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Ionizing electromagnetic waves, usually harmful to most biological beings.

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9 views

Does harm from radiation depend on exposure time?

We are trying to determine if a wireless device would be safe in terms of the radiation it emits. The device will be used next to the human torso and therefore we are looking into SAR Limits for torso....
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0answers
18 views

Effects of X-ray exposure on upcoming pregnancies

Recently we had a little fight with my girlfriend about the risks of genetic diseases for our potential baby. The thing is that she had her medical check recently and it included an X-ray examination ...
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0answers
22 views

What gives researchers a reason to test the Radiation Resistance of organisms?

I was reading about the Thermococcus Gammatolerans and its absurdly high radiation resistance, when something occurred to me. What reason did anyone have in the first place to subject this thing to ...
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1answer
101 views

What caused the Mesozoic-Cenozoic radiation?

The Phanerozoic eon has had 5 major extinction events and 3 major radiation events. After the Cambrian and Ordovician radiations came all five of the major extinction events, the last of which (...
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1answer
47 views

Are microwaves harmful to us?

They closed my question on the Physics Stack Exchange because it wasn't a purely physics question, so I'm trying here. Recently I've come across the topic of scrapping microwaves, and the various ...
4
votes
1answer
389 views

Why does UVA penetrate deeper than UVB, though it's weaker?

Even though UVA radiation ranges in longer wavelengths (315–400 nm) than UVB (280–315 nm) and thus is less energetic, UVA is able to penetrate deeper into the skin and even reach the dermis. Why is ...
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0answers
290 views

effect of infrared light to eyes and skin?

Recently some new "head mounted displays" which are wearable devices for augmented and virtual reality for industrial, research and entertainment purposes have added infrared light emitting diodes ...
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1answer
149 views

Why are fertilizers with polonium 210 used when growing tobacco?

Why are fertilizers with polonium 210 used when growing tobacco? I'm thinking of pursuing a science fair in which I create my own fertilizer for tobacco that doesn't contain polonium or lead. However,...
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3answers
49 views

How come our thyroid glands don't suffer awful mutations (or do they)?

I was listening to a lecture by my Biology professor and he said that the thyroid gland contains radioactive Iodine which can break down and create reactive Oxygen species (because ionizing radiation ...
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2answers
91 views

Is there a taxon that “adaptively” radiates faster?

It seems that there are some taxa that have a greater potential to radiate through adaptations. Off my head, I can think of birds: Darwin's finches Hawaiian honeycreepers House finches (Carpodacus ...
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1answer
55 views

Is far Infrared heaters in the market truly producing healthy far Infrared and is it practical to install them at home? [closed]

I read few blogs and websites about far infrared heaters and all are very possible about this new technology. I bought one of the heaters as a test and find quite impressive also. However, I am ...
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1answer
273 views

How do I find samples/patients in TCGA (the cancer genome atlas) that had radiation therapy?

I want to correlate the expression of a gene (for sample the KRAS gene) with survival and if the patient received radiation therapy using any suitable TCGA (the cancer genome atlas) dataset. However, ...
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1answer
561 views

Can DNA be considered as a fractal antenna?

I was reading about the consequences of using mobile phones and came across the statement that mobile phones are a potential source of cancers because DNA is a kind of a fractal antenna. The reason ...
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1answer
142 views

Can any organisms see non-electromagnetic radiation?

Some examples would be cosmic rays, neutron radiation, alpha radiation, beta radiation, muon radiation, and antimatter radiation. Some related questions: How is non-electromagnetic radiation detected,...
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1answer
984 views

Which frequency of UV light damages DNA?

I have read that UV light can damage pure DNA (DNA that has been extracted and purified). Is there a particular frequency threshold where this damage occurs or is it more of a gradient where the high ...
2
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1answer
66 views

What are the biological processes of ingesting radioactive particles?

