...
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Issues obtaining Fo in DIY Imaging Fluorometer

I have successfully built an imaging fluorometer at home (see project details here) and so far is working amazingly well. But I am having serious issues in obtaining Fo to calculate Fv/Fm (Fm-Fo)/Fm. ...
Mayke Santos's user avatar
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vitamin D in mushrooms

How could I test vitamin D levels in mushrooms? (I am a high school student, our lab is pretty modern, but my resources are limited) I found an article about it (https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jfq/...
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What is the limiting factor for algal growth in the oceans?

As far as I can tell, pelagic algae require four main things to live: sunlight, carbon dioxide, trace minerals and physical space. What is the limiting factor? Note this is kind of a deceptive ...
Imprisoned Rhesus's user avatar
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Chemiosmotic hypothesis [closed]

During the transport of electrons, some H+ are removed from the chloroplast stroma, which causes a proton gradient to build up inside the thylakoid lumen. But what's the source of H+ in stroma at the ...
Mohit J's user avatar
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Nastic movements in Insectivorous plants

Questions: What type of plant movement is shown by each of Sundew, Venus Flytrap and Pitcher Plant? What is the mechanism of the movement? Can a movement be both Chemonastic and Thigmonastic? If yes, ...
Asmit Karmakar's user avatar
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1 answer
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In phloems, does the sap move through the sieve element cytoplasm?

We know that in xylems, the water move through the lumen of the vessel elements and move to the other vessel element through a pit. As the vessel elements are dead , there is no cytoplasm to block ...
An Alien's user avatar
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If stomata is closed at night ,how does exchange of oxygen take place at night? [closed]

In this article in the second paragraph, it is written that the stomata remains closed at night to reduce water loss. We know that the plants respire and take in oxygen at night. Then how do plants ...
An Alien's user avatar
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How do plants know to grow towards the light? [closed]

Plants lack a central nervous system. How do they know to drop leaves in full shade and to curve stems towards the current light source?
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Does Ethylene Triple response provide any advantage to the Arabidopsis thaliana Etiloated seedling,?

As ethylene has a triple response effect on Arabidopsis thaliana Etiloated seedling- 1 Shortening and thickening of Hypocotyl 2 Exaggerated apical hook 3 Short root According to this site Ethylene ...
Samardeep singh's user avatar
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The reason behind red drop effect

I was reading about Emersion effect on Wikepedia, I was not able to correlate our current knowledge of photosynthesis with this effect, First red drop effect When Emerson exposed green plants to ...
Samardeep singh's user avatar
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Why and how do Stomatal Guard cells turn flaccid at night time and cloudy days, and turgid during the days?

If I'm correct, the guard cells turn turgid during the day and flaccid at nights. What is the reason behind the same and how is it done? (im a noob highschool student, so basic explanations are ...
lilnewt761's user avatar
2 votes
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What causes the distinct color change in matured leaves in some plants?

Maybe that color change is caused by lower chlorophyll concentration in younger leaves' cells, or chlorophyll a to b ratio differs between younger and older leaves. All I could find is that the ...
Damocle Damoclev's user avatar
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Can Monsanto's (in)famous hybrid seed crops be cloned/grafted? If not, is there a technical or legal reason?

I understand that the seeds of a crop made from modern-day super hybrids will not, usually, produce the same quality plants in the next generation. Therefore, farmers have to buy new hybrid seeds each ...
Kurt Hikes's user avatar
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How does a diploid sporophyte form in non-recurrent apomixis?

I came across this definition of non-recurrent apomixis which occurs in angiosperms- In non-recurrent apomixis, both the egg-cell and embryo are haploid and embryo is developed directly from an egg-...
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