Questions tagged [virology]

Virology deals with the study of viruses, infectious entities that require the machinery of a host cell to replicate.

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Is PrEP used for anything other than HIV?

In the field of HIV prevention, PrEP is an abbreviation of pre-exposure prophylaxis. This is a very generic term. Are any diseases other than HIV prevented using a similar approach? Do they use the ...
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Air purifier agains bacteria and viruses?

We would buy a mobile air purifier in our home. Against the smoke of the city, etc. It would have a HEPA + activated carbon filter. They are marketing it as: "filtration process captures 99.97%...
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Can 2019-nCoV infect you thru eyes?

Is it likely for 2019-nCoV to infect through the eyes?
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Ought you wear googles to protect against 2019-nCoV? [closed]

These Reddit comments suggest that 2019-nCoV can infect you thru the eyes. So ought you wear goggles if you're in affected areas? Cathay Pacific flight attendants are finally allowed to wear masks ...
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Is the Common Cold an Immune Overreaction?

It's my understanding that the majority of symptoms associated with the common cold (runny nose, inflamed sinus, slight fever) are essentially the result of the immune system's response. I've never ...
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How could viruses evolve?

I know that Viruses are really complex generally, but what makes me wonder is, how they evolved. As an example, I first use a giraffe. The neck got really long so she could reach the leafes on the ...
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How do we know that mild forms of rabies are nonexistent?

Wikipedia's rabies article says: "Death usually occurs 2 to 10 days after first symptoms. Survival is almost unknown once symptoms have presented, even with the administration of proper and intensive ...
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389 views

Body's response to second dengue attack

I have read in wikipedia that the first dengue virus infection is cleared by the body very easily. The second infection, however, is dangerous. How does body fight second infection, or does it has any ...
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Can a bacterium express a virulence gene and not produce toxins and what may be the cause of this?

I am preparing a seminar on viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state in bacteria, mainly foodborne pathogens and I just saw this line in a journal article by Lothigius et al that "the expression of the ...
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What are the secondary structure requirements for cell-penetrating peptides AKA protein transduction domains

Cell penetrating peptides. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a class of short amino acid sequences which are sufficient for crossing cell membranes and delivering themselves along with any ...
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How do mutations of viruses lead to drug resistance?

For instance, after starting zidovudine monotherapy against HIV, resistance develops against the drug because of a point mutation in the RNA transcriptase enzyme to which the drug binds. So how does ...
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Is it possible for a parasitic wasp to alter the behaviour of its host after emerging from it?

I know that parasitic wasp larvae can live for a long time inside their live host (eg. caterpillar), but I always thought that they kill the host when they eventually get out of it. But I've seen a ...
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Example of a virus becoming symbiotic with an organism

The human gut has an indispensably beneficial ecosystem of bacteria. What are the examples of a virus that becomes symbiotic with an organism, or even incorporates beneficially into the genome of the ...
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Is there an 'anti-virus'?

A virus spreads around and usually attaches itself to the host, multiplies & causes diseases. But is there something like an anti-virus? A single celled entity that does the opposite: spreads ...
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flavivirus virus genome, methylated guanine

I'm looking at the sequence of a flavivirus virus genome (mRNA). Kindly see the link MH900227.1. How can I identify the Guanine nucleotide that is methylated in the capping process? Thanks,
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Can you design a bacteriophage that attacks the part of the bacteria that makes them antibiotics resistant?

I read in a newspaper about a case where they had found a virus that could attack a specific form of antibiotics-resistant bacteria and managed to save a girl from a certain death by "infecting her" ...
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Could bacteria and phages be found in tissues?

in the literature, there are several studies of the gut virome and microbiome, for instance Reyes et al. on Nature (https://www.nature.com/articles/nature09199?error=cookies_not_supported&code=...
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Viruses selected by evolution

I had a conversation with a family member who is a bio-computer-scientist and he talked to me about what his colleagues (biologist) are doing and I feel confused about it. They work in Chile and are ...
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Why is the ability of a virus to get crystallized considered as a “Non living feature of a virus”?

My book states that the fact that :"Viruses can be crystallized" is a proof of their "Non living character" Does that mean living things cannot be crystallized? If yes, why is that so?
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How are viruses isolated?

I read several different articles about virology, including the Wikipedia article on viruses and none of them explain how a virus is isolated. Some talk of injecting a virus into a chicken egg, but ...
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Can cell mediated immune response be transferred via blood transfusion

I read that human body can develop cell mediated immunity to viral infections and subsequently clear the virus. For example, people clear warts through cell mediated immune response against the wart ...
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Is there a minimum load below which an infectious agent will not cause disease?

Suppose a single smallpox virus is injected in an human adult's body. Will it cause disease in the host? Is there a minimum microbial load below which it will not cause disease?
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Why we don't have vaccination against all diseases which are caused by microbes?

People can be vaccinated against certain diseases. Principle of vaccination is to use live attenuated load or inactivated. My question is - why we dont have vaccination against all diseases which are ...
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Why are human feces riskier than urine with regard to spreading diseases?

