Questions tagged [proteins]

Biopolymers consisting of amino acids that fold into 3D shapes and perform a large number of functions in living organisms.

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How well does “basal rate of amino acid catabolism” correlate with dietary requirements for amino acids?

To what extent does the basal rate of amino acid catabolism account for the dietary requirements for amino acids (and, the resulting need to evolve organs to dispose of excess nitrogen)? The ...
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Budget for essential amino acid intake, what degrades endogenous amino acid pool?

Any organism unable to synthesize all amino acids has to eat their essential amino acids. They only have to do so because their existing pool of those amino acids, within their body, is diminished. ...
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Does cellular respiration use amino acids even if it has other substrates like glucose?

Thinking about the "nitrogen budget" in animals (ranging from protists to Porifera, Radiata, invertebrates and vertebrates), I had the idea that cellular respiration might not be able to selectively ...
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Protein content in chemical composition of different phyla?

The protein content in the human body is roughly 15%, what are the percentages for other organisms? Bacteria, plants, fungi, protozoa, etc.
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Protein consumption by different phyla including bacteria

How much protein do different phyla need to consume? Humans need to consume roughly 56 gram per day, insufficient protein leads to Kwashiorkor. What about other phyla, what level of protein ...
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Major source of amino acid consumption in humans?

Humans need to consume roughly 56 grams of amino acids per day, and, assuming only essential amino acids need to be consumed, 11/20th of that, 30 gram. What exactly is the major source of amino acid ...
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How does a protein molecule enter a cell through the cell membrane? [closed]

I can't find a good explanation as to how a whole protein molecule enters a cell membrane. Is it through endocytotic vesicles, with the help of ATP? How does this occur? Thanks for the help!
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Which proteins are part of the most different protein complexes?

Let n be the number of different protein complexes (as defined here) that a protein may be a stable part of for a considerable amount of time (and not only transiently). Which proteins have the ...
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Genes and proteins with a significantly inbalanced composition

According to Wikipedia, the median size of a protein-coding gene is 26,288 bp which makes it possible (from statistical considerations) that the nucleotides C, G, A, T appear in roughly equal amounts ...
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Cell type = gene expression spectrum?

I wonder if it is correct to say that the type of a cell is essentially its spectrum of expressed genes, i.e. the rates at which it produces specific proteins. As these rates may change (e.g. during ...
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Are the 70s ribosomes in archaea similar to the 80s ribosomes in eukarya

I understand that archaea are closer to eukarya than they are to bacteria (especially in the proteins of their RNA polymerase) but are they also similar in their ribosomes? (despite having different s ...
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In the notch signaling pathway, what is Fringe activating?

Take a look at the notch signaling pathway in human from KEGG : https://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_pathway?hsa04330 I want to know what is Fringe activating. It is not pointing to another gene or ...
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Can the human body store protein?

I am interested to know if a human body can store protein. Absolutely for the bodybuilders, does it really matter if they divide their protein consumption during the day or eat all of it in one meal ...
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Peptides neither produced by the ribosome or the non-ribosomal peptide synthase complexes

I read in Wikipedia: While there exist a wide range of peptides that are not synthesized by ribosomes, the term nonribosomal peptide typically refers to a very specific set of these as ...
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AChE aging time of organophosphates containing hydroxyl groups

Organophosphorus compounds are known to inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE). This occurs when the organophosphate phosphorylates the serine-203 residue of the enzyme. If the enzyme is not ...
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How to analyze phosphorylation shift by western blot?

I want to see the phosphorylation shift in my protein of interest. I have created a point mutation in my protein. so that it will not able to go for the phosphorylation compare to my control. i want ...
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If a gene is missing from an operon that structures a protein, then would that protein not be made properly?

From my understanding, operon is a series of genes that are regulated by a single promotor. In many cases genes in an operon form subunits of a protein. I obtained a genome in my study and looked for ...
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Statistics: How are protein species distributed over cell types?

There are roughly 10,000 to 20,000 protein species in the human proteome (while I've seen also numbers of 500,000 to 1,000,000). Furthermore, there are roughly 200 different cell types in the human ...
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Bimodal frequency distribution of size of protein loops

The graph of number of amino acid (AA) residues in a loop Vs the frequency of their occurrence in proteins largely follows a tending-to-zero pattern. However, there appear to be some specific number ...
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How are proteins reused in the body? [duplicate]

Part of what we eat are proteins, and our body is in part build of proteins. Are the proteins of the body build based on proteins in food at all? Are proteins in food directly reused in the body, or ...
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What difference in proteins radius of gyration can be considered significant?

In molecular dynamics simulations of proteins, the radius of gyration is often used to assess the compactness of a protein. When comparing two protein radius of gyration, what difference can be ...
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Why is dimethylmercury so poisonous? [closed]

According to the Wikipedia article Karen Wetterhahn, Karen Wetterhahn died after only a very small amount of dimethylmercury got absorbed through the gloves. What is it about the way the body works ...
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Is brewer's yeast a good source of protein for humans?

I read that brewer's yeast protein is not a "real protein" and is not usable by non-ruminants. Is that true? If yes, how can I know what kind of protein is good for humans (especially athletes)
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KRAS gene and K-Ras Mutations

This question pertains to the KRAS wikipedia page, and I just want to double check and clarify my own understanding of how this mutation works in cancer. It states: K-Ras protein acts like a ...
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Appropriate regeneration of StrepTrap HP columns for FPLC

My question is related to protein purification using a ÄKTA FPLC. We used StrepTrap HP Columns (1 ml column Volume (CV)) from GE Healthcare Life Sciences to purify a strep-tagged protein. In the first ...
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What happens to embedded membrane proteins after a vesicle is formed?

