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6

There are photosynthetic archaea (such as Halobacterium) but the mechanism is different. They use rhodopsin-like ion pumps (bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin) to move ions against the gradient and produce ATP via chemiosmosis (like mitochondria).


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A) Archaea cells contain small membrane-enclosed organelles; bacteria do not. FALSE. As you said, Archaea and Bacteria are prokaryotes: that don't have any nucleus nor membrane-bound organelles. B) Archaea cells contain a membrane-bound nucleus; bacteria do not. FALSE. See comment above. C) DNA is present in both archaea cells and bacteria cells. TRUE. ...


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The exact term — wetwood, is used only once in the original article (Yip et al., 2018). Others have found that water content of heartwood tissue was the best predictor of methane flux across multiple plant species (Machacova et al., 2016; Wang et al., 2017), however this was not a strong predictor of methanogen relative abundance in our analyses. ...


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To date, there isn't a single species that may be considered pathogenic to animals or plants. There are archeon who live in association with animals (in the case of human, they have been found in the gut microbiota aswell as certain skin surfaces) that are mainly methanogens. This could lead to think that archaons could produce "pathologic farting", but that ...


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The stability and replication of the DNA of thermophiles is an interesting problem, for which there does not appear to be a single unequivocal answer. However the way you express this question is unfortunate: the hydrogen bonds in the DNA of thermophiles (which include some eubacteria as well as archea) are the same as those in any other genomic DNA. The ...


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I suspect this falls under the no-homework policy, so I will not give a full answer, just lots of links to point in the right direction. A good reading material is the genome sequence papers, such as that for Methanopyrus kalderi. The domain Archaea contains some of the most thermophilic organisms of this planet. Very thermophilic organisms are called ...


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It's probably the yellow bacterial mats, which are rich in life. The mats are a stratified ecology which varies with distance from the surface, so they are rich in many species of algea, procarote and eukariote. In Yellowstone, the bacterial mats can range in color including brown, green, yellow and orange. They are different to precipitated minerals. You ...


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The genetic code of the tree of life is actively studied. So far, all the living beings have conformed to LUCA model. They are all RNA and DNA dependent, and no other life forms are known. All the RNA and DNA life forms share a tree like inheritance pattern with more simple organisms. Sometimes there is doubt about wether mushrooms are more closely related ...


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It is quite likely (but impossible to study) that the first stages of life originated more than once. However, the evidence that all currently existing life originated from the same population is very strong. On the most basic level, many of the basic building blocks of life, RNA, DNA, amino acids are chiral, which means they come in multiple forms, but ...


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You could try Paracoccus denitrificans. Here is a study where acetate is used as the growth-limiting substrate: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.320.1692&rep=rep1&type=pdf Here's the details of its version of acetate kinase: http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/A1B9S8 I'd be happy to collaborate with you further on this.


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Actually, there exist at least one reference to a negative effect of Nanoarchaeum towards its host. Jahn et al (2008) describes that single Ignicoccus cells wich had more than two Nanoarchaeum cells attached were unable to grow, while those with two or less could form a colony. It's true that there isn't strong evidence to considere Nanoarchaeum as a ...


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