Questions tagged [terminology]

How terms are used or the meaning of words as used in scientific literature. Questions should ideally include a link or quote as context for where the term was encountered.

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6
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4answers
18k views

Where does the term "cos site" come from?

The word cosmid is derived from cos sites of lambda phages. Why are cos sites called cos sites? What does this "cos" refer to?
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1answer
86 views

Understanding the use of English tenses in biological journal articles

My colleague and I (second language speakers) got in an argument in understanding the sentence: " however, how this complexity and diversification have been achieved remains rather poorly ...
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2answers
51 views

Cancer: what does it mean "at presentation"?

Unclear to me what this means: "Objective The biological heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes prognosis difficult. We translate the results of a genome-wide high-throughput ...
2
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1answer
132 views

Do biologists use the word "solubilize" to mean "dissolve"?

I work with biologists who often use the word "solubilize" to mean "dissolve". Is this correct usage? I keep correcting them (I'm not a biologist, but I help with writing), and we'...
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1answer
265 views

A word that includes plants and fungi, but not animals [closed]

Hello biologists and biology enthusiasts! I am working on a project which includes information about plants and fungi. It would be very helpful for me if there a word that means plants-and-fungi, but ...
4
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1answer
77 views

Structure and reactions of the cofactors of oxidoreductases such as ferredoxin

I have seen the word flavoprotein being used in place of ferredoxin in few places and vice-versa. I have not found any source that mentions them both together and explains the relation between them. ...
3
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1answer
105 views

Is there a term for the opposite of intergenic?

I am looking for a term that describes DNA regions that overlap genes, i.e., non-intergenic DNA regions. For example, say I am writing a paper about DNA-binding sites (i.e., DNA sequences that ...
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2answers
109 views

What's the difference between the terms "muscle" and "muscle organ"?

Foundational Model of Anatomy distinguishes between Muscle organ and Muscle. What's the difference between the two?
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2answers
46 views

Meaning of "stripped" in "stripped antibody-depleted sera"

From a research paper: FOLR1 autoantibody detection The assay for identification of the presence and relative quantification of FOLR1 autoantibodies in serum samples was performed as previously ...
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1answer
10 views

Meaning of the word "targeted" in a description of chromatin immunoprecipitation

From a research paper: The ChIP assay demonstrated that CIC physically binds to the promoter region of FOLR1, PCFT and RFC1. Compared with IgG control antibody, CIC antibody enriched 4.1-fold more ...
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3answers
8k views

Is a walnut a nut or a drupe?

We've been learning about fruits (and the various categories thereof) in class; among them we have the nut and the drupe. My textbook differentiates between those terms as: Nut: It is a single-seeded ...
2
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1answer
106 views

Why is an intron (or exon) still called intron (exon) if retained in (excluded from) mRNA?

In most explanations, the sections of RNA removed during splicing are called introns, and the remaining segments that are stitched together are called exons. That is, introns and exons are defined in ...
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3answers
2k views

Are all carcinogens mutagens?

I assume that all carcinogens must be mutagens, but I've read that this is not the case. However, I can't find any good examples or an explanation of why it is not the case. How can a non-mutagenic ...
2
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2answers
7k views

Difference between pipette and pipettor

I've been translating a text listing some analytical laboratory equipment, and found that some fellow translators translate the Russian word "автоматическая пипетка" (avtomaticheskaya pipetka, which ...
21
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2answers
5k views

Why should a tumor look like a crab?

Origin of the word "cancer" The disease was first called cancer by Greek physician Hippocrates (460-370 BC). He is considered the “Father of Medicine”. Hippocrates used the terms carcinos and ...
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1answer
334 views

What’s the Difference Between Grass and Sedge?

What’s the difference between grasses and sedges? in terms of anatomy and classification.
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4answers
7k views

Is "computational biology" different from "bioinformatics"?

Are "computational biology" and "bioinformatics" simply different terms for the same thing or is there a real difference?
4
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0answers
108 views

Why plant tissues end in -enchyma?

Many plant tissue types end in the affix -enchyma. Etymology: enkhyma "infusion," from en- "in" + khein "to pour" Examples are parenchyma, collenchyma, and sclerenchyma....
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0answers
122 views

Why is the "mango fly" called a "mango fly"?

Cordylobia anthropophaga, the mango fly, tumbu fly, tumba fly, putzi fly, or skin maggot fly, is a species of blow-fly common in East and Central Africa. Wiki page Why is Cordylobia anthropophaga ...
2
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1answer
41 views

What does 21q21.1-q21.2 mean?

I am reading a journal paper about the association between NCAM2 and autism, and I have come across the following: We performed microarray analysis and identified a 1.6-Mb deletion of 21q21.1-q21.2, ...
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0answers
34 views

What is the thinnest spot on the ilium called?

Is there a specific name for the spot on the human iliac fossa where the bone is the thinnest? (Or, is there a name for the thickness measurement of that spot, e.g. the left/right _________ is 2.1mm?) ...
0
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2answers
116 views

What are the stretch of amino acids?

I found the words "stretch of amino acids" in a newspaper article. "This lipopeptide matches the stretch of amino acids in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 exactly." What is the &...
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1answer
64 views

What does allelomorph mean?

Is there any difference between allele and allelomorph since most websites call them the same. If they are same then why two different term?
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1answer
67 views

Is there term for thermophilic-halophilic plants and if so, what is it?

I know that in botany there is a wide classification for plants that can survive in hot deserts (semi-arid or arid) and harsh climates such as 4-season countries with a tendency to droughts each year (...
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1answer
41 views

When there is incomplete dominance of one allele, is one allele still considered recessive?

