Questions tagged [plant-physiology]

Study of the normal functioning of plants and plant cells

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6
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1answer
6k views

What happens to tube nucleus of the pollen tube after fertilisation?

Background: Pollen tube contains a vegetative cell and a generative cell. The vegetative cell contains the tube nucleus, and the generative cell contains two male gametes. The two male gametes fuse ...
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0answers
76 views

Why does abnormal mitosis takes place in the cells of tapetum?

I know that the tapetal cells present in the anther are binucleate. I also know this means that after karyokinesis the cell does not divide itself and instead form a syncytium. This occurs due to ...
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118 views

Why male gametes doesn't go through antipodal cells in chalazogamy

Male gametes in double fertilisation enter the embryo sac through synergid cells even in chalazogamy i.e. when polen tube enters the ovule through chalazal end. Regarding the fact that compatibility ...
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1answer
56 views

Plant Nutrition

Alfie has two plants, A and B. He used some Vaseline to coat the top of the leaves on plant A and the underside of the leaves on plant B. He left the plants on the windowsill for a week and watered ...
6
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1answer
3k views

At what point is a picked flower considered dead?

Let a flower be picked from the ground such that its stem is cut and the (a?) flower is separated from the root system (as in figure). Questions: 1a. At what "point" is it considered dead? Does ...
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Why do certain ferns have roughened spore surface?

Ferns such as Anemia phyllitidis, Blotiella lindeniana, Ctenitis hirta, Cystopterix fragilis, Hemionitis palmata and many others have roughened splity spore surface. I ask, why is it evolutionary so?...
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225 views

Are there any fruits that rely on dispersal of their seeds using excrement?

Are there any fruits that have seeds which can survive the digestive entirety of an animal's digestive system and remain germinable once passed on in animal excrement? Perhaps this is the primary ...
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2answers
3k views

Can plants be grown using lights in the home?

Plants need sunlight to grow, mainly the blue and red wavelength of the sunlight . The lights used in homes are also white light, it will also have red and blue wavelength of light. So , can they be ...
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1answer
66 views

Aging and death of perennials

Perennial plants species generate a new plant annually from the same parent root stock. At the end of the year that new shoot withers and dies, to re-appear the next year. Hence, the above-ground ...
6
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1answer
73 views

How should lentil roots grow in a microgravity system?

I recently executed an experiment in which I collocated 20 lentil seeds in independent Petri boxes with an agar agar solution, all of it located in a clinostat (a slowly rotating device used to ...
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0answers
830 views

When is it unacceptable to measure dry mass in an experiment to measure growth of plants?

I'm an A level student (British high school final year) and I was doing an exam question which asked for the design of an experiment to test the effect of light intensity on the growth of a certain ...
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2answers
10k views

Why do some vegetables taste bitter?

Bitter gourd, cucumber, etc. are bitter to taste. Which chemical causes bitterness in them? I found these when I searched online: this says that it is because of calcium, while this and this talk ...
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2answers
4k views

Effect of transpiration on plant growth

It is said that only about 1-5% of water used by plants is used in photosynthesis while the rest is transpired. Suppose that a plant grows in an environment where the temperature is not too high but ...
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2answers
7k views

How many cyclic and non-cyclic photo-phosphorylation is required to produce one molecule of glucose?

In non-cyclic photophosphorylation 1 ATP and 2 $NADPH_2$ molecules are produced. In cyclic photophosphorylation 2 ATP molecules are produced. For production of one molecule of Glucose 18 ATP and 12 $...
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1answer
1k views

Why does spiral or annular thickening occur in water conducting plant vessels?

From what I behold, spiral and annular thickening of xylem and trachied cell walls leaves a lot of not thickened regions of cell wall. Lignin is the material which prevents water from escaping these ...
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68 views

Definition of Ancestral Eudicot?

