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Questions tagged [red-blood-cell]

Questions pertaining to red blood cells, or erythrocytes, the most common type of blood cell that is responsible for delivering oxygen throughout the body.

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12 views

How does EPO get into the human body and how does it affect the body

How does EPO get into the human body and how does it affect the body? I would like to get a detailed explanation of how EPO gets into our system and starts to boost the production of red blood cells. ...
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1answer
29 views

Why is sickle cell trait expressed in half of all cells rather than all cells containing half-sickled haemoglobin

If sickle cell trait is due to be heterozygous with respect to a single gene mutation on the haemoglobin β-globin chain, why is it the case that ~50% of RBCs are sickled rather than half of the ...
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27 views

Why haven't humans been able to make blood producing vats?

There are people in hospitals in life threatening circumstances that need blood packages, and they fully depend on blood donors' blood. With our current technology, we have been able to "persuade" ...
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34 views

What are the consequences of less DARC expression as a result of a Duffy weak allele?

According to codegen.eu I'm a carrier of a Duffy weak allele. For SNP rs34599082 I have alleles C and T. T is a rare allele that found is less thatn ~1% of the population. Codegen.eu directs me to ...
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1answer
56 views

Non-nucleated cell-like population with RNA

We're working on invertebrate hemolymph (blood) and we have found with flow cytometry (staining with DRAQ5) a cell-like population without nucleus but it has RNA production. Does anyone any ...
3
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1answer
147 views

Why are red blood cells not attacked by NK cells?

All cells containing a nucleus present MHC-I, while some specialized cells present MHC-II in addition to that. Since erythrocytes lack any MHC why do natural killer cells not attack them? It is my ...
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19 views

How are codocytes or target cells formed?

How are codocytes or target cells formed in conditions like Thalassemia? And why do they appear like a target(as in why is there a central red surrounded by pallor surrounded by red?)
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1answer
67 views

How do veins's valve pocket sinus tend to become hypoxic?

For context, this question relates to the formation of deep vein thrombosis as I read that hypoxemia in vein can trigger coagulation cascade and cause a thrombus to form in vein. I read that vein's ...
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23 views

Question on compatibility of blood groups [duplicate]

How come a person with blood group O can donate to a person with blood group AB? Since there are A and B antibodies in the O blood group blood surely this would cause agglutination in the blood of the ...
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2answers
500 views

Why does B12 deficiency enlarge red blood cells?

I'd like to know why B12 deficiency enlarge red blood cells
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1answer
105 views

Where do Red Blood Cells use energy?

I know that RBCs use glycolysis of glucose to lactate to produce most of their energy, but, if they are just carrier cells, where do they use the energy?
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155 views

Why can humans tolerate eating onions but other mammals like dogs and cats cannot?

Onions are one of the many foods we shouldn't feed our pets. Looking it up, I learned that onions cause hemolytic anemia in MANY species: cattle, sheep, horses, dogs, cats, and even some primates. If ...
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1answer
190 views

Why is there a layer of moist lining the inner walls of alveoli?

I'm taught that the walls of the alveoli are moist, so gaseous oxygen molecules can dissolve into this water. This then allows the dissolved oxygen (liquid state) to diffuse faster from the alveoli ...
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2answers
102 views

Do blood cells immediately die after leaving the body?

I am wondering, do blood cells die right after they leave the body?
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1answer
286 views

Why do musk deer have the smallest red blood cells and amphibians have the largest?

What is the reason that musk deer have the smallest red blood cells and amphibians have the largest? Should they not be proportionate to the size of the organism?
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380 views

Why is erythropoietin produced in the kidney?

Erythropoietin is a hormone produced in the kidney to stimulate the generation of more red blood cell. It is triggered by low oxygen via HIF transcription factors. Makes sense. Oops, oxygen is low, ...
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1answer
71 views

Red Blood Cell Size Vs White Blood Cell Size

I have just found out that white blood cells are larger than red blood cells and now I'm confused due to something I learnt in class. Basically, I was taught that there were spaces between the ...
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2answers
99 views

Is too much CO2 in the air toxic?