As someone who has basic understanding/education in physics and how radiation works, there is something that is confusing me and which I would like to shed some light on (I posted about this ...
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3answers
128 views

Does cell phone radiation promote longevity?

This preprint presents results from a 2-year National Toxicology Program study on the effects of cell-phone radiation in rats. On page 8 of the PDF, survival results are presented. The presentation of ...
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2answers
770 views

Could there be any effects from low powered infrared being used to track eye movements long term?

Basically, looking into infrared LED's and a camera with an infrared bandpass filter for tracking eye movements; my concerns are whether there would be any potential negative long term effects from ...
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0answers
186 views

Is Near-infrared focused light safe for your eyes?

I found a new product, but I'm afraid it's not safe. Can you help me understand what the safety limits are when it comes to near-infrared light focused on your eyes is? I'm assuming the wavelength ...
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1answer
76 views

Why do cockroaches and flying beetles survive high levels of radiation? [closed]

Apparently it's a fact that cockroaches survive nuclear radiations. How can they survive this?
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0answers
163 views

Why bananas accumulate a radioactive isotope of potassium (K40)?

A quick google search reveals many pages that intend to calm consumers down and assure them that quantities of radioactive potassium in bananas (K40 isotope) is not sufficient to be concerned about, e....
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2answers
69 views

What is the closest possible analogue to human cells? [closed]

For an experiment, I need a specific number of cells. I will grow these cells in an incubator, and then measure the number of cells which have decayed due to the induced radiation. I am using a ...
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1answer
204 views

Question about radiation and how it affects biological systems

I'm doing research on the effects of radiation, and specifically UV, X-Ray and Gamma radiation, on biological systems at the cellular level and beyond. I understand that radiation types can be ...
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1answer
39 views

Irradiation positive effect on humans?

In research paper Euphytica 135: 187–204, 2004 it is written that: 434 mutant varieties of rice have been released with improved characters such as semi-dwarf height, early maturity, improved ...
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2answers
1k views

Can bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells be destroyed by resonance?

Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancer. Can the resonances by coordinated electromagnetic waves (and/or other forms of waves), of various frequencies, amplitudes and pulse rates, directed from ...
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2answers
176 views

Cesium-137 From Fukushima Meltdown

I've been reading up on the Fukushima nuclear meltdown and its effects it had on the environment. The iodine-131 initially released from the incident decayed after 8 days, but other isotopes such as ...
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1answer
664 views

How do electrons destroy DNA bonds in radiation?

Malignant tumors can be treated by radiation therapy. Most commonly it's radiotherapy with photons, or protons and so on. The common denominator for both types is that the radiation creates electrons ...
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1answer
366 views

Can radiation therapy cause cancer?

Radiation therapy is a very popular cancer treatment method. But can it have any risk for make a different cancer? Because i think that radiation exposure can make DNA mutation and thus increase the ...
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3answers
21k views

Does a microwave oven disinfect food?

Imagine I am preparing food -- just about to put it into a microwave oven -- and some of it falls on the floor. Assuming it got some bacteria or other organisms (viruses?) on it, will the microwave ...
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0answers
91 views

Absorbed dose from a CT scan with relation to radiation accidents

I read somewhere that the average CTDIvol in CT scans at hospitals is ~40 mGy. This translates to the 'radiation intensity' at the center of the person, and can also be roughly interpreted as an '...
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2answers
1k views

Does melanin protect humans from gamma radiation?

It is known that radiotrophic fungi use melanin to make use of gamma radiation. It is also known that melanin protects human skin from UV radiation. Thus I wonder whether melanin protects humans from ...
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1answer
339 views

Are low-intensity radio-waves carcinogenic?

A recent review article, Oxidative mechanisms of biological activity of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation reached a surprising conclusion our analysis demonstrates that low-intensity RFR [...
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1answer
2k views

What is the relationship between radiation and evolution?

