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43

In summary, there is no convincing evidence to say that alcohol intoxication helps to treat or prevent parasites in humans. 1) The evidence from in vivo human studies does not support the idea that alcohol consumption helps in treating parasites. Alcoholism and Strongyloides stercoralis: Daily Ethanol Ingestion Has a Positive Correlation with the Frequency ...


17

The main reason why alcohols (isopropanol and ethanol mostly) can be used as disinfectants is that they denature (bacterial) proteins. This is also the reason why they work on such a broad spectrum of microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, viruses), but not on spores, as these are better protected. The higher the concentration of the alcohol is, the faster this ...


10

So this is a good question. 70% is optimal for most cell types, especially those with a cell wall like prokaryotes. Wikipedia is a little off here. The reason you add water is to make the solution hypotonic. The alcohol disrupts the hydrophobic forces holding the phospholipids of the membrane while dehydrating any peptidogylcan of the wall enough to ...


7

Methanol is rapidly absorbed not only after oral ingestion but by inhalation or after cutaneous exposure and becomes oxidised in the liver to formaldehyde and to formic acid, metabolites which are more toxic than methanol itself and which inhibit mitochondrial ATP production. Histopathologically, circumscribed myelin damage behind the lamina cribrosa ...


7

Preamble The question suggests unfamiliarity with the nature of biochemical oxidations and their relation to energy transfer in biology. The naïve reader is recommended to consult a text for a coverage of this subject: all I feel is appropriate here is a general summary followed by a brief indication of the key reactions. General principles of energetic ...


5

Although the previous answers give a resounding "No" for the case of human hosts and parasitic worms, a 2012 research paper (Alcohol Consumption As Self-Medication Against Blood-Borne Parasites In The Fruitfly) states that the larvae of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) actively seek out foods containing ethanol when they are infected by the eggs/larvae ...


4

After alcohol intake, the cerebrum related functions like vision and speech is affected first and later on there's problem with the cerebellar functions like balancing and hand-eye coordination. My question is- why is it so? Why do they appear in that order? It is and it isn't complicated. When you include what each does, it's an interesting question. We ...


4

The crystal violet stain will be removed if the decolorizer is left on too long. I'm assuming that the crystal violet complexes that are retained in the gram positive bacteria's peptidoglycan layers end up being washed away (perhaps from overdehydrtation).


4

Well, it turns out the situation is more complex. I had assumed the answer was what rwst suggests or something to do with osmotic pressure. It seems that we don't really know that well. In a paper from 1991, Chi and Wu suggest the following possible mechanisms : Membrane fusion during the shedding of exovesicles might produce a transient decrease of the ...


4

To begin answering your question, Does drinking alcohol in reasonable amount by healthy individual (nonalcoholic) having UTI helps to kill bacteria in the urinary tract (in order to get rid of them quicker)? We have to clarify that EtG detects ethyl glucuronide which is a byproduct of ethanol and remains in the urine for several day. The presence of ...


3

As is stated in this article by Hiller-Sturmhöfel and Swartzwelder from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, there are ethical issues surrounding research on human subjects that preclude direct testing, however studies in model mammals and observational studies do find that "adolescence is a unique stage of brain development which is ...


3

As Christiaan already pointed out, this depends on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. The effective drug concentration depends on the drug-receptor association constant and the drug degradation constant (for a highly simplified model). The degradation/removal depends on the abundance of the enzyme catalyzing this reaction. Ethanol is ...


3

Drosophila is seen as a highly alcohol tolerant species which is mainly dependent on the environment it lives in. So are flies, which are captured in the cellar of a wine yard more tolerant to alcohol than flies which are captured outside (see first reference). The environment in which the flies grow up and live does not influence the activity of the ...


3

Well, I was intrigued by this, and my intuitive response was that it would never be toxic at reasonable doses, but I was wrong. A quick Google search led me to this paper: Andresen, H. et al. (2009) Severe glycerol intoxication after Menière's disease diagnostic--case report and overview of kinetic data. Clin. Toxicol. 47: 312 - 6 Apparently in the ...


