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Results tagged with Search options user 28022

The discussion of the anatomy and evolution of eyes. Consider using the "vision" tag for questions regarding how the brain interprets information from the eyes.

1
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Well humans actually have a reduced spectrum compared to non-mammals. Reptiles and birds have 4 color sensitive cell types (cones), mammals lost two of these as modern mammals are descended from early …
answered Jul 17 '18 by John
3
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First squid lack both cones and rods, they evolved their eyes independently, the cells they use most closely resemble rods but they are by no means identical. In vertebrates there are two types of …
answered Oct 12 '17 by John
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the colors we humans with our trichromatic eyes cannot see. .Color for us is produced by a combination and comparison of cell activation. We can see every wavelength between about 4-700nm, we …
answered Feb 17 '17 by John
2
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strong blue and a weak red source will blend to about equal as far as our eyes are concerned so at the bluest end of the spectrum, where the blue activation is at its weakest it does not take much to … wavelength. It is blue light and red light without green light, it is not a real color but an artifact of how our eyes see light. Your cones can't tell how they are activated just that they are. Yellow and …
answered Mar 1 '18 by John
3
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will blend to about equal as far as our eyes are concerned so at the bluest end of the spectrum, where the blue activation is at its weakest it does not take much to activate the blue and red "blip … light without green light, it is not a real color but an artifact of how our eyes see light. Your cones can't tell how they are activated just that they are. Yellow and cyan (and every other common human …
answered Jun 22 by John
4
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The eye really on can sense 3 colors, or to be more precise it only has three types color sensitive each of which detects a large range of wavelengths with no way to distinguish between them within th …
answered Dec 19 '16 by John