I came across a Wikipedia article titled "Urine diversion". It explains different ways, including using special diversionary toilets, and treating the collection of human feces and urine separately as ...
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What is the purpose of getting a rabies vaccine after exposure?

After exposure to the virus, it is already inside you and your immune system will start to recognize it. Is the vaccine then just a way to kickstart this process so the body can fight off the ...
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Enzyme inhibitors against common cold viruses

Would some inhibitors of viral enzymes work against common cold viruses? Are there any studies? What could a treatment look like? A lot of common cold viruses are rhino viruses which are picorna ...
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Can a vaccine or antidote be administrated via gases or sprays?

On TV or in movies a gas or spray containing a vaccine/cure/antitoxin is released and everybody is saved. Is this something plausible in real life? Specific examples would be appreciated.
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Species diversity in cheese and yoghurt?

There have been studies on the number of species on humans and in various other environments. I was wondering how many species including: viruses, bacteria, yeasts, and fungi inhabit ordinary farm ...
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What does 'virus prototype strain' mean?

Does the term 'prototype virus strain' mean the first virus isolated and without mutations?
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In marine DNA viral diversity studies, what would “paradigm of rampant mosaicism” refer to?

The recent paper in Cell Marine DNA Viral Macro- and Microdiversity from Pole to Pole describes the (huge) new Global Ocean Viromes 2.0 (GOV 2.0) dataset. In the Results and Discussion section, the ...
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Heritable immunity and smallpox vaccination [duplicate]

As I understand it, lack of heritable immunity caused smallpox to wipe out certain communities of native Americans. If vaccination conveys heritable immunity to a population, shouldn’t this make ...
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Why do people say that smallpox has been eradicated?

I keep reading things like “smallpox has been eradicated” or “there are only two samples of the virus left in existence in a lab somewhere”, but couldn’t there be a bunch of smallpox viruses in an ...
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What does the gene name “lexA” stand for?

It is an important gene expressed in E. coli that represses the SOS response and also the expression of lambda lytic phase genes. UV light and damage to DNA is responsible for its breakdown and hence ...
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What virus properties affect their airborne contagiousness?

What properties of a virus affect it's ability to be transmitted by air? I assume it must be able to withstand different temperatures and be smallish in size? For example why is influenza very ...
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How do I tell if the mosquitos in my New York City apartment can carry Zika?

The species that carries Zika, A. aegypti, is unlikely to be found in New York. However, the related species A. albopictus is prevalent and quite concerning. So this question is focusing on A. ...
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Insight on HPV vaccine to prevent/control reactivation of latent infections in those already infected

Some women experience reactivation of HPV infection in their 50's due to weakened immune system and weakened immune memory. Is it outside the realm of possibility that giving the HPV vaccine to those ...
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In HIV-1, what produces Tat?

The Trans-activator of transcription (Tat) plays a crucial role in regulating the transcription process of HIV-1. But which state of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) produces Tat? Is it the "...
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Why is HPV vaccines targeted for preteens?

Why is human papillomavirus products targeted to children before sexual activeness? Could all ages benefit from this vaccine even if they may have or have not contracted a form of HPV to prevent other ...
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Can cancers caused due to viruses be contagious?

Generally, viruses are infectious in nature and there are several cancer-causing viruses that are known (i.e. oncovirus) My question is: Are these oncoviruses infectious in nature? If so, what is the ...
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Why are viruses considered to be non-living? [duplicate]

Viruses are widely known as disease and illness-causing agents that can spread quickly through living organisms. They are considered to be non-living due to their unique characteristics.
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Can viruses pass through sweat pores?

I have read somewhere that viruses and other microbes can not penetrate skin but what about sweat pores? Can viruses pass through these pores?
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Computer Virus that infects DNA?

I have watched a talk by Mikko Hypponen (CEO of the security company F-Secure) called Silicon Plague. There, roughly at minute 51 of the talk, he mentions a computer code that is supposed to be able ...
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Why isn't a virus “alive”?

The recent news about a new supermassive virus being discovered got me thinking about how we define viruses as non-living organisms whilst they are bigger than bacteria, and much more complex than we ...
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Risks of latent viruses that reside in ancient genomes under research?

Some interesting research in reactivating mammoth genetic material (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-40546-1) made me wonder what risks are inherent (or are not inherent) in reviving older ...
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Is there a known mutation of an insertion type that prevents being infected by a virus?

Recently there was big news about the mutation CCR5 delta 32, that prevents HIV from infecting white blood cells, that was a deletion type of a mutation. Do we know of an insertion type of mutation ...
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Which cells are prefered by the HIV virus to establish an infection?

We always read that HIV infects CD4 cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. However, is it a common event for HIV to infect non-immune cells within a host? If not, why? And also if not, why are ...
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For how long would a flu-contaminated parcel be an effective disease vector?

A parcel has been delivered and contaminated by a person who has the flu. For how long would the parcel be an effective disease vector?
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How do viral vaccines work?

I have read that a vaccine against a pathogen typically works by using a dead or weakened version of that pathogen and then inciting an immune response against the pathogen so that the immune system ...