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Questions tagged [plant-physiology]

Study of the normal functioning of plants and plant cells

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1 vote
1 answer
268 views

Are there any fruits that rely on dispersal of their seeds using excrement?

Are there any fruits that have seeds which can survive the digestive entirety of an animal's digestive system and remain germinable once passed on in animal excrement? Perhaps this is the primary ...
3 votes
0 answers
389 views

How did fig tree take root in trunk of palm tree?

Please see pictures below. I never saw anything like this. Do the roots of the fig tree penetrate the trunk of the palm tree? Is there a symbiotic relationship between the two?
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

How does salicylic acid ingestion affect insect metabolism?

It is well known that plants may use salicylic acid as a signalling hormone when under attack by certain phytophagous insects. Moreover, exogenous salicylic acid admixing with insecticides seems to ...
0 votes
1 answer
184 views

Why and how do Stomatal Guard cells turn flaccid at night time and cloudy days, and turgid during the days?

If I'm correct, the guard cells turn turgid during the day and flaccid at nights. What is the reason behind the same and how is it done? (im a noob highschool student, so basic explanations are ...
3 votes
3 answers
1k views

Why do fruits have to ripen?

It seems like most fruits that we consume undergo some sort of ripening process either before or after they are picked from the vine, tree, etc. I understand that sugars are released during the ...
14 votes
1 answer
217 views

What actually kills a plant that requires winter dormancy if it is kept indoors all year?

In bonsai practice, beginners will commonly purchase a juniper (often Juniperus procumbens 'Nana'), which is an outdoor tree, and keep it inside all year. The tree invariably dies. It is commonly ...
-1 votes
1 answer
41 views

Is gibberlic acid present in monocots or not?

As gibberlic acid is a PGR and helps in elongation of stems like in sugarcane,so,if it is present naturally in monocots then rice should also have. And on other hand foolish seedling disease is caused ...
1 vote
0 answers
31 views

tools and techniques for determining nutrient status in plants

I am interested in tools and techniques, both commercial and academic, developed for determining nutrient status and identifying limiting nutrients in growing plants. My specific interest is in ...
1 vote
1 answer
47 views

Why does hydroponic basil grow a thick stem?

I heard of a basil plant growing a thick uncuttable base stem when grown hydroponically. In just 6 months. It also grew very tall. One explanation is the nutrient feed is too high. Why else might this ...
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Why are sunflower seeds so much smaller than their shells?

I was snacking on some sunflower seeds recently when I noticed the large disparity between the size of the seed itself and the woody shell surrounding it. Why is this gap present? Is there some ...
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

How are plant meristems free from viral infection?

My textbook mentions an application of tissue culture; A meristem extract from an infected plant (both apical and axillary work) can be used to grow a virus-free plant in vitro. But what makes these ...
0 votes
0 answers
13 views

Formation of xylem

Does metaxylem forms from protoxylem? Or they develop independently? My main motif is to clarify, " Is metaxylem just a more developed protoxylem? "
0 votes
1 answer
75 views

Do all plants have meristems?

Are there any plants that lack a meristem (at any phase in their lifecycle)? Searching for it on the web, the materials I find seem to assume no, but none say it explicitly.
0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Bacterium fixed nitrogen transfer mechanism

As it is well known, Rhizobium and other bacteria have the capacity to fix Nitrogen and thus perform a crucial role in the natrual nitrogen cycle. I am trying to find a reliable source on how the ...
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the purpose of DMT in plants?

N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is found, besides humans and other animals, in many plants(50+). In humans (in the pineal gland) it is suggested that it is used for our immune system. ...
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

How can I determine statistical significance in seed length and width measurements?

I am researching seed size variation in cereals. I used ImageJ to measure the seeds and generated arbitrary values. Later I converted the measurements to micrometers. I took length and width ...
0 votes
0 answers
53 views

Are there any plants that retrieve energy from the wind?

Many trees grow in windy places, but appear to have adapted to this by developing characteristics that provide resistance to wind. Are there any plants that appear to have been selected for the ...
10 votes
3 answers
3k views

Why aren't leaves black?

