Questions tagged [senses]

The physiological mechanisms by which organisms perceive their environment.

20 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4 votes
0 answers
25k views

Are there animals / mammals which only have one eye?

Do all animals (of a certain size and not thinking about worms) have the possibility to perceive depth? Do all mammals have at least two eyes? Are there mammals with more than two eyes?
Martin Thoma's user avatar
  • 1,625
3 votes
0 answers
207 views

Empty room, Room full with stuffs & Auditory adaptation to reflection of sounds

Background When a room is full with stuffs like furniture, electronic utilities, books etc. it's hard to hear reflections of sounds made by us (talking, playing an instrument, sound from falling ...
Mockingbird's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
26 views

What Type of Color Vision do Mantises have?

I am trying to figure out what type of color vision mantises have, but stuff about mantis shrimp keeps coming up instead. All I was able to find was this one paper from 1971. It found evidence that ...
E Tam's user avatar
  • 842
2 votes
0 answers
38 views

Does acuity of a re-mapped region of cortex depend on the need of the animal to resolve between two closely related stimuli?

From my informal research so far, I've learned that cortical magnification is evident in at least the visual cortex and the somatosensory cortex. My question is the following: If there were a ...
Joebevo's user avatar
  • 849
2 votes
0 answers
31 views

Efficacy of sonic kangaroo deterrents

Bender (2003) tested the efficacy of sonic kangaroo deterrents. Their device is static (and apparently ineffective). Has there been any rigorous testing of the whistle-like 'kangaroo deterrent' ...
Areel Xocha's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
40 views

Is perception contrast based?

If I understand it correctly, humans can discriminate shades and colours based on their inherent contrast, as in we can see colors because there are different colors. Same for shades and for acoustic ...
B.Swan's user avatar
  • 283
2 votes
0 answers
786 views

Is there a meaningful difference between direct and indirect light

I don't see a basis for a distinction, but I've heard several people distinguish between direct and indirect light for people, claiming that indirect light would be better in many cases. "Direct" ...
Christos Hayward's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
50 views

How does kinesthetic work and with what do we sense this?

I know that kinesthetic and proprioception are different things but, in contrast to proprioception, I don't know how kinesthetic works. A broad explaination as well as very specific(but explained ...
Jeroentetje3's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
5k views

Pitch shift in hearing after wisdom teeth removal

Yesterday I had my wisdom teeth removed. This morning, when I heard our phone ringing, it sounded a little lower-pitched than usual (I have perfect pitch). Sure enough, when I opened FL Studio (music-...
Drew McGowen's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
444 views

External sensory stimuli that awaken a person from sleep

An external sound or touch can awaken someone. Can a light? It would have to be very strong, but part of the reason might be that it would have to penetrate the eyelids. And can a smell or taste? ...
h34's user avatar
  • 227
1 vote
0 answers
57 views

Which animals can see (or feel) the Moon’s infrared radiation?

The luminosity (bolometric) of the Moon in infrared is several times greater that its luminosity in visible light. Moreover, it may be rather possible for the Moon to be obscured by some fog or haze ...
Incnis Mrsi's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
283 views

Why bipolar neurons in retina transfer information via graded potentials?

Why should bipolar cells prefer graded potentials to action potentials? My attempt: I know that graded potentials are better in processing information since stimulus is directly proportional to ...
JM97's user avatar
  • 4,796
1 vote
0 answers
275 views

Are Sharks able to detect electromagnetic waves using their Electroreception ability?

I will include some publications and links that may help. I could not concluded an answer with my limited knowledge on the subject. Shark Passive electroreception sensitive to low frequency (below 50 ...
Hammar's user avatar
  • 342
1 vote
0 answers
255 views

Why are interneurons needed in the spinal cord for polysynaptic reflexes and somatosensory tracts to the brain?

The single explanation I found for the polysynaptic reflex is that the interneuron diverges into more pathways, such as the efferent motor neuron, the inhibitory neuron to the opposite extensor muscle,...
Remus Cristian's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
702 views

Factors for sensitivity to electric shock

I'm frequently getting electric shocks in my office when touching things. I basically know why this happens and how to avoid it. Still I started to wonder what would be the best way to touch ...
André Stannek's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

How to pit viper pits maintain high sensitivity across a wide temperature range?

Pit viper infrared vision works nothing like our photochemical rods and cones. It would be blinded by its own thermal noise it if did. Instead, they are sensitive to changes of temperature [of only ...
Kevin Kostlan's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Is there a detailed model of the resonance of the basilar membrane and excitation patterns of hair cells?

I've read that it's generally understood that deeper parts of the cochlea are sensitized to lower frequencies, and regions closer to the oval window are sensitive to high frequencies. In a sense, a ...
trbabb's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
197 views

Do all animals with eyesight get an upside-down image on their retina, or is it right-side up with some?

here's as good an image as any for showing the thing about human vision that I am asking about: So, our retina gets an upside-down image. My question is, do all animals' eyes work this way? Or do ...
Hamish Todd's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
60 views

Can creatures that can see color in completely different visible spectrum exists?

From wikipedia - "The visible spectrum is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye." So humans can see the light from 400-700 nm and this is because our eyes can ...
Combine's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
96 views

Is there a lower temperature limit, below which we cannot sense a difference in temperature?

At work I have to handle samples stored at -20 and -70 degrees Celsius, and they don't feel that different to me.
Ahmed Abdullah's user avatar