I am wondering what are examples of ancestral eudicots which can be purchased from an aquarium store, and or grocery flower store.
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0answers
49 views

What is the incentive for plants to add rich nutrients to food?

As we know fruits are good sources of vitamins and minerals. What is the incentive for plants to add so much of vitamins and minerals to fruit pulp. My thought is that seeds would need is some ...
2
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1answer
69 views

How many plants arise from a polyembryonic seed? [closed]

When I asked this question to my teacher she said that she doesn't know. So I wanted to know? Is there any use of polyembrony in plants?
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0answers
112 views

Separation of sister chromatids diring anaphase without Centrosomes in plant cell during mitosis

As in animal cell during mitosis sister chromatids are separated from each other during Anaphase by the pulling of kinetochore fibers toward their originating poles of centrosomes but as we know that ...
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4answers
14k views

Why do plants store energy as carbohydrates and not as fats?

In my introductory biology class, we are learning about biomolecules. The textbook says fats are a more efficient energy store than carbohydrates. So my question is - why would plants store their ...
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0answers
121 views

How does P-protein (phloem) help in sealing of wounds?

While I was reading a book I found that "P-proteins in the sieve elements of phloem help in sealing of wounds along with callose". So how does p-protein do that, moreover how can it reach to other ...
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0answers
106 views

Is Inosculation of Young Roots Impossible?

I have only seen root inosculation to occur on old surface tree roots. Planting trees closely together (almost) always results in a tangled mesh of individual roots. Even though they are quite tightly ...
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1answer
6k views

How many cells are in prophase on this onion root tip slide?

In the following image, I have to identify the cells in the different phases (not counting the cells that are too faded to see), and it's fairly easy to identify metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, ...
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1answer
2k views

The colour of aquatic plants found deep under oceans

I have read that many aquatic plants found in deep oceans are red in colour, however, I do not understand why. As red is the color which gets the least scattered it should be the only light available ...
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1answer
283 views

What is the theoretical maximum height of a herbaceous plant stem?

Foreword: I'm posting this here instead of, say, Worldbuilding, because while it is based in a speculative concept, this is a question purely of biology as we know it instead of speculative biology ...
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1answer
229 views

What is the difference between intials cells and meristems cells?

Generally plant tissues: meristems tissue: meristems cells, apilal meristems, lateral meristems Non meristem tissue: dermal tissue, vascular tissue, ground tissue my question: What is the ...
11
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1answer
591 views

Why do birches have a white bark?

Several species of the tree genres Betula have a white bark,especially when they are young. This is quite peculiar to trees - at least in central Europe; so I'm wondering if there is a ecological ...
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529 views

Do plants have cellulases?

I can't seem to find the answer to this. Not even Wikipedia could help- it mentioned bacteria and fungi that have cellulases but not plants. Using my own reasoning, I would think that On the one ...
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1answer
619 views

Why can’t plants prepare their own water?

Water is needed by every living object. If plants have developed that property of theirs to prepare their own food from simple molecules, why can't they also prepare water? Oxygen are present in the ...
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2answers
164 views

Nomenclature of enzymes involved in synthesis of glutamine

I am considering nitrogen fixation and in my lecture notes, there is the statement The glutamine synthetase- glutamate synthase system requires use of an ATP molecule as well as reducing power. ...
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1answer
460 views

Plant growth in blue light

For the past two weeks, I have been in a group of 3 studying how different lights affect plant growth. So we growth two chickpeas plants and put one in white light and the other in blue light. These ...
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1answer
71 views

On the premise of crop rotation, is there similarly a plant or organism able to provide nutrients into its environment that exists in water biomes?

I know of the simple concept of crop rotation, and being able to use certain plants to replenish soil, and was wondering if there is a plant or organism that can or does function similarly but in ...
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1answer
2k views

Does plasmolysis kill plant cells?

I know when a plant cell becomes fully plasmolysed that the protoplast shrinks away and eventually is no longer joined to the cell wall. Is this irrevocable damage? Can the cells survive it and ...
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1answer
2k views

What two conditions does the closing of the stomata help to prevent?