I s'pose this is a variant of the age-old question, "Why are leaves green?" It's fairly easy to ask teh internets and find plenty of answers for that one. I have a different but related question: ...
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

Water transport to the Shoot apical meristem in a seedling

I am familiar with how plants transport water from the roots to leaves. Specifically, Water evaporates from the leaf surface, generating a negative pressure gradient which pulls water up from the root....
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

Can hybrids from closely related species with similar chromosomes reproduce?

Let's say the plant Triticum monococcum which has 2 sets of 7 chromosomes when diploid and 1 set of 7 chromosomes when haploid has the genome AA. When interbred with a different species that has the ...
2 votes
1 answer
108 views

How many photosystems in a chloroplast?

I haven't been able to find any good order-of-magnitude estimates for how many photosystems (e.g. how many PSII complexes, how many PSI complexes) are in an average chloroplast (or perhaps per area of ...
0 votes
0 answers
89 views

Explanation behind the observed chloroplasts in Elodea during Hypotonic vs Isotonic Solution

Me and my colleagues put the elodea leaf in distilled (hypotonic) and tap water (isotonic). We observed under the microscope that the elodea under the hypotonic solution became elongated and turgid, ...
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

Why were vegetation coverages not assumed to be affected by precipitation, humidity or temperature?

I am trying to understand the graph topology of the structural equation model (SEM) given in Figure 1 of Bisset et al 2023. It is stated in the paper that it reflects an a priori causal structure. I ...
1 vote
0 answers
23 views

Do Glycosides in plant seeds serve some other function than protecting the seeds?

Many plants have toxins like glycosides in the seeds and I think other parts of the plant and the accepted reason for this I believe is to discourage animals that ingest the seeds from digesting ...
6 votes
3 answers
3k views

Is infrared photosynthesis possible?

The post-apocalyptic science fiction novel Dark Universe by Daniel F. Galouye has some plants living inside bunkers that use infrared light for photosynthesis. There are speculations that ...
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

optimal spatial arrangement (distribution) of plants

Microalgae are organisms that can grow in aquatic environments and use light and carbon dioxide (CO2) to create biomass. Research showed that Microalgae's biomass can be used as a bio-fertilizer. My ...
1 vote
1 answer
28 views

Database or model for plant nutrient requirements with respect to soil and climate?

Microalgae are organisms that can grow in aquatic environments and use light and carbon dioxide (CO2) to create biomass. Research showed that Microalgae biomass can be used as a bio-fertilizer. My ...
3 votes
0 answers
142 views

Why do sieve elements need to be alive

I am studying high school biology and I got these two pieces of information in khan academy and wikipedia: Sieve elements in phloem are living cells because the translocation includes active ...
0 votes
2 answers
208 views

Do monoecious plants have bisexual flowers?

I used to think that monoecious plants have male (unisexual) flowers and female (unisexual) flowers on the same plant but on different locations. But recently I learnt that monoecious plants also have ...
2 votes
1 answer
182 views

What is the nature of seedless fruits?

Can seedless fruit be produced in nature without humans interfering with the fruit? And would that be considered a spontaneous mutation?
0 votes
1 answer
148 views

Which kind of inflorescence(s) does Sonchus oleraceus have?

Many capitulum inflorescences, several corymb inflorescences with capitulum inflorescences as the end nodes of each corymb inflorescence, or one compound corymb inflorescence with capitulum ...
24 votes
6 answers
10k views

What determines the spiral direction of plants?

Some plants and vines spiral clockwise as they go along (right direction) and some spiral anticlockwise (left direction). What determines which direction they spiral along? At first, I believed it to ...
8 votes
1 answer
428 views

What part, roughly, of the carbon in a plant comes from the soil? As opposed to the atmosphere?

C4 plants contain a slightly higher percentage of carbon-13 than C3 plants. Is this because of carbon obtained from the soil or the atmosphere? I have read that plants using different chemical ...
4 votes
1 answer
38 views

Sources of chlorophyll fluorescence

I have been reading this article recently, which claims that photoinhibition of photosystem II can have measurable impacts of chlorophyll fluorescence. This confused me, however, because ...
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Primary charge separation in Photosystem II

I was reading through an article about primary charge separation in Photosystem II when I came across the following graphic: I assumed that the axis is measured with respect to the unexcited system, ...
-1 votes
3 answers
2k views

How do plants absorb CO2?