There is always a certain amount of background radiation present, for example due to ionizing radiation from the sun and other stars. Also certain materials like granite may emit relatively large ...
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2answers
166 views

What level of cellular radiation is harmful for humans?

What level of radiation at the frequencies used by the cellular network(1-2 Ghz) is harmful for human health?
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1answer
487 views

How far can we go in engineering our own evolution? [closed]

After recently seeing Christopher Nolan's Interstellar and reading Kip Thorne's The Science of Interstellar, I've seriously been reflecting on the challenges mankind faces in becoming space pioneers, ...
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1answer
55 views

About modern dating techniques

In a comment to this question, it was said that Radiocarbon dating won't work. For a start the tree needs to be dead, which since you're not using the rings I'm assuming it isn't. Also the atomic ...
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1answer
72 views

About radiation therapy

With radiation therapy, could some of the radiation used cause new mutations in non-cancerous cells that are near the tumour that is being irradiated? If so could these new mutations lead to new ...
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2answers
222 views

Any benefit to low dose radiation?

Is there any survival benefit in humans that can be obtained from chronic exposure to low dose radiation, or is any dose of radiation a potential harm? Has any research been done into this?
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1answer
165 views

Is excessive hydration a risk factor for cancer in humans?

I was reading a book on radiation biology, and the book describes the process of "indirect action", where radiation can first ionize a water molecule forming a free radical, which then may interact ...
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2answers
1k views

Can we determine a person's age by dating methods or other means?

There are many sports restricted to players of a certain age (e.g. 16 and under, 18 and under, etc.) What if a person is older and fakes his birth certificate to say that he is younger? Is there any ...
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2answers
893 views

Can radiation equilevant to 1 CT (computer tomography) scan causes significant changes in human body?

I've read that CT scan causes radiation equivalent to few hundreds of ordinary X ray scan. It sound scary at the first look of it but I wonder is it the amount considered significant? Can dosage equal ...
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1answer
129 views

How well understood are the long-term effects of nuclear radiation?

Sometimes, when people are concerned about radiation, it is not because it is precisely quantified how dangerous it is, but because we don't know how dangerous it is. How well understood are the long-...
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1answer
186 views

Hair loss in a nuclear submarine? [closed]

Biologically, how prevalent is hair loss on a nuclear submarine? How can prolonged exposure to radiation levels typically present on a nuclear sub affect a person, say over a year or even more?
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1answer
44 views

DNA Fingerprint

I recently came across an article indicating that the half life of DNA in the most ideal situations is 521 years (http://www.nature.com/news/dna-has-a-521-year-half-life-1.11555). However, since human'...
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0answers
106 views

Is WIFI safe for humans? [closed]

I have wifi on at my home almost all the time. I learned that the frequency of visible light is around several hundreds of THz, while the frequency of wifi is only several GHz, which is only 1:100,000....
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1answer
48 views

Reverse tomography to create 3D scalpel

Isn't it possible to reverse tomography methods to create means to deliver heat or radiation precisely in 3D? This would be "3D scalpel" i.e. device which would be able to eradicate tumor cells ...
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2answers
400 views

Radiation and “Safe Dose”

I've read about safe doses of radiation, briefly. Why is there such a thing a safe dose? Can't any radiation give you cancer? Why is it more and more dangerous to take in larger and larger doses? Just ...
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2answers
3k views

Difference between Medical and Airport scanner radiation

What is the difference between radiation doses of a medical scanner and airport security scanner (X-Ray full body scan)? Is it the same kind of radiation? Does it pose any danger for people who fly ...
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1answer
1k views

Why does radiation sickness cause hair to fall out?

As I understand it, radiation poisoning (acute radiation syndrome) is fatal because the radiation kills cells. However, why do victims experience hair loss at such an early stage in the process?
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1answer
1k views

Why are women more susceptible to radiation?

The answer to this question on the Space.SE indicates women are more susceptible to radiation in space than men. Why is this the case? Is it merely that women have less muscle mass (which being more ...