Questions tagged [proteins]

Biopolymers consisting of amino acids that fold into 3D shapes and perform a large number of functions in living organisms.

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39 views

conversion of distance matrices to pdb/coordinates

I am currently facing two transformational issues. Suppose I am given a protein's residue sequence and calpha distance matrix; is there a way to generate the 3d coordinates of the protein's residues ...
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243 views

Why do protein solutions have to be alkalised in biuret test?

I’ve read that CuSO4 solution reacts with peptide bonds that connect amino acids to create a violet colour, but the instructions always tell me to add NaOH solution to the protein solution before I ...
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239 views

How do organophosphates actually work?

The common explanation as to what the primary mechanism of action for organophosphates (and carbamates) is is the inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase and resulting buildup of acetylcholine ...
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62 views

Immunoprecipitation compared to western blotting

Immunoprecipitation and western blotting are both used to locate a specific protein within a sample and to isolate it. In immunoprecipitation, a specific antibody and agarose beads ( or other ...
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54 views

Preparing sample for SDS PAGE

I have more than 10 cell lysate samples (70 µL each) whose concentration varies from 1.9 mg/mL to 4.8 mg/mL. I have 5X and 2X SDS sample buffers. I would like to prepare SDS PAGE samples in such a way ...
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5k views

Why are prions in animal diets not destroyed by the digestive system?

According to CBC: Mad cow disease is the common name for a condition known technically as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE. [...] The only known source of mad cow disease is from animal-...
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Where can I find and download HMMTOP training set?

I would like to perform redundancy reduction for my test set for membrane topology prediction. I checked the 1998 paper and website of the HMMTOP server but haven't found any download links for the ...
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1answer
81 views

Backbone hydrogen bonds between adjacent amino acids in a protein?

Is it possible for two adjacent amino acids in a peptide to form hydrogen bonds between the backbone NH and CO? Are there any examples of such situations in proteins and how common are they? If ...
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29 views

Intein Splicing

Currently I am trying to read and understand this paper on intein splicing. https://sci-hub.tw/https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22001202 However, I'm a little confused with Figure 4. Why do the ...
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100 views

Does digestion require hydrochloric acid?

Would our digestion function any differently if we secreted something else, like sulfuric or nitric acid, instead? I'd assume an acidic environment may be required, but not sure if chloride is also ...
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66 views

If overcooked hard boiled eggs show these green sulfide rings, why do scrambled/fried eggs not show this?

In the image above, the dark green rings are ferrous sulfide rings, caused when the sulfur from the egg white reacts with the iron in the egg yolk when the egg is overcooked. I was wondering, given ...
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How do you interpret the resulting bands of gel zymography?

I would like to clear up some things for gel zymography. I understand that bright bands show proteolytic activity. But which molecular weight do these bands correspond to? Is it the weight of the ...
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How does the immune system recognize harmful proteins?

How does the human immune system detect whether a protein happens to be a protein found in the body that is supposed to be there, a bacterial toxin that should be inactivated, an already inactivated ...
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5 views

What is a secretion target family protein?

I came across this link: https://www.genome.jp/dbget-bin/www_bget?btw:BF38_3398 What is this protein, is it a secreted effector protein or is it something else? What is the difference between type ...
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67 views

Are there only a few alleles or groups of many alleles impacting protein structure and function?

I'm in the first year of Medicine and I'm studying Genetics and Evolution. I have this doubt in the back of my mind and I'm not being able to move forward without someone explaining me what's wrong ...
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1answer
51 views

How does the body detect irreversible binding to receptors?

I have read an article on Wikipedia about irreversible agonists and antagonists. These permanently bind to a target receptor on a cell. However, the receptor protein is then internalized and recycled ...
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Why do BRAF mutations appear more in skin cutaneous melanoma?