I see many repeated claims that plants absorb $CO_2$ from the air. $CO_2$ goes into the stomata, while $H_2O$ evaporates and leaves those same stomata. The $CO_2$ dissolves in the water in the plant ...
1 vote
1 answer
58 views

What is the use of having 3 antipodal cells and 2 synergids?

The embryo sac which is developed from functional megaspore contains 8 nuclei.2 polar nuclei and egg fuses with sperms.3 antipodal cells and 2 synergids degenerate after fertilization.Then what is the ...
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

Is a plant's own compost better for the plant?

Does it make a difference if a plant is composted and used for its own compost ? Meaning, let's say there is a plant "X" (example Cucumber) Would it grow better if the compost was made from ...
5 votes
0 answers
1k views

Explanation of the results of Warburg's Flashing Light experiment?

Between 1919 and 1920† Warburg obtained a higher rate of photosynthesis in Chlorella, exposed to rapid alternating periods of light and darkness, than when exposed to constant illumination. I would ...
1 vote
0 answers
10 views

Does lower stomatal conductance of water influenced by elevated CO2 decrease overall evapotranspiration?

From what I understand, elevated CO2 levels decrease the stomatal conductance of water in plants. What I remember from irrigation sciences, higher temperatures should be more demanding on ...
1 vote
1 answer
172 views

Why do highland/alpine plants require a drop in night temperatures to thrive?

There are mountain plants which require a drop in nightly temperature (many Nepenthes, Heliamphora and orchids for example). A non-specialist explanation is that the plants die of "starvation&...
2 votes
1 answer
87 views

Caudex vs Xylopodium difference

I live in Brazil and many plants from the brazilian grasslands/prairies exhibit an structure called, by the brazilian literature, "xylopodium" (or "xilopódio" in portuguese) - ...
4 votes
4 answers
2k views

Plants without bacteria? is it theoretically possible?

I know from school, that all live on the Earth need bacteria as low-level "machines" that break down/extract/convert/produce chemical elements and combinations, other high-level organisms needed. But ...
1 vote
1 answer
113 views

Are fairy rings documented as a growth pattern in ferns?

I planted an Onoclea sensibilis, a single plant, in my garden. After the first season, there was signs that a fairy ring was forming. A few years later it was mostly complete, but then was obscured in ...
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

How low potassium can potatoes have due to low potassium in soil?

According to Wikipedia 100 grams of potatoes has 2005 milligrams of potassium. But if there is low potassium in the soil where it grows, it may not be able to acquire so much potassium. How little of ...
0 votes
1 answer
833 views

What are the most intelligent plants?

For intelligence lets adapt the definition from here: Perception of the surrounding environment Adaptation to environmental conditions Communication (in the case of plants, through chemical ...
0 votes
1 answer
77 views

In traditional plant cloning, why do we require two different vectors (plasmids)?

So I was recently taught cloning in plants and I came to wonder what is the need to first put the gene of interest in the entry vector plasmid and then the final vector plasmid before finally ...
14 votes
2 answers
6k views

How does a tree trunk sprout and grow after being cut?

After I cut trees into logs and remove the branches in winter, they start growing. They sprout out and grow completely normal looking stems and leaves and maintain them all summer. The sprouts mostly ...
11 votes
2 answers
297 views

Why do cucurbits produce so much fluid when their stems are cut?

When carrying out some germination tests on species in the Cucurbitaceae, I notice that young plants of this family produce a lot of clear fluid when they are dissected. Most plants I dissect do not ...
2 votes
0 answers
26 views

Is there always a leaf(s) attatched to an auxillary bud?

I'm trying to create a 3D functional-structural plant model and I need to establish some axioms. Is it guaranteed or extremely likely that where auxiliary bud forms there's a leaf(s) attached? That's ...

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