I was given the following question: What two conditions does the closing of the stomata help to prevent? I know that one of them is transpiration, but multiple searches on google could not yield ...
3
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1answer
351 views

Evolution of plants and chloroplasts?

I am considering the evolution of plants, specifically considering the chloroplast. I am getting slightly confused and cannot seem to find the information I need to build a coherent picture in my head....
2
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1answer
539 views

Does the process of photosynthesis occur in insectivorous plants? [closed]

Does the process of photosynthesis occur in insectivorous plants? Can you please give me a clear answer and explain to me how? and also can you describe the environment in which they grow ? Thank you
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243 views

What is a good method to test the effect of gibberellin concentration?

I was just wondering what a good method would be to test the effect of gibberellin concentration on growth. I know it is prevelant in many flowering plants but am unsure as to what would be suitable. ...
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1answer
198 views

Do all plant hormones of one group show the same qualitative effect with respect to their target pathway(s) and the biological response?

I wonder, terms like "Auxin", "Cytokinin", "Gibberellin" etc means NOT a single compound; but a class of compound. For example "Auxin" does-not mean a single compound, but several compounds such as :...
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1answer
371 views

Why don't plants use radio waves?

I heard that the Earth's atmosphere is opaque at most wavelengths and only allows visible light and radio waves through, so why have plants evolved to only absorb visible light?
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136 views

Why do basil leaves turn black?

I notice that when I buy basil it is fresh and green in the store, but when I take it home it wilts and turns black within 24 hours. Why does it do this?
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2answers
257 views

Are plants actual oxygen factories?

Is the oxygen exhaled by plants during the day compensated by inhalation of carbon dioxide at night?
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0answers
183 views

Why does a broad-leaved evergreen (Mahonia aquifolium) has red leaves?

To my knowledge, oregon grape (Mahonia aquifolium) is purportedly an evergreen shrub? Deciduous broadleaf plants lose their leaves in autumn usually and before that as the leaves die they oxidize and ...
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1answer
1k views

Are the arrows in this diagram of ATP synthase correct?

I have a question about this image below. Do you think that the pink arrow is actually going in the right direction? I would suggest a LTO sequence and not LOT, since it is in the T state that ADP + ...
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1answer
408 views

Why are chromatophore in phaeyophycae chloroplasts integrated within the endoplasmic reticulum?

Why are chromatophore in phaeyophycae chloroplast integrated within the endoplasmic reticulum? While reading about phaeyophycae I came across this point, but couldn't figure out why and what could be ...
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1answer
86 views

Biological data source of trees

I need some biological data for many types of trees, but I can not find good source of this on internet. Where can I find following type of biological data of any tree: Biological Profile Taxonomy ...
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2answers
1k views

What is nastic movement due to growth?

I have read in my biology book that "nastic movement is the movement that occur due to difference in the rate of growth on two opposite sides of a plant organ" , but I can't visualize how this ...
3
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2answers
281 views

epiphyte mats in tropical forests

I read in an ecology text book ("Ecology: Concepts and Applications" (7th edition) by Manuel Molles) that trees in tropical forests can be sustained despite the poor soil is because they extract ...
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1answer
5k views

Why do bananas grow curved?

This old common question is still not clear to me. I got this explanation: Bananas go through a unique process known as negative geotropism. Instead of continuing to grow towards the ground, they ...
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1answer
683 views

anabolism in plants

The question is as following: Which substance has the greatest contribution to the anabolism of glucose in plants. A- Oxygen (O2). B- Water (H2O). C- carbon dioxide (CO2). The official answer given ...
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3answers
1k views

Can plants grow without photosynthesis?

Animals can survive without eating if nutrition is injected directly into their blood. Can the equivalent be done with plants? By injecting carbohydrate rich nutrient solution, either without ...

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