When looking at the tissue expression of the BRAF protein it seems that BRAF is regularly expressed in almost all of the tissues. There is elevated expression in tissues like the Testis and the ...
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protein size range for ultrafiltration or nanofiltration

I am hoping to concentrate mixed proteins in homogenized leafy vegetables such as kale, spinach etc (after removing pulp and fibers) as a first step in further investigations (second step using size ...
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168 views

Why are dietary recommendations for methionine consumption combined with cysteine?

I want to understand the amino acids missing in certain vegetables. I looked up the US recommendations for amino acids (source: wikipedia). I don’t understand why they pair Methionine + Cysteine: ...
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1answer
39 views

Where do the lysines come from during ubiquitination?

I know that Ub forms an isopeptide bond with lysine, but where do the lysine come from? Are they just always available for the Ub to find to during the ubiquitination process? Is there a free lysine ...
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1answer
145 views

Is it possible for human body to convert carbohydrates to protein? [closed]

Is it possible for human body to convert carbohydrates to protein to build muscle for example? EDIT: I read in many articles that you should eat more than 1.5 gram protein for each 1 kg weight of ...
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What is the fastest way to crystallise lysozyme (for student course)?

High school sudents are going to visit my university and I plan to demonstrate crystallisation of lysozyme. I ordered pure lysozyme from VWR. I can easily crystallise this within 15 min in batch (4% w/...
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226 views

Do chaperone proteins misfold?

If molecular chaperone proteins assist in the folding process of other proteins and misfolded proteins, can chaperone themselves misfold since they are also proteins? What would happen if chaperones ...
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Can someone help me interpret these charts on fluorescent polarization?

I have to present an article about binding designed proteins to fentanyl for my biochem class; I understand everything except how to interpret these charts on fluorescence at the very top of Figure 2a:...
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How do scientists determine the nature of ions passing through a channel/carrier/pump?

The NCE (Sodium Calcium Exchanger) transports 3 Na+ inside the cell for 1 Ca2+ outside. How did we figure this out, and other mechanisms of this sort? If it were a protein, we could tag it with GFP. ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the importance of alkaline condition in biuret test?

Biuret test aims to quantify the amount of protein in a given unknown sample. Biuret agent contains copper sulphate, sodium potassium tartrate and Sodium hydroxide. Coppper ions form the complex of ...
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1answer
41 views

Obtaining protein atomic co-ordinates from dihedral angles

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dihedral_angle#/media/File:Protein_backbone_PhiPsiOmega_drawing.svg I've been reading on Protein Amino Acid Sequences and their 3D structure. It seems that the 3D ...
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243 views

Plasma Membrane Proteins and Cytoskeletal Attachment

Regarding membrane protein functions, which of the following statements is CORRECT? a. Membrane proteins are responsible for both cell to cell recognition and cell anchoring and are ...
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1answer
170 views

What are the different types of helices in protein secondary structures and how do they differ?

What are the different types of helices in protein secondary structures and how are they differentiated? In the DSSP docs, types of helices mentioned are: Alpha-Helix, Helix-3, and Helix-5. In the ...
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24 views

How many proteins are common to all species? [duplicate]

Are there any proteins that are common to every Species in Earth's biosphere? If so, how many? If not, are there any proteins common to every species of an entire Kingdom? If so, how many? If not, ...
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1answer
55 views

What created the first ribosome

If a ribosome is made of protein, yet is used in protein sysnthesis, what created the first ribosome? What created the ribosomal RNA?
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1answer
61 views

What does “PDPN+ cells” means?

Are they podoplanin positive cells (cells that tested positive for podoplanin)? "...though it has been shown that podoplanin (PDPN+) cells analogous to mouse FRCs are found in human secondary ...
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1answer
33 views

Amino acid substitutions near the receptor binding site HA protein in type A H3N2 influenza strains?

I have read the scientific paper, "Substitutions Near the Receptor Binding Site Determine Major Antigenic Change During Influenza Virus Evolution" by Björn F. Koel et al (http://science.sciencemag.org/...
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Will new proteins incorporating new amino acids trigger an immune response?

