Questions tagged [plant-physiology]

Study of the normal functioning of plants and plant cells

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6
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1answer
69 views

Why are plants unable to take up Phosphorus directly in their organic form like Phytic Acid?

I am researching acquisition strategies of phosphorus by decidious trees. I am reading a lot that plants take up nutrients as their inorganic form. In the case of P according to literature this is ...
4
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3answers
500 views

Why is amylose insoluble in water?

In a handout the following is stated: Amylose is insoluble in water, therefore a good storage compound e.g. in stroma of chloroplasts This is with regard to the chemical structure of the molecule. ...
0
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1answer
44 views

Regarding plant stress

I have to plan a bioinformatic study on a plant. Microarray data is available for various stress treatments (drought, cold, osmotic and flood stress) on root and shoot tissues. I am a bit confused as ...
2
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0answers
24 views

Why does the iron content differ in different species on seeds?

Iron can be affected by pH of the soil but why does each species actually have a different iron content. What causes it? What genes cause it?
1
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0answers
56 views

How is the role of ethylene in ripening demonstrated in biology (or agriculture) education?

I want to know what are some typical experiments performed in the course of biology education (or possibly in applied biology education e.g. agricutlure education) to prove to the students (or have ...
-1
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1answer
730 views

Is that true that plant stem cells can be used in humans?

I was reading an article (which seems very fake to me) on sensitive topics, but there was one astonishing statement: Stem cells are obtained from certain plants that grow all over the world. Once ...
2
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0answers
31 views

Why don't acacia trees prefer increasing tannin levels in their leaves rather than leaving them high?

According to this article, the Acacia tree has a chemical defence system which leads to the release of ethylene in the surroundings when a herbivore grazes on it. This leads to an increase in tannin ...
2
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2answers
4k views

Why do plants need oxygen through their roots?

I was asking myself why plants die from over-watering and the simple answer was that they can't get enough oxygen through their roots. But this made me ask myself why they need oxygen in their roots ...
-1
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1answer
260 views

How do plants absorb CO2?

I see many repeated claims that plants absorb $CO_2$ from the air. $CO_2$ goes into the stomata, while $H_2O$ evaporates and leaves those same stomata. The $CO_2$ dissolves in the water in the plant ...
1
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0answers
67 views

Could higher carbon dioxide levels be beneficial to plants?

C4 plants take ATP-expensive routes to ensure photorespiration does not occur. They minimise oxygen concentration in cells where the Krebs cycle occurs and cart carbon dioxide into these same cells. ...
11
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2answers
178 views

Can you accelerate the growth of a plant by accelerating its surroundings?

I had this weird idea of making plants grow faster when I first visited an indoor nursery which used floodlights instead of sunlight. They turned on during the day and went off during night in cycles. ...
0
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1answer
94 views

Does the sun light have to have *direct access* to fruits to make them sweet?

I understand that sun light is needed for fruits to ripen. In the years with less sun light, the fruits are usually not so sweet. So the sun light is needed to make the fruits sweet. Where and how ...
4
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1answer
119 views

Can herbs absorb harmful substances leached in water supply

I have small herb garden (parsley, coriander mint and basil) that is watered from below by a hydrophilic filter using capillary action from a reservoir. This filter allows water soluble nutrients to ...
3
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1answer
633 views

From where does the oxygen in glucose come in photosynthesis?

Is it carbon dioxide or water? I'm talking about the oxygen present in glucose and not the oxygen that is released after photolysis of water.
2
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0answers
12 views

Fixing plant leaf tissue for tensile tests

I'm a new master's student in mechanical engineering, and I'm researching crop biomechanics. We need to do some tensile tests on samples of corn stalk sheath, which involves securely and evenly ...
0
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0answers
46 views

GABA in plants (article about its mechanism)

I am studing to plant physiology exam and i cross over the statment about GABA in plants. It said that level of GABA increasing my thermal shock. But mechanism of effect on plants is unknown. Can ...
2
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2answers
306 views

What is the name of this plant with leaves having two different shades of green?