I know that if there is too much CO2 in the air we will have too much greenhouse effect. I would like to know if there is too much CO2 in the room, something like 3% while there is also more that ...
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4answers
3k views

Are red blood cells prokaryotic?

After searching "do antibiotics impact the immune system" I found out that antibiotics target prokaryotic cells. It all made a lot of sense thinking about all those yogurt recommendations you get ...
3
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1answer
112 views

What would the RBCs of someone heterozygous for sickle cell anemia look like?

Would half of the RBCs look normal, and the other half sickled? Or would all of the RBCs have slight deformation/sickling? Thanks!
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65 views

Why there are no RBCs in lymphatic vessels?

I know the following. Leukocytes (white blood cells) are made in the bone marrow, and naive leukocytes go to the blood vessels. So, leukocytes mainly exist in blood vessels. Endothelial cells ...
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1answer
205 views

Osmosis in red blood cells and bacteria

This is a question from an exam in my biology course. Bacterial cells and human red blood cells were inserted into one solution. Upon testing one hour later the blood cells exploded, while the ...
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2answers
1k views

Why isn’t Haemoglobin a plasma protein, rather than being encompassed by the erythrocyte?

Erythrocytes (red blood cells) are a common feature of almost all vertebrates. What evolutionary advantage do they provide in containing haemoglobin, rather than it being just a plasma protein? In ...
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2answers
2k views

Why does Anti-A antibodies make type-A blood type clump?

A-type blood has B-antibodies; it also clumps anti-A antibodies are inserted. Why is that? The blood has no antibodies against the A-antibodies to make clump in this way.
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413 views

Is carbon dioxide dissolved in plasma same as carbonic acid?

Carbon dioxide is transported through blood via 3 methods : 1. Dissolved in plasma 2. As bicarbonate ion 3.through RBCs. The carbondioxide when transported as bicarbonate ion i.e HCO3- and H+. What ...
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1answer
2k views

Sickle cell life span

How long do sickle red blood cells "live" before being broken down in phagocytosis? I had trouble doing a normal search as it brings up life span of those inflicted with the disease. Also, I have ...
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1answer
1k views

Is erythropoietin released when breaking down RBCs

I came across the MCQ in my physiology book, it says: Erythropoietin..... i) may decrease the life span of RBCs. ii) is not released on breakdown of RBCs. iii) may stimulate the stem ...
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1answer
803 views

Effect of hemoglobin on colloidal osmotic pressure

If Hemoglobin gets out of RBCs, my book says that colloidal osmotic pressure of plasma increases. Hence, filtration of fluid across capillaries is prevented. So the heart increases its work to be ...
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1answer
2k views

Picture of a camel's red blood cells

I'm an art student in need of a little help. I'm looking for microscopic pictures of camel's red blood cells, I need their shape for an art project. The pictures I find on Google seem a little ...
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0answers
243 views

Why do erythrocytes have no MHC1 but platelets do?

Red blood cells do not have a considerable number of MHC1 through their membranes, and that's explained by them not having a nucleus. But why do platelets have MHC1s if they have no nucleus either? I ...
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3k views

Why women have high Erythrocyte sedimentation rate? [closed]

Why ESR (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate) 1. higher in women 2. increases with age 3. increases in pregnancy, infection, malignancies what I thought so far : since women are menstruating so there ...
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1answer
90 views

Blood transfusion

Can we exchange the antigen present on membrane of RBC's so that it can be transfused from one person to other ? As we face problem to find required bloodgroup at the time of emergency especially O ...
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2answers
5k views

Why do people with type O blood have anti-A and anti-B antibodies?

People with type O blood have anti-A and anti-B antibodies, even without receiving a transfusion. Why?
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Non-splenic pools of erythrocytes?