This article reported that scientists have succeeded in adding two new bases to the quartet of A, C, G and T, resulting in non-canonical amino acid. Additionally, the bacteria in which this was done ...
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How to take precise/low number of cells from cell lysate? [closed]

I would like to know that how can we take low or precise number of cells from a cell lysate? (without using any protein quantification assay). Let say, If I have a cell line having cell density 5x10^...
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25 views

does Trichloroacetic acid remove fats from milk

I am trying to detect melamine in milk. As a part of preprocessing, I add 200 ul of TCA to 1 mL milk,and after filtration I get a clear solution. Does the filtrate contain fat. I feel I am having ...
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1answer
27 views

How does one predict how large of an effect on antigenic drift a substitution in the amino acid sequence of a surface protein of influenza has?

I know that some amino acid substitutions are more effective in causing antigenic drift than other substitutions based on their location in the 3d structure of the HA protein (proximity to the ...
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1answer
198 views

What is the difference between a signal peptide and a transit peptide?

From what I know, the two names are used interchangeably and I haven't found any resource which says otherwise either. Is there at all any difference, is there a transit peptide that is not a signal ...
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1k views

Are all enzymes proteins?

So throughout my education and research career I have been taught that all enzymes are proteins. This makes sense when you consider enzyme denaturing and folding/shape etc. However, I was recently ...
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1answer
40 views

How is the activation energy lowered in an enzyme by just orientating the reactants closer to one another?

If the activation energy is lowered, bond strength has decreased. How does purely orientating the reactants closer to one another lower the activation energy in a protein? The only thing I can think ...
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Quantify Protein Denaturation with Change in Solubility

I plan to run a lab which compares the impacts of ethanol and methanol, in varying concentrations, on the denaturation of whey protein. Change in water solubility is a good indicator of the degree ...
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How does DNA code for the actual *shape* of individual body parts/areas (NOT segments or Hox genes)?

Just to save the trouble - I am not asking for general information on how DNA codes for proteins and definitely not how Hox genes work. I have a very good understanding of the evolutionary process and ...
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4answers
9k views

What is the longest-lasting protein in a human body?

Protein life times are, on average, not particularly long, on a human life timescale. I was wondering, how old is the oldest protein in a human body? Just to clarify, I mean in terms of seconds/...
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1answer
124 views

Centrifuge after sonication

I follow a protocol to get protein from E.coli cells after sonication. I used to grow 6 litres of large cultures and add IPTG to express the protein. I centrifuge for 10 mins at 8,000 rpm and get the ...
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45 views

How to convert enrichment/depletion to frequency for comparing deep sequencing to sequence profile?

I have two datasets, from different sources, that I need to compare. The first set is deep sequencing results of a directed evolution experiment, where I have the naive library and selected library ...
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1answer
60 views

How do people measure how many calories or proteins/fats/сarbohydrates are in some food?

How is the composition (in fats, proteins or carbohydrates) of a certain food estimated and how is the amount of calories provided by the food calculated?
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Are there any enzymes without aromatic amino acids?

I'd like to try a new spectroscopic technique to study enzymatic reactions (which reaction doesn't especially matter, something simple and with fast kinetics like catalase would do fine - I'm just ...
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0answers
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How can we quantify the effect of pancreatin (biological enzyme) on the clarification of milk powder

Alright so I'm trying to quantify the rate at which casein (protein constituent of milk powder) is converted into a product (I am unaware of) by pancreatin (a biological enzyme that speeds up the ...
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Does every protein encoding gene necessarily have a transcription factor?

For instance, transcription factor gene A is responsible for activating gene B that encodes protein 1. However, it is possible for genes like gene B to encode proteins without having transcription ...
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121 views

How does DNA determine all of our hereditary traits?

It's my understanding that DNA codes only for protein synthesis. Does that mean that hereditary traits, like the shape of our nose, are determined only by the proportions in which various proteins are ...