When you have incomplete dominance between two alleles of a gene (say, on two different tail lengths blending into an intermediate tail length or two rose colours blending together), can you still ...
4
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2answers
3k views

Vitamins — how did they get their names?

There are several types of vitamins. A,B,C,D,E,H,K,P, etc. How did they get their names?
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0answers
31 views

Could be misleading using some terms to describe certain phenomena?

I am implementing a series of comparative analyses related to Low Complexity Regions in some organisms. Given that these regions show a wide range of length (measured in amino acids) and different ...
6
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1answer
4k views

Why is aconitase classified as a lyase?

Aconitase in the TCA (tricarboxylic acid) cycle isomerizes citric acid to isocitric acid via cis-aconitic acid intermediate. Since overall it functions as an isomerase, why it does not belong to ...
0
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1answer
39 views

What is meant by [protein name]+/- (ie "Myod+" and "Myod-")

I have read a paper where this notation for protein names is used: Myod+ and Myod- (or another example, Myog+, Myog-). What does this indicate? In the paper I'm reading, and some brief googling, it ...
4
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3answers
440 views

What could I call such nucleic-acid-Sequence? A sort of palindromic sequence? is there any term called mirror repeat?

5'... ATGCC|CCGTA ...3' 3'... TACGG|GGCAT ...5' or say 5'... AAGT|TGAA ...3' 3'... TTCA|ACTT ...5' or in generalised way; on each strand; ABCDEF|FEDCBA Is there any terminology for such-sort ...
2
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0answers
49 views

Clarification for the anatomical terminology of the cerebellum

I've been trying to find descriptions for some of the fissures found on the inferior surface of the cerebellum, and so far the only source I've been able to find that provides an adequate description ...
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1answer
70 views

What exactly is "lateral septum"?

I came across the phrase lateral septum and I can't seem to find the precise definition online. Is it "the areas roughly to the right and the left of the septum pellucidum"? Or is it the ...
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2answers
74 views

Is there a nomenclature for human physiology?

Back when I studied botany in high school, the teacher taught us the nomenclature for botanical terms. I think there should be something similar for human physiology. Understanding how the name was ...
0
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1answer
37 views

What are "intrinsic hypothalamic fibers"? (From an article on neuronal mechanisms of sexual desire)

I came across the phrase intrinsic hypothalamic fibers which I cannot understand. What is meant by intrinsic - that these fibers (long myelinated axons?) start in the hypothalamus? Or that they start ...
5
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2answers
2k views

What does the root "phyllum" mean used botanical binomial nomenclature

I often encounter the root "phyllum" in binomial names in botany, but I've had trouble finding an actual definition for this root in any Latin dictionary outside of its taxonomic meaning. From context ...
0
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2answers
76 views

What is the defining characteristics of a Gap Species?

For the following competitive exam question: A road is constructed through a tropical rain forest, following which a population of a species of butterflies declines. Which of the following is NOT a ...
4
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1answer
390 views

Difference between dysentery and bloody diarrhea

The difference between diarrhoea and dysentery is quite clear; but the appearance of blood in stool or bloody diarrhoea is a very confusing term when compared with dysentery. Are they different in the ...
3
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1answer
524 views

RNA polymerase Sigma subunit: transcription factor, coenzyme, or what?

Studying prokaryotic transcription, it seems that the α2ββ′ω core enzyme + the sigma (σ) subunit comprise the ‘holoenzyme’ required for prokaryotic transcription. In traditional enzyme nomenclature, ...
13
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5answers
19k views

Why is the opposite of plantar flexion called "dorsiflexion"?

Why is the action of flexing the foot so that the toes move anteriorly/superiorly (i.e. in the direction opposite that which they move during plantar flexion) described as "dorsiflexion?" In the same ...
20
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3answers
5k views

Can 'human' become a genus due to space colonization?

I have read that during the Second World War, some mosquitoes got trapped in the London underground railway system. The mosquitoes never got out and eventually they became a new species by themselves. ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Are “tremors” and “ tetanic contractions” the same thing?

Do these two expressions have the same meaning? 1- Tetanic contractions in the skeletal muscles 2- Rythmic shaking of the hands (These two expressions are supposed to be two symptoms of Parkinson’s ...
0
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2answers
66 views

Meaning of "standard reactions" in a DNA extraction procedure description

From a DNA extraction procedure description (an in-house pharma document I'm translating into Russian): Preparation of Standards All the standard reactions should be prepared at least in duplicates. ...
15
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3answers
5k views

Is a DNA molecule a single strand of polynucleotide or two of them linked together?

Our molecular biology teacher told us that a double helix of DNA was composed of two DNA molecules linked together by hydrogen bonds. The thing is, until now, I always thought a DNA molecule was ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Meaning of "optical" in "Optical cap, 8X Strip" (used in qPCR)

I'm translating an English document that lists equipment used in a qPCR procedure: Reagents/Materials Optical cap, 8X Strip I googled and found that the meaning of this line is "a strip of 8 ...
15
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3answers
59k views

What is the difference between an antibiotic and an antibacterial?

Concerning medicine, what are the differences between antibiotics and antibacterials?
2
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2answers
3k views

Explanation of the ‘cherry red spot' in Tay Sachs disease

In Tay Sachs disease, a hallmark symptom is a cherry red spot in the macula of the eye surrounded by a halo of white. I understand that the ganglion cells, which are higher in numbers around the ...
3
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1answer
119 views

What is a "fairy smile"?

From Hrdy and Burkart (2020): At birth, both chimpanzee and human newborns seek out eyes, are capable of mutual gazing, and caught just right, may imitate someone else’s outstretched tongue or other ...
0
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1answer
184 views

What is the difference between floral primordia and floral buds?

As we know an axillary bud differentiates to form a floral bud, but what is a floral primodium?

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