When an animal cell is going through endocytosis it cell surrounds a food particle, and the membrane swallows it, creating a vesicle within the cell. However, what happens to the embedded ...
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Are Hsp70 proteins only activated in response to heat shock?

Hsp70 proteins are chaperones that assist in protein folding in my plant physiology textbook it says the Hsp70 proteins were discovered by inducing heat shock. But do they only work in response to ...
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How to get a list of kinases that phosphorylated a particular protein?

I am analysing the protein SF2 (also named as SRSF1). In the database, it is shown that this protein is often phosphorylated at the 189th tyrosine residue. I want to know which proteins could have ...
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Is mucus significantly affected by the presence of ions?

In mucus, there is besides water and the mucins (Proteins for mucus), there are Ions like $Ca^{2+},Na^{+}$, etc. I have read that These Ions can Control the mucus swelling, i.e. the volume that the ...
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Why does the structure for cellular retinol binding protein show interactions with cadmium ions?

A structure of cellular retinol binding protein (1CRB) contains two cadmium ions as ligands. Is Cd2+ a ligand of CRBP and, if so, is that interaction necessary for protein function or is the protein a ...
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Protein folding

I've two questions 1. Is free ATP available in the cytoplasm of the cell? 2. In the protein folding funnel, prions and other misfolded proteins are located at the local minima of the graph. If ATP ...
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Do carrier proteins constantly open and close or do they only work when a substance binds to them?

What causes carrier proteins to change shape ? Do they need energy to change shape? If that is true, how are they involved in Facilitated diffusion ? By changing shape, do we always mean opens from ...
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is consuming collagen actually good for skin/joint health? [duplicate]

A coworker of mine insists on drinking a very expensive collagen supplement for their skin health. It seems like a gimmick- Doesn't the digestive process breakdown proteins to their constituent amino ...
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Which lipoprotein has the highest protein content?

I know that HDLs have the highest protein/lipid ratio but know that the HDLs are very small molecules too and I couldn’t find the exact answer for this question. I mean, by amounts which of these ...
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Can two proteins activate/inhibit the same gene at the same time?

Suppose there are two proteins inhibiting a particular gene. Its not necessary that both will inhibit the gene at the same time instance right? So if one protein has already inhibited that gene before ...
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Is it scientifically feasible to compare two samples of different sizes, while values in each sample are average numbers?

I want to compare result from my protein docking experiments to various protein structures of the same protein. I have two samples and in Sample 1, I have ...
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Can enzymes be modeled using classical mechanics?

When enzymes interact with substrates (i.e. a small ADP molecule and the much larger ATP synthase), does quantum mechanics play a significant role? Or can the interactions be relatively accurately be ...
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Why is sickle cell trait expressed in half of all cells rather than all cells containing half-sickled haemoglobin

If sickle cell trait is due to be heterozygous with respect to a single gene mutation on the haemoglobin β-globin chain, why is it the case that ~50% of RBCs are sickled rather than half of the ...
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Fluorescence assays to identify protein concentration without adding a large peptide sequence?

I'm trying to find a way of tagging a protein with something visually quantifiable to track protein concentration through potential purification steps and screen for the most efficient such steps. ...
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Why does protein folding not depend on the order in which it is synthesized?

I read an article recently, written by researcher from Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, which stated that: Similarly, success in de novo protein design bears on the question I ...
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How do mutations and protein synthesis link to cancer?

How do mutations and protein synthesis link to cancer? I know that a mutation in DNA can cause the triplet code on the mRNA to change so different amini acids are made and a different order means a ...
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Which proteins are most sensitive to electric fields?

Many Proteins have ionic charges that can attract each other (e.g. Formation of salt bridges) or repel each other. On the other Hand, Proteins are mostly immersed in water that screens most of the ...
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Are there any proteins not found in the brain that are affected by prions?

A prion is an abnormally folded protein that is capable of causing otherwise normal proteins to also misfold and become prions. They are responsible for causing diseases such as Kuru and Creutzfeldt–...
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Why spider's web don't burn when electricity touches it?

I saw and spider on it's web at an electrical cable and thinked: If the web is made of proteins, why dont burn. Sorry, the photo is dark because is night in Ecuador
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Formation of disulfide bonds in protein expressed after transduction

Say I transduce a nucleic acid sequence using a viral vector that encodes a protein having at least one disulfide linkage. For simplicity, let’s assume that there are only two cysteines in the protein ...
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What is the typical range of volumetric productivity and cell density in aerobic fermentor bioreactors for microes?

Im doing research on biomass production. Its hard to find data for this question. I need citations to calculate the production rate of microbial biomass in bioreactors (e.g aerated fermentator). ...
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Estimating diffusion constant of a protein based on number of amino acids

Is there a way to estimate the diffusion constant of a protein based on the number of amino acids it is comprised of. I know that the shape of the protein has an influence on the diffusion constant, ...
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Do all humans have an identical nucleotide sequence for certain proteins, e.g haemoglobin?

All humans have the same sort of proteins in our bodies. Take haemoglobin for example. Is the gene coding for haemoglobin in my body identical to everyone else's gene or is there slight variations ...
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The Collagen Triple Helix

In the amino acid sequence X-Hyp-Gly (where X can be any amino acid) of the triple helix can the Hyp residue be both hydroxyproline and hydroxylysine? In our textbook it says that the Hyp residue is ...
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Does the arrangement of amino acids in a protein matter for nutrition?

Let's say there are two diets, consisting of entirely different proteins. If you split up all of the proteins from one day of each diet, you'll get the same set of amino acids and the same count of ...

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