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2

It is a crab spider, likely of genus Xysticus but possibly genus Ozyptila. If you needed to get down to genus, bugguide (https://bugguide.net/node/view/63082) says that we can differentiate these genera by counting the macrosetae (the thick hairs) on the front legs. You would need some high-quality zoomed photos to check those. In general, eating spiders is ...


2

This is a false wolf spider called Zoropsis spinimana: It is found all over Europe, including the London,UK area: A photo gallery and distribution map of user-submitted observations of Zoropsis spinimana can be found here: https://inaturalist.org/taxa/127112-Zoropsis-spinimana


1

Without a sense of how big this spider exactly, but based on the width of the grouting, I'm guessing body length of about 15-18 mm (0.59 - 0.71 in). This, along with the colouration and long palps would most likely make it Eratigena atrica also known as the Giant House Spider. This species is widespread in Europe and parts of North America, so not of ...


13

For many species the mother abandons the eggs after laying them and there is no maternal care (sometimes the mother dies after laying eggs, so really no possibility of maternal care). Paternal care is generally completely lacking as well (and sometimes the father is expected to die before hatching). And many of those species are solitary, so not learning ...


22

Spiders’ ability to weave webs is a classic example of an innate or instinctual behavior. They do not learn to make webs. The earliest English-language scientific publication that I can find to back this claim is Porter 1906 1, which focuses on variation in the webs of Orb-weaving spiders: The web of the Orb-weaving Spiders has long been one of the ...


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