I am trying to find the name of this plant. I am attaching the relevant images. Thank you for your help. Location: Hyderabad, India
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0answers
34 views

Rubisco and Nitrogen Shortage Condition

Suppose a plant sprouted when $t=0$ and died when $t=T$. Let $t_*$ be the time when the plant shifts the resources usage to maximize its reproductive organ. In the case of nitrogen shortage during ...
1
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0answers
10 views

Measure Water-Use Efficiency without using carbon isotope fractionation?

I read "Measurements of delta (C-13) in C3 species may usefully contribute to the selection for transpiration efficiency." I think the device to measure carbon isotope fractionation is very expensive. ...
4
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0answers
51 views

What is a good approximate functional form for an equation relating plant growth to sunlight?

Question is in the title. I've got daily measurements of daily mean shortwave radiation at the surface, and annual measurements of plant growth (some measure, be it height or biomass or something). ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Can plants yield two more molecules of ATP from glycolysis?

Since 2 ATP are used to convert glucose to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in glycolysis, can plants bypass this step of ATP investment since they produce glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate directly from the ...
6
votes
1answer
673 views

Why are C4 plants mainly tropical plants?

Why is it that most C4 plants are tropical plants? As far as I am aware the C4 cycle does not prevent water loss; so having it exist in tropical areas does not serve these plants any good other than ...
1
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0answers
102 views

Effect of high temperatures on plant stomata

My biology textbook states that stomatal closure occurs at high temperatures to avoid water loss. Another stackexchange thread I can find (What is the effect of temperature and carbon dioxide on the ...
2
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3answers
1k views

Why is it that guttation is most commonly observed in the morning?

Knowing that guttation occurs through a plant's hydathodes due to root pressure forcing liquid water out of the leaves, I am curious as to why so many small drops of water are observable on plants in ...
6
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1answer
916 views

Xylem in the centre of the root

I want to ask a question about xylem in the centre of the root. I am reading a book about transport in plants, and it reads this regarding the root structure: Roots are subjected to vertical ...
-1
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1answer
94 views

How do plants grow year after year even though they die?

How do plants grow, die, and then grow again? For instance, when my plants die during the winter, how do they grow again next year? Does it have something to do with the root system? Or do they even ...
1
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1answer
71 views

What's the minimum, if any, concentration of atmospheric nitrogen needed by plants?

What's the minimum, if any, concentration of atmospheric nitrogen needed by plants? Would plants be able to grow in an atmosphere with just carbon dioxide and oxygen?
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1answer
160 views

What plants use the green spectrum? [closed]

What if the only light provided to a plant was from the green spectrum would plants adapt or starve?
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0answers
663 views

How many photons are used to make one glucose?

This was a question in a test. The options were (1) 8 (2) 16 (3) 24 (4) 48 My answer is 30 which was not in options. Given answer was 48. 12 NADPH 18 ATP for one glucose 12 NADPH and ATP ...
1
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2answers
63 views

Why is the separation of biochemical synthesis pathways safer and more economical?

During our first lecture of plant physiology, our teacher told us that the separation of biochemical synthesis pathways was advantageous because it was safer and more economical. The problem I got, ...
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0answers
184 views

Could alternatives to Photosynthesis be possible? [closed]

I'm working on a world for stories and games, and I'm trying to figure out some more diverse plantlife. There are areas of the world that won't get enough sunlight for Photosynthesis, so I'm thinking ...
2
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0answers
123 views

Does blue light cause stomata to open or close?

In my biology lecture notes, it says that blue light causes stomata to close. But thinking about it logically, since plants absorb a high percentage of blue light compared to light at other ...
4
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1answer
566 views

Which statement is incorrect for Rubisco?

