18

Yes, those are definitely eggs. And I believe that is a female grass spider (Genus: Agelenopsis). Eggs are typically laid in late summer or fall and spiderlings emerge the following spring....A female that has mated with a male can produce more than one egg sac. For some species, it’s common to see two sacs at a time, side by side, attached to a surface (...


17

As you might have noticed from its appearance, this is a red velvet mite. This is an arachnid (related to spiders) and not an insect. The red velvet mite apparently does not bite or sting (according to this website), and it is also used for medicinal purposes in India, according to this Wikipedia image, so it is unlikely to be dangerous. If you haven't ...


17

Thanks for the pictures! That's the European Garden Spider (Araneus diadematus) They are most commonly seen from June to October, but they reach a peak around right now. This species is all over UK, and is widespread in gardens, woodland, and meadows. Here is another picture for reference: Fun Fact: After laying their eggs in late autumn, the females die ...


15

It is a black-tailed red sheetweaver, Florinda coccinea. Identified by its red body colour , location (USA) and black caudal tubercle. More images to be found on bugguide.net It is a species of web-building spider belonging to the family Linyphiidae. It is the only species in the genus Florinda. It is sometimes known as the red grass spider. This ...


15

This appears to be some species of jumping spider (family Salticidae). [Note that] All jumping spiders have four pairs of eyes, with the anterior median pair being particularly large. In particular, I believe your specimen is Phidippus audax (Bold Jumper). Specifically, I believe yours is a subadult bryantae variant of this species. Source: David ...


14

I think it looks a lot like a European Pigeon Tick (Argas reflexus). They infest pigeons and they die when infesting humans, which they only do if they are very hungry (yours looks hungry though). May also transmit diseases. Edit: It could also be an Blyborough Tick (Argas vespertilionis). They infest bats and are a little rounder in shape but look ...


12

After some more searching, I think stumbled across the answer. It appears to be an… Eriophora ravilla: Source BugGuide.net. This species appears to have quite a diverse range of colors, and even thought I haven't found one that quite matches mine, the other similarities (the large abdomen, the stripe down the back, the four 'dimples', and the dark ...


10

That jumping spider is a Jumping Spider! (That is, family Salticidae, commonly called Jumping Spiders). There's a lot of diversity in the family, but your pictures look similar to the Zebra Jumping Spider.


10

There are two parts to this answer. Spider Legs First, I would like to mention that spiders avoid sticking to their webs by more means than just non-sticky anchor strands to walk on. To help keep the glue from sticking to their legs, an oily substance apparently covers spider legs. Furthermore, the same study found that: In addition, Eberhard and Briceno ...


9

I can't tell how big your spider is. :( But I agree, it's probably not a wolf spider. (The fourth pair of legs is the longest in the wolf spider I think it might be a fishing spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus). They do hang out in man made structures and are the most common fishing spiders found. Fishing spiders are similar to the larger wolf spiders in size, ...


9

Short answer Approximately 240 J on a daily basis. Background Ballesteros et al. (2018) modeled basal metabolic rates of insects. They reckoned that endotherms, like insects, basically use energy directly correlated to the number of cells, which is linearly correlated to their body mass. They checked their model with experimental data from Chown et al. (...


8

This most likely is Microlinyphia pusilla. Note that this is a male, females look quite different. A picture that closely resembles yours can be found here https://www.ispotnature.org/node/402405 And in case you want to know, the Dutch name is 'kleine heidehangmatspin'


8

It appears to be a Noble False Widow Steatoda nobilis From http://britishspiders.org.uk/wiki2015/index.php?title=File:Steatoda_nobilis.jpg It apparently is thought to be introduced to the UK, and there are some reports that the bite has caused some issues for some people. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steatoda_nobilis


7

Kaleb Lechowski, creator of that video, is a digital creator and animator of critters. I would propose that he did a very good job of rendering a CGI spider to burst from a banana. Spiders (which are not insects remember) won't eat bananas. In fact, only one species is known to be mostly herbivorous: Bagheera kiplingi. However, don't eat that banana just ...