3

A chemist's perspective: Ethanol and water are miscible, meaning they are perfectly soluble in one another in all proportions. So given enough time, the alcohol will likely seep into the tissues and cells of the meat, and some water will seep out into the surrounding alcohol bath. The liquids might not equilibrate very well on a reasonable time scale, that ...


3

I commented above that it will depend heavily on at what pace you drink your rum, but in short, no, no you cannot. If you do it quickly, you'll die of alcohol poisoning, and if you drink it slowly, you'll probably die of dehydration[1]. io9 summed up some research a few years ago, the majority of which is largely bunk. One study (ncbi, free pdf) however, ...


3

The answer to your question depends on the kind of parasites you're focusing on. Looking at bacteria and gastro-intestinal infections, I found three articles (one based on a model stomach, a second one based on a questionnaire and serum analysis and a third one describing a specific incident), which indicate that there is a certain protective effect of ...


2

From the first principles: The most sensitive to alcohol part of the human body is it's nervous system. Worms have much simpler (in both biochemistry and organization) nervous system, so they will probably suffer less from a generic poison that the alcohol is. OTOH, you can easily find a substance that is WAY more toxic to the worms than to yourself. Up to ...


2

It is likely a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is released as a by-product of microbial metabolism, although microbes can also produce some inorganic compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide (rotten egg smell). It could be any of a number of compounds, depending on the microbial species and the environmental conditions. The only relevant paper I could find ...


2

There aren't many studies which associate between alcohol consumption and cancer to my knowledge. The association is more with metabolic diseases because the liver is affected. Alcohol is oxidised to acetaldehyde by alcohol dehydrogenase. Acetaldehyde may also, in turn affect the cells by DNA damage if it is not metabolized quickly to acetyl-CoA (perhaps in ...


2

The gut microbiome is extremely complicated, and almost anything related to it is only partially known, therefore prone to oversimplification. Trying to explain the phenomenon of gut fermentation syndrome in such a limited fashion (age, gender, ethnicity, quantity of one particular yeast, etc.) will not help us understand it. Common yeasts (C. albicans, C....


2

Drinking alcohol does not seem to be effective treatment for urinary tract infections. In this study, drinking 0.85 g ethanol/kg body weight (60 g ethanol or ~150 mL of 40% ABV spirit by a 70 kg person) resulted in 1 g of ethanol in the urine. 1 g of ethanol in 200 mL of urine = 0.5% alcohol. According to CDC: In the healthcare setting, “alcohol” refers ...


1

Aside from "toxins", the liver metabolizes a host of endogenous and exogenous compounds. Endogenous compounds are compounds that are normally present and produced within the body like ammonia and estrogens for example. Exogenous compounds are those like ethanol/alcohol, acetaminophen, and other drugs/etc that are not normally in the body but rather we take a ...


1

You are right, Culprit is Ethanol in Alcohol. It contains 2 carbon atoms, 6 Hydrogen atoms and 1 Oxygen atom. Ethanol is readily soluble in water, so it easily dissolves in the bloodstream and gets carried to various parts of the body. The most affected areas of the body include the liver and the brain. In the brain, ethanol adversely affects Glutamate ...


1

A very well-written question, so I'm sorry if my answer is a bit too simple. Perhaps it will attract attention of somebody with a better answer. I think the effect could be mainly caused by the fact that sugary drinks slow down alcohol absorption. So while those who drink just alcohol already know they've had enough, those who have had a couple of energy ...


1

First of all Alcohol and Acetaldehyde are both cytotoxic. Along in our development we learned to deal with both substances, which is shown by specific metabolism pathways to break them down (for example alcohol dehydrogenase, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, Cytochrom P450 and so on). Alcohol and Acetaldehyde both have a negative effect on mitosis (which ...


1

Ethanol, in less than 50% concentration, emulgates lipids and, through interference with hydrogen bonds, leads to conformational changes in proteins. Higher concentrations lead to denaturation of proteins and osmolysis of cells through small defects, so they finally burst, as ethanol forces a concentration equilibrium. This is why it's a good desinfection ...


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