My question is this: Which of the following is NOT correct for rubisco? a. It is the most abundant enzyme b. It catalyzes two different reactions c. It is involved in photorespiration d. It is not ...
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0answers
244 views

Ratio of oxygen produced / consumed by plants

Related questions: How long can a plant generate oxygen from its own carbon dioxide, produced during nighttime? Are plants actual oxygen factories? But the actual question I'm interested in is: ...
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0answers
273 views

Can light destroy auxin?

In my biology textbook, it says that plants grow towards light because auxin is laterally transferred from the light side to the shaded side, so more auxin stimulates growth and hence the plant bends ...
2
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3answers
100 views

Are agave plants perennial?

If I were to harvest an agave plant for its nectar, would it kill the plant? I have watched videos of the process and it seems quite invasive.
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0answers
28 views

Apical dominance in plants

Could someone help me understand a few concepts related to apical dominance 1) why auxin is a dominant over other hormones? 2) how exactly the mechanism of apical dominance works?
0
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1answer
147 views

Vine To Tree Root Grafting

I am experimenting with grafting multiple heartleaf philodendrons(philodendron cordatum) to the root of an oak tree(quercus). If the grafting is successful, the next step is to cut the root from the ...
3
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0answers
69 views

What amount of light energy is required to produce one O2 molecule? How about one molecule of NADPH?

I know that for each O2 molecule, a total of 8 photons are required (4 per photosystem). Would the amount of light energy required be E=hc/wavelength using 680 and 700? Or would the energy from the ...
1
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0answers
79 views

Can combining C3, C4 and CAM plants in a greenhouse/vertical farm increase the efficiency of plant production?

I am reading a little about different types of photosynthetic systems in plants because I want to learn something about plant production in greenhouses/vertical farms (I have no experience in this ...
7
votes
2answers
146 views

Is the xylem like a tissue paper?

I am a 5th grader learning about the plant transport mechanics and I learnt that the xylem is made up of dead cells.So if water travels up the xylem and water travels only 1 way, is it like how water ...
2
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0answers
164 views

Why do plants produce and store both amylose and amylopectin?

Since both forms of starch has its primary purpose of storing glucose and hence releasing energy, why are there 2 variations of this sugar? Is it possible for an organism to contain/depend only on 1 ...
3
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2answers
3k views

Why don't self pollinated crops show inbreeding depression?

Being continuously self pollinated means the fusion of same/similar genes from time to time, then why don't they show such a decrease in productivity?
-1
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2answers
622 views

Potato Power. Self sustaining medium using a living potato plant possible?

The second picture are potatoes wired in parallel. I understand that the potato is the medium for a chemical reaction between the copper and zinc. That aside, would wire and in soil potato plant ...
1
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1answer
22k views

What organelles are in an onion cell?

I was wondering what organelles are in an onion cell, because, based on the labs we are doing in my biology class, I only saw a nucleus and cell wall. My friends and brother say there are all the ...
-1
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1answer
293 views

Type of plant cell that builds a secondary wall in between two primary walls?

I read that there is this type of pattern in cell wall synthesys. What is the type of cell that does that and in what kind of scenario?
2
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0answers
232 views

Are there special pairs present in the RC of both photosystem I and photosystem II?

I am confused regarding the existence of special pair (primarily regarding PS2). Do both, P680 and P700 have special pair? I have checked various sources online and have come across conflicting ...
2
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1answer
46 views

Why are newly grown leaves red?

After a period of heavy rain, several trees in my garden will put out an impressive burst of new leaves, with an incredible vibrant red colour, almost the colour of port wine. The new leaves will then ...
4
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4answers
1k views

Stomata during night (respiration)

How does carbon dioxide from respiration diffuse out of the leaf during the night? Do stomata close completely during night?
6
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2answers
1k views

Why do humans transport glucose but not sucrose like plants?

The reason why plants transport sucrose rather than glucose is due to the fact that it is more efficient and that nearby cells would not take up all the glucose too quickly. Hence the plant convert ...