In splenectomized animals, where could red blood cells be released from, to explain an increased hematocrit after exercise or muscular contractions?
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2answers
155 views

Are there any exceptional cases in which a person with O negative blood group cannot donate?

Are there any exceptional cases in which a person with O negative blood group cannot donate or any case in which compatibility might not be established between O negative an any other blood group?
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1answer
1k views

Hemoglobin oxygen affinity curve

I have a general understanding of the Bohr effect, and that Hemoglobin's affinity for oxygen will shift depending on the conditions of the lungs and tissues. However, I'm struggling with the following ...
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2answers
826 views

Does the red blood cell in frogs undergo amitosis?

It is a notion particularly popular among Chinese high school Biology textbooks, that the red blood cells in frogs can undergo amitosis (not mitosis), a claim which I have not been able to find ...
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1answer
3k views

Why are red blood cells preferred to study the structure of plasma membrane?

If we wanted to study the structure of a plasma membrane, why are red blood cells a more attractive cell type to work with than other cell types such as liver cells or kidney cells?
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38 views

Iron deficiency anemia [duplicate]

It is said that iron deficiency anemia is characterised by microcytic-hypochromic RBCs. I would like to ask how iron deficiency causes decrease in the volume of RBCs? If the volume is decreasing ...
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3answers
10k views

Why do red blood cells maintain Iron in the Haem group in the +2 (ferrous) oxidation state?

A lot of sources tell me that RBCs contain a number of enzymes, and that these serve multiple functions from maintaining the structure and elasticity of the corpuscle wall, to preventing the oxidation ...
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2answers
25k views

Why and where do red blood cells die?

Textbooks commonly state that red blood cells are removed by the liver and spleen. Do those organs destroy the red blood cells within capillaries that course through those organs or are they ...
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1answer
216 views

Plant cell question in age 12 science test Part II [closed]

I'm a parent and I think the teacher had been a bit harsh with marking most of these questions but can someone help me answer the very last question on the paper please (where someone has written SP ...
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1answer
4k views

Why is the Pentose Phosphate Pathway so active in erythrocytes?

Is it because glyceraldehyde -3-phosphate (a molecule which when enter glycolysis help produce ATP through substrate level phosphorylation) can be prepared without losing an ATP through this process?
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1answer
340 views

distribution of some injected materials/medicines through blood vessels [closed]

Fastest distribution of some injected materials/medicines & with no risk of any kind can be achieved by injecting it into - artery or vein?
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1answer
105 views

What is the reason for 'microcytic' anaemia?

I know the causes for microcytic anaemia are Fe deficiency, prolonged inflammation, Thalessemia, Sideroblastic etc. All these logically point to a decrease in Haemoglobin synthesis - either Haeme or ...
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1answer
395 views

Blood antigens and immune response

In my textbook, the definition of an antigen is written as follows: Antigen: A substance that the body recognises as foreign and that can evoke an immune response The following image also confused ...
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1answer
911 views

How do stem cells produce 200 billion new blood cells every day? Does 1 stem cell division result in production of just 1 blood cell or many?

It is given on wikipedia that everyday 200 billion new blood cells are produced in the bone marrow. I want to understand how this is achieved. Does one hematopoietic stem cell's single division result ...
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2answers
11k views

Do camels have nucleated RBCs or enucleated RBCs?

Most mammals have enucleated RBCs as an adaptation to facilitate the transport of oxygen. My text says that camels and llamas are exceptions to these. I was wondering why they are exceptions, and the ...
3
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0answers
225 views

Coagulation of blood in small intestine due to trypsin

Trypsin is secreted in the small intestine to convert proteins into dipeptides i.e. to carry out digestion of proteins. However, it is also a coagulating agent which coagulates blood by hydrolysing ...
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1answer
888 views

Identifying an Unknown Blood Type [closed]

The following case study has a student working with blood samples to identify their blood types (A, B, AB, and O). Consider the situation and answer the questions. A student is given eight ...