7

I believe it is a Garden Orb Weaver spider. The Australian garden orb weaver, Eriophora transmarina, has a strikingly similar body


7

Sub-adult tropical orb weaver spider. "Its range is largely circum-Caribbean, occurring in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas along the Gulf Coast of the United States." Harmless to humans and considered beneficial. Bites of this species are not known to cause serious effects to humans. ... The web probably catches many moths and other night flying insects; ...


7

This appears to be some species of jumping spider (family Salticidae) in the genus Psecas. For example, some red/blue striped species of Psecas: ] Sources: Top: Alchetron.com (image: Edwards, 2001) | Bottom: Tree of Life (image: Maddison 1994) Wikipedia lists the following species from Brazil: Psecas chapoda (Peckham & Peckham, 1894) – Brazil ...


7

Very useful image updates! These are actually not arachnids but hexapods called springtails (order Collembola). Although springtails are often very tiny and hard to see without a lens, you happen to find some "larger" specimens. Specifically, these appear to be some species in the family Dicyrtomidae. Credit: M. Bertone (source) Your species resembles ...


6

This is very likely a species in the Amaurobiidae superfamily, and I agree appears to be Callobius severus (the hackled-band weaver or the hackledmesh weaver). Source: Bugguide.net Source: Kyron Basu 2012 Moldenke et al. 1987 provide a key to spiders of the Pacific Northwest. Importantly, they note: adult genitalia are necessary for identifying ...


6

My best guess is a soft-bodied tick, perhaps of the Ornithodoros genus, although the determination of the species is a little more difficult. Though, if it's O. erraticus they're known for causing african swine fever in Spain and Portugal (1). Ornithodoros In response to the comments, here's a link from Texas A&M which notes the ticks pump waste+water ...


6

The definition of a leg from Merriam-Webster is "One of the rather generalized segmental appendages of an arthropod used in walking and crawling" As Gerardo Furtado has already stated, the front pair of appendages are called palpi and are not used for walking, but for mating and manipulating objects. By this definition, palpi are not legs and therefore ...


6

Definitely an arachnid and mite (subclass Acari), and very likely a member of the order Parasitiformes, of which there are more than 100,000 species!! The body plan is not all too different from a tick (order Ixodida), but the movement of your specimen in the video doesn't seem to match that of typical tick. As such, I next began examining species in the ...


6

This appears to be a bird mite (or possibly rat mite) in the genus Ornithonyssus of the parasitic family Macronyssidae. Credit: user Aewills on bugguide.com Identification: From Central Exterminating Co.: The mites are distinguished from most other common, structural species by the very long legs and very long mouthparts. These long, pointed ...


5

I don't think it's an Arizona recluse. Characteristic of all recluse spiders (including the five varieties found in Arizona): Long thin legs Oval shaped abdomen 6 eyes in dyads (pairs) Uniformly colored abdoment with fine hairs No spines on legs Legs are uniformly colored Light tan to dark brown in color Distinct violin-shaped mark on on ...


5

Looks like a house spider (Tegenaria domestica)


5

I do not know what species of spider this is, but I think the white ball is actually spider poop. Unfortunately a quick search did not return many references, but here is a picture for comparison. Spiders produce uric acid, which is a near-solid and excreted out white. This is done to minimize water loss. These malpighian tubules drain into an pouch ...


5

In sexually dimorphic ant-mimicking spiders, it depends on the specific species which sex resembles the ant most (Cushing, 2012). In many cases of sexually dimorphic spider myrmecomorphs, the male is more mimetic than the female, such as in Corinnidae species and the genus Castianeira, Oonopidae and Antoonops. Such sexual dimorphism may be adaptive if the ...


5

It looks like a species from the Arachnid order Amblypygi (Tail-less whip scorpions), which are closely related to Thelyphonida (Whip Scorpions). As part of Arachnids, both of these taxa are related to spiders and scorpions, but belong to a separate order. Even if they look scary, they are harmless to humans, even if they can sometimes bite. According to ...


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